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Old 06-19-09, 10:12 PM   #1
AdvenJack
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Wanted Features In A Bike

I am 6'2" and 200+ lbs, I like the http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/09/cusa/model-8AS3.html

-24 or even better 27 speed, add disk brakes, full sized road type fenders, head light & tail light,

shimano generating front hub to power the lights, and fatter tires. Is this all possible? If yes, at

what total cost?
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Old 06-20-09, 02:02 PM   #2
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You can't take a bike that comes with V-brakes and just add on disk brakes. The fork and frame must have the mounts to attach disk brakes. The cost of a good set of name-brand mechanical disk brakes will cost you more than $200. The hydraulic disk brakes on my trike sell for more than the entire cost of the Cannondale you gave the link for. I also wonder why you would add the extra weight and mechanical disadvantage of a generator hub to your bike. Today's LED lights require so little energy that a small battery pack will last for many hours. I ride in and urban area so I don't need the front light to light up the road. My rear lights (3) are dollar store blinkies and the front light is an LED flashlight with a homemade clip to mount it to the trike.

Have you considered a higher quality used bike over a new one? My at-work bike that I use to get from one building to another is a Cannondale SM800 MTB. It has Shimano Deore components and I found it in a second hand store for $20. It has no suspension but the tires are the wider 26 X 1.9 that give a good ride on rough roads. While deals like this one don't come along very frequently there are a lot of lightly used MTBs on Craigslist or possibly in the local paper. A decade or so ago, I bought a Balance 450 aluminum MTB from a local fellow who needed a mortgage payment. I paid him about 1/3 of the new price. It is a fine, light bike with components far better than what I would have gotten if I simply walked into a bike store and plunked down the $450 I paid him for it. Plus, no sales tax on a used bike. I think it is wiser to buy a bike with the features you really want than to buy one that doesn't and then try to make it into something you want to ride.
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Old 06-20-09, 08:14 PM   #3
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Trek Portland http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...land/portland/ would be a start on what you want. The lights and such, you'll have to add.
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Old 06-20-09, 11:58 PM   #4
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Regards 24-spd. drivetrain, this Cannondale has that. You can generally mount larger-width tires, but why would you? This has 700 X 38C. Those are plenty big for most purposes. Most people would want thinner tires. And the v-brakes on it will stop you quite well. Going to disc-brakes would require a new wheel - at least. Then you could also see about getting a freehub to support a 9-spd. cassette. Then you'd need to also get a new chain.

Good Luck!
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Old 06-21-09, 01:53 AM   #5
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If you must have disc brakes- then the Portland is probably one of the better bikes to get- Kona also make a couple and other manufacturers do aswell. But are disc brakes necessary? If it is rain riding that is your problem- then it is a simple enough job to put a better brake block onto rim brakes such as Koolstops.

The Dynamo set up would not be done by many and the easy way out is to get a wheel built up taking a dynamo hub. This can be done on any bike.

Fenders and all you need are the eyelest on the frame and forks to be able to fit them

What I would be worried about are the wheels. 200lbs is not excessive but you will put more strain on them than my 150lbs does. The cannondale wheels are basically sound but I would get them into a wheelbuilder to let him detension and rebuild the wheels. A good wheelbuilder will work wonders on the most basic of machine built wheels.
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Old 06-21-09, 05:58 AM   #6
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Trek Portland was the first bike that came into my mind too.

If you like the "hybrid" style more than a road bike-
Raleigh Detour Deluxe

I waited months to get my 2008 DD. I love the disc brakes and dynamo hub. Great bike!



If there is an REI near you- The Novara Fusion is a similar bike.


EDIT: Both these bikes run around $900. I'm 6'3" and well over 200lbs. The Detour deluxe has been great. One flat and 3 broken spokes in 2 years and several thousand miles. No complaints.

Last edited by HandsomeRyan; 06-21-09 at 06:22 AM. Reason: added info.
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Old 06-21-09, 06:55 AM   #7
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I just sort of assumed that you couldn't put a disk brake and a dynamo hub on the same wheel. Don't know if that's true or not.

Look up the Raleigh Sojourn. A different style of bike, but comes with some of the features you're looking at.
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Old 06-21-09, 07:17 AM   #8
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I just sort of assumed that you couldn't put a disk brake and a dynamo hub on the same wheel. Don't know if that's true or not.
Both bikes I listed above use dynamo hubs w/ disc brakes.

My Detour Deluxe uses Shimano DH3D Dynamo Disc hub, no idea what the Novara uses.



Note- the lights in this picture are not being run off the dynamo, they are battery powered, the dynamo runs the (much brighter) head light. The pic was just to demonstrate a dynamo w/ a disc brake.

Last edited by HandsomeRyan; 06-21-09 at 08:12 AM. Reason: Added picture.
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Old 06-21-09, 08:01 AM   #9
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Great Stuff All. Thank you for the input
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Old 06-21-09, 09:55 PM   #10
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If you'd rather stick with Cannondale, here's one of the bikes they sell with discs and a dynohub:
http://gb.cannondale.com/bikes/09/ce/model-9SS2.html

Gotta buy it from their European division, though.

(this is what I want: dynohub, Supernova headlight, Rohloff hub, Avid hydraulic discs, Headshok fork with lockout.. http://gb.cannondale.com/bikes/09/ce/model-9TK1.html )
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Old 06-22-09, 11:02 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasTriker View Post
You can't take a bike that comes with V-brakes and just add on disk brakes. The fork and frame must have the mounts to attach disk brakes. The cost of a good set of name-brand mechanical disk brakes will cost you more than $200. The hydraulic disk brakes on my trike sell for more than the entire cost of the Cannondale you gave the link for. I also wonder why you would add the extra weight and mechanical disadvantage of a generator hub to your bike. Today's LED lights require so little energy that a small battery pack will last for many hours. I ride in and urban area so I don't need the front light to light up the road. My rear lights (3) are dollar store blinkies and the front light is an LED flashlight with a homemade clip to mount it to the trike.

Have you considered a higher quality used bike over a new one? My at-work bike that I use to get from one building to another is a Cannondale SM800 MTB. It has Shimano Deore components and I found it in a second hand store for $20. It has no suspension but the tires are the wider 26 X 1.9 that give a good ride on rough roads. While deals like this one don't come along very frequently there are a lot of lightly used MTBs on Craigslist or possibly in the local paper. A decade or so ago, I bought a Balance 450 aluminum MTB from a local fellow who needed a mortgage payment. I paid him about 1/3 of the new price. It is a fine, light bike with components far better than what I would have gotten if I simply walked into a bike store and plunked down the $450 I paid him for it. Plus, no sales tax on a used bike. I think it is wiser to buy a bike with the features you really want than to buy one that doesn't and then try to make it into something you want to ride.
He's right about the disc brake thing - you need to buy a bike that's designed for disc brakes originally if you want to be sure you can actually put disc brakes on it.

Actually, today's LED lights are what makes dynamo hubs practical and reasonable. In the old days of halogen bulbs dynamo lights were kind of useless (well, IMO) because they really only put out enough light to "be seen by". So you would spend $250 on a hub, wheel, and light, and end up needing to buy a battery light to put out enough light to bike at night with, anyways.

But todays LED dynamo lights actually put out enough light to see by without needing any additional lights, for around $100 for the light (and probably $200 for the hub). I have the Lumotec Cyo. See this page for pics:
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/headlights.asp

Like this:


A light that lasts "many hours", if you're commuting on your bike, generally means you have to charge the batteries every day which is a pain. Naturally there's plenty of good battery powered lights to, just wanted to defend dynamo lights.
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Old 06-22-09, 04:47 PM   #12
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VERY, VERY informative article, thank you!
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Old 06-26-09, 06:19 PM   #13
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C-Dale Adventure 3 Chosen

http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/09/cusa/model-8AS3.html

It's the first quality bike I've owned, [at now 49 yrs old] and I am amazed

at the hills that I can climb on the local roads around my northwest New

Jersey home. I mean I am just blown away. It's got me happy, excited and

so on to be able to go here and there with these pretty serious hills. I hope

the spark stays with me, and that in a year or three I am upgrading to an

even better model C-Dale. I hope everyone has this kind of fun biking.
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Old 06-27-09, 05:16 AM   #14
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I had a disk-compatable dynohub built up by my local bike shop. The Shimano one is very effective, the SON one is better but much more expensive.

There is an arms race in the world of LED front lamps. Anything you buy will be "obscelete" within a year but they are just so much better than traditional lamps. My B&M Fly Senso is so good I feel no need to upgrade to the latest model.

Have a close look at the Portland rear luggage rack, they have solved the problem of integrating a rack and disk brakes. The other way of solving this problem is like this

and check out the Dailybread.

The front disk brake can interfere with fender mounting so you may have to bend the fender metal stay around the brake.
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Old 06-27-09, 06:16 AM   #15
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Quote:
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The front disk brake can interfere with fender mounting so you may have to bend the fender metal stay around the brake.
Which reminds me --

There's at least one bike manufacturer out there who puts the disc mounts on the front of the fork. They say it's for two reasons -- to keep the wheel lodged in the dropouts (one supposed concern about disc brakes is that they can pull the front wheel out of the fork) and to make room for easy fender mounting.

Anybody remember who this was?
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Old 06-28-09, 03:38 AM   #16
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I think it is Cotic. Its a good idea for running a std disk hub, it ensures that braking force acts to seat the axle in the dropout rather than rip it out.
The problem is that you have to run the hub backwards. Is there any problem running a dynohub in reverse direction?

Some bikes have the fender eyelets halfway up the fork, which is another solution.
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Old 06-28-09, 07:35 AM   #17
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Actually, it wasn't Cotic, but it's good to see more than one doing it.

I don't think running a dynohub backwards would be a problem. It puts out AC current, correct?
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Old 07-12-09, 10:53 PM   #18
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Hills Don't Stop Me!!!

Well, so far there has not been a hill that has caused me to to stop
peddling and walk the bike up. The low gear is amazing! I have severe
hills all around me and I have done a 14.6 mile ride so far which
included several long tough climbs. I know I could do 25 miles on flat
land, and I tell you I am in NO physical shape at all. My legs are
getting stronger already though, and that makes me happy. I am so
glad that I bought this C'dale Adventure 3 bike. There may be other
2 wheelers out there for similar money that are as good or better, but
I am happy that I have what I have.
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Old 07-13-09, 12:49 AM   #19
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Just wait till you get something like this:
http://www.bmc-racing.com/index.php?...04bbbc2147e42c

Save up now and get it for your 55th birthday, or after 15,000 miles, whichever comes first.
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Old 07-13-09, 06:05 PM   #20
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Sharp Picture, But...

...can you share more info about the frame and fork that you have posted the linked to.
I know close to zero about bikes so feel free to be as detailed as you care to be. As to
hills, look out New Hampshire's Mt. Washington!
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Old 07-13-09, 06:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
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...can you share more info about the frame and fork that you have posted the linked to.
I know close to zero about bikes so feel free to be as detailed as you care to be. As to
hills, look out New Hampshire's Mt. Washington!
All I know is, it's stupid light, way expensive, and I have yet to ride one myself (although I may get the chance at a demo..).

More info here:
http://www.bmc-racing.com/en/us/bike...iss-red/story/
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Old 07-13-09, 07:58 PM   #22
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BarracksSI, stop teasing the natives .

I have a BMC TT03 sitting here. Gawd I love that bike!
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Old 07-13-09, 08:20 PM   #23
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BarracksSI, stop teasing the natives .
Hehe..

Quote:
I have a BMC TT03 sitting here. Gawd I love that bike!
I went to take a look at a Langster at a local's house, and he had an all-black Pro Machine. I can't believe the shapes they make in the carbon on that thing. Pictures don't do it justice. I mentioned to him about the Team Machine at a local shop and he goes, "MAN, that would be a cool bike..."
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Old 07-15-09, 07:52 PM   #24
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So is BMC the worlds BEST?

{Ala Patek Philippe watches www.patek.com **

Now granted there are other independent watch

makers that make very few watches per year that

may well be superior to Patek, but comparing those

firms that produce a measureable number of bikes

is BMC the PATEK of bikes?
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Old 07-15-09, 08:20 PM   #25
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"Best"? There is no "best" bike. I'll give two reasons --

There are so many different combinations of parts that can be put on a bike frame. Just with wheels alone, you can make it perform better (sometimes only marginally so) in different situations -- climbing, time trialing, flat sprints, whatever. Never mind the choices of drivetrains, handlebars, saddles, etc.

The rider is a huge part of the package -- not just in weight, but also in personal preferences and physical performance abilities. Even after starting with the same frame, picky riders will end up with quite different bikes.

BMC is up there among the high-end names, for sure. But then again, every major manufacturer has high-end models, too, and you'll find a whole range of bikes in the Tour de France.

If there was one best bike, every pro would be riding it.
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