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  1. #1
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Nee help choosing a 3rd bike!

    Hello all. This is my first post at this forum and I'd like some input from you. I have two bikes. One is a 1993 Bridgestone G6 (21" CroMo frame, 26" wheels, thumb-shift); the other is a Specialized Expedition, (Limited Edition 21" aluminum frame, 26" wheels, rapid fire shifters) I use the Bridgestone for commuting and the Expedition for "joy-rides." The problem with the Expedition is that the heavy front suspension forks adds significant weight so I can't get any "zip" out of it. My Bridgestone has a chromaly frame w/o any suspension. I actually prefer the ride -- for long distances at least-- to my Specialized. The aluminum frame of the Specialized renders a rather "stiff" ride. Consequently, I'm considering a 3rd bike. In addition to a lighter and faster bike, I want the new bike to be significantly different from what I already have in order to get a "different biking experience"

    What I want is a bike with:
    1. CroMo frame, in the $350-400 price range
    2. NO suspension fork (to keep it light)
    3. Seat-post suspension would be nice (because it renders a degree of comfort)
    4. 700cm wheels
    5. Quality SRAM grip shifters, (I hear they make some good quality ones)
    6. Handlebars that will allow an upright position (I have back problems).

    I would use the bike for fitness purposes on a bike path and to zip about town....5-10 miles per day tops. I'm wondering if a 700cm wheel frame is going to be a problem because of my weight (285 lbs. but looking to lose 30 lbs.) I won't be doing any wheelies or jumping curves, that's for sure! I'd like to get some input and brandname/model recommendations for any bicycles that fit the criteria I've outlined. I look forward to your ideas.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    The King of Town manboy's Avatar
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    hmm, it looks like you need a steel fixie/ss with north road bars. you got your zip, you got your different biking experience, and you got your nice ride. it will be perfect for 5-10 miles per day. i'm sure you could find some strong enough wheels, too; you'll probably want to go with 32 spokes. plus you can be really self-righteous about riding fixed/ss.

  3. #3
    Super Biker Mtn Mike's Avatar
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    Look at building up a Surly CrossCheck or some other steel cyclocross bike.

  4. #4
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    Your third bike's gotta be fixed!
    .cinelli.olympic.surly.long.haul.trucker.kona.ku.surly.steamroller.
    .litespeed.classic.litespeed.firenze.bianchi.pista.dean.colonel.plus.more.

  5. #5
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    I would look at one of the Jamis bikes. The Aurora is within your budget at Bicycleblowout.com. I would also look at one of the Jamis cross bikes. I also like the Crosscheck.

  6. #6
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve
    I would look at one of the Jamis bikes. The Aurora is within your budget at Bicycleblowout.com. I would also look at one of the Jamis cross bikes. I also like the Crosscheck.
    The Jamis Aurora is a terrific looking but, for two reasons, I'll pass. 1) I have a slipped disc, so riding in an extend-leaning postion is quite uncomfortable 2) Even at the blowout price, w/ shipping, it's more than I want to spend. Looking over some of the other Jamis bikes I see two possibilites: the Coda Sport and Coda Elite. Both have cromo frames. Maybe when the '05 bikes arrive, the '03 and '04 prices will be better . Anybody have any experience with either of these bikes?

    http://tinyurl.com/343pk

    http://tinyurl.com/2gjoq

    I'd have to switch over to another handlebar configuration.

  7. #7
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by manboy
    hmm, it looks like you need a steel fixie/ss with north road bars. you got your zip, you got your different biking experience, and you got your nice ride. it will be perfect for 5-10 miles per day. i'm sure you could find some strong enough wheels, too; you'll probably want to go with 32 spokes. plus you can be really self-righteous about riding fixed/ss.
    I like the look of them, but they're a bit too sparse for me. I have a killer hill down the road that I occasionally need to climb at least once a week. And, my understanding is that fixed bikes don't coast. Hey, I like to coast!

  8. #8
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn Mike
    Look at building up a Surly CrossCheck or some other steel cyclocross bike.
    That Surly is another good looking bike (I just commented about the Jamis Aurora) but no can do because of a back-condition that won't allow for that kind of riding position and due of the hefty price. Thanks though!

  9. #9
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    A flat-bar road/sport bike would do you. You can build these up from light-touring road bikes (like the Surley), or buy them ready made (Coda or Specialized Sirius).
    You dont really need a sus post, they are heavy and cheap ones wear out. A lightweight bike will be much more fun to ride, and can easily cope with trails.

  10. #10
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    -For steel and a flatbar, about your only option is going to be a custom Surly. The Surly frames are very well made and high quality but a tad bit heavy in some areas. Get a frame with brake bosses for V-brakes so you can run a larger tire (improves the ride a lot)

    -Wheels are designated as 700c, not CM btw... they aren't 700c (a mistake I still catch myself making from time to time). For a wheelset, Velocity makes some relatively inexpensive almost indestructable wheelsets (Spartacus line comes to mind--its what I have)... Campagnolo Proton wheels are extremely strong as well, and a Shimano compatible version is available. Slap some 35-40x700c tires on there and you're golden.

    -I'm not 100% sure on this but I think the high end SRAM gripshift is only compatible with SRAM derailleurs, so that limits your choices there. I am not sure if you are looking for road or MTB gear, but if you are looking for road gearing I don't know if a SRAM .9 or X.0 derailleur will work with a road cassette.

    -For a seatpost I would avoid the suspension post, esp. if you are 285lbs. I'm not sure they are rated for a larger rider, and you will be bobbing a lot. If you do get one though, the Cane Creek Thudbuster is about the best out there by most accounts.

    Good luck!

  11. #11
    The King of Town manboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemando
    I like the look of them, but they're a bit too sparse for me. I have a killer hill down the road that I occasionally need to climb at least once a week. And, my understanding is that fixed bikes don't coast. Hey, I like to coast!
    well, what you could do is get something with an internally geared hub, especially if you're going to be doing some commuting. i've been wanting to do that for a long time. so low maintenance and elegant... really what i want is an updated english roadster, but faster, which i'm guessing would be good for your needs. definitely look into north road bars for a versatile, upright, ergonomic position though.

  12. #12
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    A flat-bar road/sport bike would do you. You can build these up from light-touring road bikes (like the Surley), or buy them ready made (Coda or Specialized Sirius).
    You dont really need a sus post, they are heavy and cheap ones wear out. A lightweight bike will be much more fun to ride, and can easily cope with trails.
    Okay thanks. Does anyone know if the flat handle bars such as used on the Coda Elite or Coda Sport could be changed to a high-rise adjustable stem as seen on comfort bikes?

  13. #13
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    A flat-bar road/sport bike would do you. You can build these up from light-touring road bikes (like the Surley), or buy them ready made (Coda or Specialized Sirius).
    You dont really need a sus post, they are heavy and cheap ones wear out. A lightweight bike will be much more fun to ride, and can easily cope with trails.
    Hello Michael. I thought I had replied to you yesterday but I don't see the post. Anyway, the basic gist of what I had said was that I'm pretty sure a Coda Elite or Coda Sport would work well, if I lose the flat handlebar and replace it with a north road bar, as has been recommended. And yes a lightweight bike would be more fun to ride. That's basically why I want another. I've got a commuter and a rather heavy "comfort" bike. Now I'm looking for a light-weight bike that I can "zip-about" town and on a bike path.

  14. #14
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seely
    -For steel and a flatbar, about your only option is going to be a custom Surly. The Surly frames are very well made and high quality but a tad bit heavy in some areas. Get a frame with brake bosses for V-brakes so you can run a larger tire (improves the ride a lot)

    -Wheels are designated as 700c, not CM btw... they aren't 700c (a mistake I still catch myself making from time to time). For a wheelset, Velocity makes some relatively inexpensive almost indestructable wheelsets (Spartacus line comes to mind--its what I have)... Campagnolo Proton wheels are extremely strong as well, and a Shimano compatible version is available. Slap some 35-40x700c tires on there and you're golden.

    -I'm not 100% sure on this but I think the high end SRAM gripshift is only compatible with SRAM derailleurs, so that limits your choices there. I am not sure if you are looking for road or MTB gear, but if you are looking for road gearing I don't know if a SRAM .9 or X.0 derailleur will work with a road cassette.

    -For a seatpost I would avoid the suspension post, esp. if you are 285lbs. I'm not sure they are rated for a larger rider, and you will be bobbing a lot. If you do get one though, the Cane Creek Thudbuster is about the best out there by most accounts.

    Good luck!
    No flatbar thank you ) and I want the frame to be as light as possible... but still strong. And if I go the route of getting a frame, I'll be sure to get one that will accept V-brakes. I wasn't aware that that was something to consider. Your correction about the 700c wheels is a point well taken... my mistake. Thanks for the wheel-set recommendation... good info in this post. Thanks!

  15. #15
    Senior Member bluemando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by manboy
    well, what you could do is get something with an internally geared hub, especially if you're going to be doing some commuting. i've been wanting to do that for a long time. so low maintenance and elegant... really what i want is an updated english roadster, but faster, which i'm guessing would be good for your needs. definitely look into north road bars for a versatile, upright, ergonomic position though.
    This "internal hub idea" is an excellent suggestion and one that I must look into. You got me thinking that this is the way to go. Many thanks.

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