Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need a Bike for College

    Looking to get a good bike that looks good (my price range is around $500). The atmosphere of the college is a town (just about all the traveling around campus I will do is under 2 miles) and the cars aren't exceeding 30 mph and the traffic is mild.

    I was thinking of getting this cruiser bike http://tinyurl.com/qnvrh2
    The only problem is that it does not have hand brakes, which makes slowing down and stopping a bit more difficult.

    The difference with me is that bikes don't get stolen at my college. We have a very very very low crime rate and while I'm not going to get a $2000 bike and leave it outside, I think one around $500 will be completely safe with a lock

    Any suggestions regarding the bike I should be looking for
    Last edited by GalopoGus; 07-05-09 at 02:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,013
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lots of posts on college bikes. I would suggest checking craigslist and other students to see what is available used. Consider a folding bike.
    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
    2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

  3. #3
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    7,368
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can get a decent hybrid for $500. They are good on roads and on dirt and gravel trails. Jack-of-most-trades bikes. And they are just plain fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    My Bikes
    1952 JC Higgins Jet Flow, 1957 AMF Roadmaster Deluxe, 1959 Columbia Firebolt, 1962 Columbia Newsboy Special, 1964 JC Higgins (unkown model), 1968 Juncker Flying Jet promotional bike, 1981 Raleigh fixed gear, 1982 Murray Monterrey (customized), & more
    Posts
    145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The difference with me is that bikes don't get stolen at my college.
    Did the college tell you that? Because colleges are normally targets for bike thieves, both on and off campus.

    The only problem is that it does not have hand brakes, which makes slowing down and stopping a bit more difficult.
    I built two custom cruisers for my niece and nephew to use at college, both are single speed coaster brake bikes with no handbrakes. This is so there are no gear or brake cables for some drunken frat boy or football player to yank off the bike when it's parked outside. Plus, they are at schools which are flat so they won't be flying downhill anywhere. A rear brake of any type isn't going to stop as efficiently as a front hand brake in most situations, but you can certainly stop the rear tire and put down one heck of a skid with most coaster brakes. In other words, they work sufficiently in most cases.

    The gears and quality/type of brakes needed will depend on the campus terrain. More hills = more gears and better brakes.

    The hybrid is a good all-round solution, and you can find decent ones for $500 or so. Something like the Trek 7.2 or Schwinn World GS (not as good as the Trek quality-wise, but which has things a student would need like fenders, a rear rack, and a chain guard so your pants don't get grease on them). But if you're only going 2 miles at a pop, maybe even a sport comfort bike would work. They have really relaxed rider positions and fatter tires for a smoother ride. They're often a 3 or 7 speed which is great for shorter flat rides, a hybrid is usually for longer rides and you might be paying for things you won't need for such a casual outing. Examples of sport comforts would be the Nirve Starliner, Schwinn Alloy DX, or Trek Navigator (sorry, I just got back from looking at some Treks earlier today).

    The nice thing about a hybrid is that it might come in handy after graduation, and the extra flexibility will allow the bike to meet a greater range of needs. I'm still using my college/grad school MTB bike from ten years ago, and I'm nowhere near a mountain. It's just a style of bike which can be adapted to most needs, although it won't be as efficient as a purpose-built bike.
    Last edited by subclavius; 07-05-09 at 05:19 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •