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  1. #1
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    Hi guys,

    I would like to know if a MTB wheel can take more abuse (rough terrain, curbs, pavement holes,etc.) than a road 27" wheel with the same number of spokes.

    Thats because i just buyed a old road bike, and im loving it, but my ride style and most my enviroment make me getting up and down the curbs all the time, i used to ride like that with MTBs with no problems, but now i am so afraid of hurt my road babe.BTW she has steel or iron? (not aluminun) rims with 36 spokes.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by cart@@n; 06-23-04 at 04:31 PM. Reason: type error

  2. #2
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    In most cases the mountain bike wheel is going to be a whole lot tougher.

    Mountain bike rims are wider and usually have stronger extrusion sections. Even if the rim extrusions were the same, the smaller diameter mountain bike wheel would require less braceing from the spokes to be equally strong because a small diameter hoop is going to be more rigid than a large one. Mountain bike wheels actually get better spoke braceing angles due to both it's smaller diameter and to more widely spaced rear hub flanges.

    The tire sections are going to make a lot of difference too.

  3. #3
    Senior Member landrover's Avatar
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    Mountain bike rims are tougher..i had a *hybrid* once and tried to take it off road...it couldn't handle the terrain and my weight...the rear rim popped two spokes.

  4. #4
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
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    You have to compare apples to apples here people. A cheap 700c rim will perform poorly like a cheap 26" rim will, likewise an expensive 700c rim will perform as good as a expensive 26" rim. Inherently the 700c will be weaker b/c of the additional diameter though. 29" MTB's are just using wider 700c rims for the most part, similar to what you would find on a touring bike or hybrid.

    Now, you put some well made Campy Protons on that hybrid, and it would take a thrashing. I saw a 235lbs rider smack into a squared curb on Campy Protons at over 16mph and the wheel didn't even need to be trued. The rider went over the bars even. Also you need to talk lacing patterns. My MTB has a radially laced front thats always out of true despite the quality Mavic 225 rim. The 3x rear hasn't had to be trued yet.

  5. #5
    Senior Member markm109's Avatar
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    Perfect timing - I was just wondering about this subject.

    I bought a bike from the lbs last fall on clearance that was billed as a cyclocross bike. It has 700m wheels, Mavic Open Pros - 32 or 36 spokes (I can't remember and haven't counted them) and 35mm knobbies. I switched out the knobbies for more of a road tire and have been riding it all summer.

    But a new rail to trail path has opened up with about 1/2 paved and other other dirt / crushed gravel.

    How strong are those Mavic wheels? I don't want to mess up my nice bike but would like to go on that trail with the bike. I've gone on it with my mtb but would like to also use my new bike.

    FYI - it was a Litespeed Blue Ridge, which sounds like is more of a touring bike after researcing it than cyclocross but I would think has the frame strenght for cyclocross.

    Mark

  6. #6
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    I ride some nicely hand-built, but mid-range 700c wheels (36 spoke) on and off road. I do a lot of trail riding, hopping curbs etc. They can take it with no problem.
    An old set of wheels with steel rims may be more delicate.
    A lot depends on your riding style.

  7. #7
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    Thanks everybody.

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    An old set of wheels with steel rims may be more delicate.
    So a aluminun rim would be more strong?
    Just in case of some day i need to buy new ones.

  8. #8
    Team Beer Cynikal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cart@@n
    Thanks everybody.



    So a aluminun rim would be more strong?
    Just in case of some day i need to buy new ones.
    If you are going to build new ones, try to find some 36 hole MTB 29er'sand lace them up in a 3X pattern. I've heard good things about thier strength and the size would work for tires. This is my plan for my next urban assault bike (fixie of course).

    Cheers
    I'm not one for fawning over bicycles, but I do believe that our bikes communicate with us, and what this bike is saying is, "You're an idiot." BikeSnobNYC

  9. #9
    2-Cyl, 1/2 HP @ 90 RPM slvoid's Avatar
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    The girl I tagged along with for a few laps at the local park said that the guys in the TDF ride over cobble stone roads and their road wheels seem to be fine. Told me there was nothing to worry about.

  10. #10
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    Those racing wheels for the "pave" surfaces of Northern France are top quality handbuilt, both strong and light.

    For general purpose riding, touring grade wheels are ideal. They are strong but also durable, with thick, long-lasting braking surfaces. I'm not sure if there is any difference between a 29" MTB rim and a 700c touring style rim.
    Steel rims are totally obscelete. Al is stronger, since it is extruded in a box cross-section, as well as lighter and more resistant to corrosion.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    Steel rims are totally obscelete. Al is stronger, since it is extruded in a box cross-section, as well as lighter and more resistant to corrosion.
    Thank you

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynikal
    If you are going to build new ones, try to find some 36 hole MTB 29er'sand lace them up in a 3X pattern. I've heard good things about thier strength and the size would work for tires. This is my plan for my next urban assault bike (fixie of course).
    Cheers
    Thank you, ill see if they got this over here.

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