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Old 07-06-09, 09:45 PM   #1
SteelCity
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Why no pumps?

Hey guys, I am new to biking again (it's been 15 years) and have been getting very good information from this forum. I have decided on a Specialized HardRock for a bike, now I need to look into a few extras.

I'm somewhat of a survivalist so I have the general preps covered. My concern now is to have the gear needed to get my bike up and running if it fails far from home. From the research I have been doing since yesterday, a good pump, a couple patches and inner tube, and tire levers are a must. However, in all the pictures I have seen of bikes (must be hundreds by now) I very rarely see a frame mounted pump.

Considering they are a rather large device, where do you keep them? Do you always carry a backpack?

Also, in addition to the items for tire repair that I listed above, what else do you keep with you as far as bike parts? Are there links that can be installed on the road in case your chain brakes? What other items would you recommend?

Thanks!
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Old 07-06-09, 10:00 PM   #2
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If you saw pictures of my bikes the frame pumps would be pretty apparent - one has it in front of the seat tube, one has it behind, and a couple have it under the top tube. But somewhat shorter pumps seem to be in fashion now and can be mounted on the bike alongside a waterbottle holder or carried in a small pack or jersey pocket. Some people rely on CO2 cartridges - but note that CO2 does diffuse through tube rubber much faster than air (and please dispose of these properly - hitting one that's tossed on the road can have bad consequences for a fellow cyclist). My favorite frame pump is still the Zefal HPx, but the regular size Topeak models usually work ok too.

In addition to what you mentioned, I carry a spoke wrench so I can adjust the tension of neighboring spokes if one were to fail, a multi-tool with various allen sizes and a chaintool. I don't carry chain links since 1) chain failures are rare (haven't had one personally in 50 years but I have used the tool to help others), and 2) I'd just shorten the chain if needed and then I'd be very careful in my gear selection for the rest of the ride.
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Old 07-06-09, 10:05 PM   #3
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Thanks for the reply!

So a chain tool is all I need in case the chain brakes. When you say that you're careful with your gear selection for the rest of the ride, I assume you mean that you don't have slack in the chain for the two largest gears so you can't choose those?

Can you recommend a spoke wrench and a chain tool?

Thanks!
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Old 07-06-09, 10:25 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelCity View Post
Thanks for the reply!

So a chain tool is all I need in case the chain brakes. When you say that you're careful with your gear selection for the rest of the ride, I assume you mean that you don't have slack in the chain for the two largest gears so you can't choose those?

Can you recommend a spoke wrench and a chain tool?

Thanks!
I don't leave home without a pump. Each bike has it's own...kind of expensive but at least I don't have to remember to swap pumps all the time

The Moots



The touring bike



The winter slop bike



The commuter



and the Dually



Some have the mount next to the water bottle and some on the top tube. The top tube mount doesn't agree well with most trunk or hitch mounts, however.

For spoke wrenches, I carry the Park triple spoke wrench which will fit anything. For a on bike chaintool, any of several multitools will work. The Park I-beam is about as good as any other.

I'd carry extra Sram powerlinks rather then try to put a chain back together, however. It simpler and stronger.
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Old 07-06-09, 11:23 PM   #5
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+1 on the Zefal hPx. I have two of them, one newish and one at least 15 years old. They work every time, never fail and don't fall off if you buy the right size.
The largest Zefal is too short for the long top tube on my 64cm Atlantis, so I use a Topeak there. It's fairly new, but seems to be as good as the Zefals.
BTW, I've tried a few minipumps and two different CO2 systems. The former are a PITA and the latter won't inflate my 37mm tires adequately, plus you can always have one more flat than you have cartridges.
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Old 07-06-09, 11:27 PM   #6
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I don't leave home without a pump. Each bike has it's own...kind of expensive but at least I don't have to remember to swap pumps all the time

.
Nice bikes...but where is the High Point 955 feet? I live at 4900 feet, with 7500 foot passes in every direction but south, where some go over 9000. I'd have to ride 75 miles to get down to 955 feet, and I'd go over a 7200-ft pass to get there.
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Old 07-06-09, 11:34 PM   #7
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For a patch-kit: Park Tool GP-2

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...t=82&item=GP-2

This is one new 'gimmick' that really, really works. 6-patches in a tiny little plastic latch-box with a square of sandpaper. Clean off around the puncture. Scuff the tube with the sandpaper. Peel off the backing on a patch. Push it down firmly with your palm, or similar, and put your tire/tube on and inflate. Ride.

It's really this simple and it really works. I have one with each of my bikes. Now I don't feel so bad huffing all those tubes of glue!
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Old 07-07-09, 05:15 AM   #8
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Thank you guys, I really appreciate the help!

It seems like the Park brand is a one stop shop for tools.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I'd carry extra Sram powerlinks rather then try to put a chain back together, however. It simpler and stronger.
Is this something that would work with the chain on the Specialized HardRock I am looking to buy?
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Old 07-07-09, 05:37 AM   #9
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Pretty good variety of pumps, here.

http://www.niagaracycle.com/index.php?cPath=120_230
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Old 07-07-09, 06:39 AM   #10
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One vote for the Topeak Road Morph pump. I have several Zefal HPXs, and the Road Morph is much easier to use and get the tire up to sufficient pressure. It comes with a frame-mount bracket but I pack mine in my seat bag. OK, it's a big bag. I've tried those quick patches and my take is they're only good enough to get you a few miles. One 30-mile death march required a hole to be temp-patched 3 times. In fairness, they seem to work better than that for people who have low-pressure tires and fat tubes that don't have to expand to fill the inside of the tire.

I like to carry a quik-link because it's small and I have lots of extras from previous chains. The outer link is always the one to fail, so a QL will *always* fix a chain. I actually had a link fail last week. The chain was relatively new and well-lubed, it just literally came apart two miles into a ride.

Finally, I carry a multi-tool. I only need the basics: a 3,5, and 6mm allen wrench and maybe a phillips. Tire irons are only good for pinching a new tube; if you must use one, use a Quik Stik; it'll zip the tire off without damaging the tube.
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Old 07-07-09, 08:10 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velo Dog View Post
Nice bikes...but where is the High Point 955 feet? I live at 4900 feet, with 7500 foot passes in every direction but south, where some go over 9000. I'd have to ride 75 miles to get down to 955 feet, and I'd go over a 7200-ft pass to get there.
That was on the Katy Trail last spring. My wife and I thought it was hilarious since 955 feet is 2360 feet lower than the lowest point in our state...Colorado
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Old 07-07-09, 08:14 AM   #12
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Is this something that would work with the chain on the Specialized HardRock I am looking to buy?
The Powerlink should work with any chain as long as it's the proper width. In other words, if you have a 9 speed chain, you'll need a 9 speed link or if you have an 8 speed chain you'll need an 8 speed link. Just have the shop install one when you buy the bike if it doesn't already have one and get a spare. It'll make your life a whole lot easier.
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Old 07-07-09, 08:17 AM   #13
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Quote:
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However, in all the pictures I have seen of bikes (must be hundreds by now) I very rarely see a frame mounted pump.

Considering they are a rather large device, where do you keep them? Do you always carry a backpack?
Let's play where's the pump...

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Old 07-07-09, 08:22 AM   #14
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Not sure, UMD. What's with your pedals?

Has anyone made a pump to fit inside the seat tube?
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Old 07-07-09, 08:25 AM   #15
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pedals are speedplay zero, pump is on left side of seat tube next to the water bottle cage. You can see it barely poking out between the seat tube and the tire.


(this picture is not mine, just to illustrate size)
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Old 07-07-09, 08:29 AM   #16
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How many PSI could you get with a pump of that size? How long does it take to fill the tire?

I've been reading pro's and con's of pumps vs. CO2. I gotta admit, CO2 does seem nice. Could you fill the seat tube with spare CO2 cartridges?
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Old 07-07-09, 08:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
Let's play where's the pump...
I am obviously blind...
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Old 07-07-09, 08:41 AM   #18
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Pump works really well. It is a road bike oriented high-pressure/low-volume pump so for a mountain bike or something with fat tires you want a low-pressure/high-volume pump which would be a little bigger. With that pump I can get it up to about 70-80psi fairly quickly, not ideal but enough to get rolling without worrying about a pinch flat.

I've been pretty impressed with Lezyne's stuff, such as:

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Old 07-07-09, 11:12 AM   #19
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Quote:
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I've been reading pro's and con's of pumps vs. CO2. I gotta admit, CO2 does seem nice. Could you fill the seat tube with spare CO2 cartridges?
Sure you could! And, mounted on the frame, a wooden stick with chewed bubble-gum on the end.
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Old 07-07-09, 11:20 AM   #20
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Sure you could! And, mounted on the frame, a wooden stick with chewed bubble-gum on the end.
As I mentioned, I haven't been on a bike in years. Have things changed so much that a man can't pick a bike up and tilt it enough for something to slide out?
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Old 07-07-09, 11:42 AM   #21
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I have a Topeak Road Morph G in a side mount attached to the downtube bottle cage on longer rides. On shorter rides (less than 30 miles) I typically go with two CO2 cartridges and Genuine Innovations MicroFlate.

I use a Crank Bros Multi-19 (the Multi-17 is slightly smaller with two few tool) and (both) have a chain tool (but it requires a bit of leverage to get it to work, but it does work). The chain tool also incorporates a spoke wrench. If you plan on carrying a plan on carrying a chain tool, you may as well carry a few links, the correct link pins, and if possible a SRAM or Wipperman master link.

I carry Park or Pedros tire levers (depends on the bag) a tube and patch kit.
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Old 07-07-09, 12:10 PM   #22
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Quote:
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However, in all the pictures I have seen of bikes (must be hundreds by now) I very rarely see a frame mounted pump.
They are typically removed before pictures are taken.

Sure, it's not realistic, but neither is weighing a bike without bags, computers, bells, mojos, tools, spare tubes, maps, HRMs, watt meters, pedals...or even the motor.
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Old 07-07-09, 12:25 PM   #23
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I've been pretty impressed with Lezyne's stuff, such as:

I recently purchased this pump and it works quite well for such a small pump. The hose is stored inside the pump; you remove it, screw the appropriate end into the pump, and the other end screws onto your valve.

I very much like that the hose screws onto the valve; I hate dealing with the flip up levers on most pumps.
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Old 07-07-09, 01:24 PM   #24
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I recently purchased this pump and it works quite well for such a small pump. The hose is stored inside the pump; you remove it, screw the appropriate end into the pump, and the other end screws onto your valve.

I very much like that the hose screws onto the valve; I hate dealing with the flip up levers on most pumps.
There's a hose in that pump? I had no idea... I'm gonna keep my eyes open for one, then.
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Old 07-07-09, 01:29 PM   #25
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I have a frame-pump - Silca Impero - on my vintage machine. It's gotten a few stares...

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