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Old 08-11-09, 10:22 PM   #1
chico1st
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quality tire levers

is there much variation in tire lever quality?

I have heard bad things about the MEC brand of lever but have trouble beleiving they are really that bad, does tire lever quality really vary that much?
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Old 08-11-09, 10:48 PM   #2
z415
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Yes. There is quality in the material. The shape. How much leverage it gives you. Strength of design. Versatility. Unfortunately, there isn't really one that does meets all of that admirably.
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Old 08-12-09, 12:42 AM   #3
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Soma steel-core levers are nice, I have those. Have also heard good things about Park tire levers.
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Old 08-12-09, 05:00 AM   #4
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The VAR Super-Tyre Tool (British import) weighs next to nothing. It fits easily in a small seat-bag or pocket. And it makes getting super-tight clinchers on/off the rims a breeze. A larger one is the Kool Stop Tire-Jack - which is really too big to carry - works on the same Archimedes principle.

I suggest that if you purchase, copy down the instructions on the seller's website. The guy is honest and fast - no worry buying from him.

http://cgi.ebay.com/VAR-Super-Tyre-T...4.c0.m14.l1262
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Old 08-12-09, 05:14 AM   #5
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I have the Portland Design Works 3 Wrencho and love it! It is metal so you have to be a little careful on the rim, but I hear they are coming out with a rubber covered one sometime. http://www.ridepdw.com/goods/tools/3wrenchoraw
On my other bikes, I have the Pedro's yellow levers. Those things are tough plastic and you can get a good grip on them.
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Old 08-12-09, 05:50 AM   #6
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I use the Spin Doctor steel core levers. Plastic with a steel core, fat enough to get a good grip on, alloy-friendly, and not too heavy to throw a pair in my seat bag.

I also picked up a Crank Brothers Speed lever recently, and I have to admit, it's a sweet tool. Fast and surprisingly easy, even with some tight tires.
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Old 08-12-09, 11:32 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by SystemShock View Post
Soma steel-core levers are nice, I have those. Have also heard good things about Park tire levers.
I have the plastic Park Tools tire levers and have never had a problem with them.

I've heard of people breaking the plastic levers while trying to mount a tire with a rigid sidewall, like a Specialized Armadillo. I've had no such problem, not even close, which leads me to believe those people don't know how to properly change a tire.
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Old 08-12-09, 12:00 PM   #8
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Growing up, I always used the handles of a couple of large spoons. Now, I try very hard not to use levers at all, whether fitting or removing the tyre, unless absolutely necessary. Maybe there are rims where this isn't an option.
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Old 08-12-09, 01:34 PM   #9
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Growing up, I always used the handles of a couple of large spoons. Now, I try very hard not to use levers at all, whether fitting or removing the tyre, unless absolutely necessary. Maybe there are rims where this isn't an option.
I've tried that but cant do it with most of my tires.
I deflate the tire and just start to pull.. i dont have a low center on my rim on which to squeeze the tire into.
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Old 08-12-09, 01:44 PM   #10
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That's where the VAR excels - for those ultra-tight tire-rim combos. Check out the physics. I'll never use a traditional tire-iron again. It fits on one side of the rim, while the other side is a hook that captures the bead on the side that won't pop into place. Then you pull back and the bead is pulled up and dropped into the rim.

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Old 08-12-09, 01:46 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
The VAR Super-Tyre Tool (British import) weighs next to nothing. It fits easily in a small seat-bag or pocket. And it makes getting super-tight clinchers on/off the rims a breeze. A larger one is the Kool Stop Tire-Jack - which is really too big to carry - works on the same Archimedes principle.

I suggest that if you purchase, copy down the instructions on the seller's website. The guy is honest and fast - no worry buying from him.

http://cgi.ebay.com/VAR-Super-Tyre-T...4.c0.m14.l1262
I second the VAR...

I got mine from the North Road Bicycle Imports in Yancyville NC.

They just got a shipment of the Var tire jacks in. I don't believe that they
advertise them on their website www.northroadbicycle.com.

I used their toll free phone number 800 321 5511

Jerry
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Old 08-12-09, 03:34 PM   #12
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Since u're in Toronto. Check out the Canadian Tire ones. They are quite good. I've used them a few times now. Solid and unlike metal will not nick your rims.
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