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  1. #26
    Senior Member mijome07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    People don't seem to use dropped bars on mountain bikes. For road riding, I'd say they both are equally manueverable but upright is a bit more secure (generally) for rougher/tricker riding.
    I've seen many setups of drop bars on mountain bikes for 'cross, touring, mountain biking, commuting, etc. I was going to do the same with a Trek 820, but ended up selling it.

  2. #27
    Conquer Cancer rider Boudicca's Avatar
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    It sounds like you have made up your mind already. You want us to say "Great."

    As for the maneuverability of bikes, the wider handlebars can be an issue when you try things like those awkward gates on multi-use trails. Don't ask me how I know this one, but I found out the painful way.

    And you can have drop handlebars at a level above your seat anyway.

    Have you tried both types of bike?
    Zero gallons to the mile

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    What about the 30/39/50 crank (11-26 cassette) of the Quick 2 versus the 26/36/48 (11-32) of the more economical Quick 3 for the type of riding that I'm planning to do? I may encounter some steep climbs every once in a while where I live so I'm liking the Quick 3 for that but I don't want to give up too much speed (Quick 2 also has Shimano 105 RD and lighter wheels I believe).
    Generally speaking, people run out of low gears before they run out of high gears. The Quick 3 has quite low gears. You might want to use the gear calculator on www.sheldonbrown.com and run some numbers.

    The 3 is listed as having a 11-26 cassette.

    I run 52/42/30 and 11-32 on my touring bike. That works out fine for me on fairly steep/long hills on day rides. I don't think I've ever used the highest gears!

    Quote Originally Posted by mijome07 View Post
    I've seen many setups of drop bars on mountain bikes for 'cross, touring, mountain biking, commuting, etc. I was going to do the same with a Trek 820, but ended up selling it.
    I don't think many people use drop bars for actual mountain biking. (Touring and commuting are usually road riding.) (People who really ride cross courses are crazy!)

    For what the original poster is talking about, dropped bars might be preferrable.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 08-24-09 at 06:00 PM.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boudicca View Post
    It sounds like you have made up your mind already. You want us to say "Great."

    As for the maneuverability of bikes, the wider handlebars can be an issue when you try things like those awkward gates on multi-use trails. Don't ask me how I know this one, but I found out the painful way.

    And you can have drop handlebars at a level above your seat anyway.

    Have you tried both types of bike?
    I know there's no "perfect" bike, I just want to know the thoughts of more experienced users to avoid making a decision I'll later regret. Of course I want you guys to say "Great". It would mean I did a fine job of researching and selecting the correct bike. If you say I'd be better off with drop bars it would mean I'll have to start the process all over again to find the "perfect" drop bars bike for me.

    I have not tried drop bars ever. I've always seen them as racing bikes for very serious athletes. Guess I'm wrong seeing how popular they are among everyone here...

  5. #30
    Senior Member mijome07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    I don't think many people use drop bars for actual mountain biking. (People who really ride cross courses are crazy!)
    Yeah, not many, but some. Someday I'll get into racing.

  6. #31
    Conquer Cancer rider Boudicca's Avatar
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    I am far from a serious athlete. I don't ride fast, although I have started riding relatively far. The thought of drop bars terrified me at first. And now I can't imagine riding without them.

    The flat-bar road bikes like the ones you are looking at are good bikes, but don't rule out the drops, especially for those bikes with a more "relaxed" fit. They may work.
    Zero gallons to the mile

  7. #32
    Senior Member mijome07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    I know there's no "perfect" bike, I just want to know the thoughts of more experienced users to avoid making a decision I'll later regret. Of course I want you guys to say "Great". It would mean I did a fine job of researching and selecting the correct bike. If you say I'd be better off with drop bars it would mean I'll have to start the process all over again to find the "perfect" drop bars bike for me.

    I have not tried drop bars ever. I've always seen them as racing bikes for very serious athletes. Guess I'm wrong seeing how popular they are among everyone here...
    I say go to your local bike shop(s) and test ride some bikes within your budget. You will not regret getting a road bike. At least I assume you won't. If you're apprehensive about the drop bars, you can always have 'cross levers installed. Some road bikes come with them already installed.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mijome07 View Post
    Yeah, not many, but some.
    The crazy few!
    Quote Originally Posted by mijome07 View Post
    Someday I'll get into racing.
    Good luck.

  9. #34
    Senior Member mijome07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    The crazy few!

    Good luck.
    Thanks.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    I know there's no "perfect" bike, I just want to know the thoughts of more experienced users to avoid making a decision I'll later regret. Of course I want you guys to say "Great". It would mean I did a fine job of researching and selecting the correct bike. If you say I'd be better off with drop bars it would mean I'll have to start the process all over again to find the "perfect" drop bars bike for me.

    I have not tried drop bars ever. I've always seen them as racing bikes for very serious athletes. Guess I'm wrong seeing how popular they are among everyone here...
    You might be better off. People who ride longer distances (racing or not) tend to use dropped bars.

    Note that most people generally ride the dropped bars with their hands on the "trunks" of the brake levers (called the "hoods").

    Honestly, you aren't going to make a big mistake with the Quick. If you want a flat handle bar bike, it's a good choice. The Quick isn't going to be substantially slower than a dropped bar bike.

    Note that you might not want a real "racing" bike.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 08-24-09 at 06:18 PM.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Kimmitt's Avatar
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    Well, I'm glad someone's keeping the bike companies in business, but $1200 for a hybrid?
    I see unexamined people. All the time. I don't think they know they're unexamined.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimmitt View Post
    Well, I'm glad someone's keeping the bike companies in business, but $1200 for a hybrid?
    It's not a hybrid. It's a road bike with flat bars and wider tires. (Like my touring bike but with flat bars.)

    A friend of mine runs a Synapse with upright bars. It's not a hybrid either.

  13. #38
    cyclepath daredevil's Avatar
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    didn't have time to wade through all the threads....

    about the dog walking, it depends on how well the dog is trained. I have no trouble at all walking or running my dog with any bike I want. That device you want looks gimmicky to me and I don't think it would work without a dog pretty well trained to walk already. Not sure why that wouldn't work with any bike you want to put it on anyway.

    as far as hybrid, the easiest answer is you need more than one bike but speaking from experience, I have all kinds of bikes from road to hybrid and they all work great. I'm sure you'll love the hybrid.
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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil View Post
    the easiest answer is you need more than one bike
    I was kind of getting to that conclusion myself from all the reading I've done today...

  15. #40
    Senior Member chipcom's Avatar
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    You are not going to like riding 20-30 miles with your friends if your wrists are hurting, your hands are falling asleep and you have to work twice as hard as they do because you are like a parachute in an upright, spread-armed position. You can get a relaxed geometry and upright position drop-bar bike in your price range. You will appreciate the variety of hand positions and especially in the wind.

    If you want something to walk the dog, get a cheap hybrid just for that...personally, when I want to walk my dogs I walk them...if I want them to ride with me, they go into a basket or trailer.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  16. #41
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    Flat bar road bikes (also called 'Performance Hybrids') are great bikes.
    Road bikes (or 'Racing' bikes) are also great, but a little limited in their use - often a there is little room for fatter tires or fenders, often a very stretched out position).

    THe true kings of the road (and path and trail) are Cyclocross and Touring bikes - drop handlebars, room for fat tires for rougher roads.

    Any style of bike can be good if you find one that fits your body and riding style. Touring bikes are becoming more and more common in more upright, relaxed rider position.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom View Post
    You are not going to like riding 20-30 miles with your friends if your wrists are hurting, your hands are falling asleep and you have to work twice as hard as they do because you are like a parachute in an upright, spread-armed position.
    Oh I don't know. My wife and I went on a week long tour last month that averaged 60 mile days. There was a woman on the trip who rode the whole thing on a flat handlebar bike (with streamers). She never looked slow or tired to me.

    Somebody else made mention of $1,200 for a flat bar road bike. Pay $1,200 for a dropped handlebar road bike and nobody would give it a second thought. So what's the difference?

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom View Post
    You are not going to like riding 20-30 miles with your friends if your wrists are hurting, your hands are falling asleep and you have to work twice as hard as they do because you are like a parachute in an upright, spread-armed position. You can get a relaxed geometry and upright position drop-bar bike in your price range. You will appreciate the variety of hand positions and especially in the wind.

    If you want something to walk the dog, get a cheap hybrid just for that...personally, when I want to walk my dogs I walk them...if I want them to ride with me, they go into a basket or trailer.
    The idea of walking the dog is to exercise him. I live in an apartment and my dog is a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. This breed needs a lot of exercise. I need to drain his energy or he'll become very hyper inside the apartment and maybe even destructive. I give him one 20 minute walk in the morning and another one in the afternoon every day but sometimes I just wish I could just run him for 5-10 minutes without having to get all sweaty myself. It's actually recommended by dog trainers.

    I'm not going to spend money on 2 bikes until I'm sure I'm going to stick with it for real so Ideally I'd get a $350 hybrid now to walk the dog and the occassional ride with friends and then get a real road bike once I know for sure that I'll be serious about it. The thing is that if I get one with cheap components I'm much more likely to quit than if I get a good one.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    if i get one with cheap components i'm much more likely to quit than if i get a good one.
    + 1000000

  20. #45
    cyclepath daredevil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    The idea of walking the dog is to exercise him. I live in an apartment and my dog is a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. This breed needs a lot of exercise. I need to drain his energy or he'll become very hyper inside the apartment and maybe even destructive. I give him one 20 minute walk in the morning and another one in the afternoon every day but sometimes I just wish I could just run him for 5-10 minutes without having to get all sweaty myself. It's actually recommended by dog trainers.
    walking a dog by bike can work really well if you're lucky enough to have a cooperative dog. I have a dog like that right now. He could ride in the trailer with his sister if he wanted but he much prefers hoofing it himself. I let him set the pace and he'll go anywhere from 6-15 mph depending on his mood and I swear he could go all day if we let him.

    You have a lucky dog with an owner so attentive to its needs. Believe it or not, the best bike to walk a dog with, at least initially, is a flat foot bike. No worries about tipping over at all.
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  21. #46
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    I would go for the Quick 3 which has a more useful gear range.

    You can add bar-ends and aerobars to the flat bars.
    You can change the flat bar to a Jones bar (Titec H-bar) or Trekking bar (or others) to provide multiple hand positions and utilize the existing shifters / brake levers. You could actually add trekking bars & racks to that bike and tour across the US.

    Many of us here have multiple bikes but the type of bike you are looking at can do 100% of what you want to do now and serve you well into the future, even if you do at some point decide to try drop bars.

    Go for it!
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  22. #47
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    I have a cyclocross. with drop bars 28 mm tires, 22-36-46 chainrings and either 12-23 or 12-26 cassette depending on hills. The tires are wide enough for most unpaved trails and roll easily over potholes. The bars are about level with the seat. I have seen a much better dog attachment, which has a springy "U" on the side of the rear rack - if the dog pulls to the side the force is applied a lot lower on the bike, so is easier to control. I have only seen one example in use, but it seemed effective.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil View Post
    walking a dog by bike can work really well if you're lucky enough to have a cooperative dog. I have a dog like that right now. He could ride in the trailer with his sister if he wanted but he much prefers hoofing it himself. I let him set the pace and he'll go anywhere from 6-15 mph depending on his mood and I swear he could go all day if we let him.

    You have a lucky dog with an owner so attentive to its needs. Believe it or not, the best bike to walk a dog with, at least initially, is a flat foot bike. No worries about tipping over at all.
    Getting a flat foot bike is not on my plans, I can't wait to walk him. He's still a 4.5 month old puppy though. I think I have to wait 2 more months before giving him that kind of exercise. Do you use the Walky Dog?

    Quote Originally Posted by stormchaser View Post
    I would go for the Quick 3 which has a more useful gear range.

    You can add bar-ends and aerobars to the flat bars.
    You can change the flat bar to a Jones bar (Titec H-bar) or Trekking bar (or others) to provide multiple hand positions and utilize the existing shifters / brake levers. You could actually add trekking bars & racks to that bike and tour across the US.

    Many of us here have multiple bikes but the type of bike you are looking at can do 100% of what you want to do now and serve you well into the future, even if you do at some point decide to try drop bars.

    Go for it!
    Thanks!! I'm going to save this for future reference when/if I decide to upgrade.

  24. #49
    cyclepath daredevil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agc1976 View Post
    Getting a flat foot bike is not on my plans, I can't wait to walk him. He's still a 4.5 month old puppy though. I think I have to wait 2 more months before giving him that kind of exercise. Do you use the Walky Dog?
    I wouldn't get a flat foot bike either, my wife has one so it was handy to have around. Our dog is 10 months old now and I didn't start seriously trying to walk him with the bike until the last month. I simply use a retractable leash. I am careful of course to not have the leash handle on the handlebar at the wrong time...that's when you could have problems.

    Now, I hardly even need the leash but I keep it on in case. He trots along next to the bike within an arms reach. He knows to stay on the right always. It's a gas man. I love it and so does Crash.
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  25. #50
    Senior Member Nachoman's Avatar
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    What happens to you and your bike, with that funky dog walking contraption, when your dog decides to chase a cat, or stops or turns suddenly for some reason?
    .
    .

    Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.

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