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  1. #1
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    security measure

    hello,
    i was wondering if anyone out there use sheldon brown's locking method? i followed his instruction of locking the rear wheel to a pole inside that triangle area. but i was also wondering if thief could just pop my rear quick release and take the whole bike without the rear wheel away. is that possible? i didn't get his sheldon's explanation and have been thinking about it, any clue??

  2. #2
    CRIKEY!!!!!!! Cyclaholic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheasie View Post
    hello,
    i was wondering if anyone out there use sheldon brown's locking method? i followed his instruction of locking the rear wheel to a pole inside that triangle area. but i was also wondering if thief could just pop my rear quick release and take the whole bike without the rear wheel away. is that possible? i didn't get his sheldon's explanation and have been thinking about it, any clue??
    Try it at home. Lock the part of the back rim inside the rear triangle to a post and try to take the rest of the bike. I'll bet you $2 that you can't.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    If genuinely worried about it, you can do one (or multiple) of the following:

    • Buy some locking skewers (Pitlocks, Pinheads), install those on the wheels, seat post, and possibly the top headset bolt to keep someone from jacking the fork.
    • Carry around a cable that you wrap around the frame and both wheels, and attach both ends to the primary lock. This is easily cuttable, but it gives some sort of visible deterrent to tell a thief that he either is to break out the tools or find another bike to attack.


    So far, I've heard of nobody who has used SB's method of locking have a bike stolen, unless the bike was locked to a surface that could be easily cut or pried open. However, if you are worried about your bike, there are always other locking methods, such as mechBgon's.

  4. #4
    Frame Catastrophizer mikewille's Avatar
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    Unless you can fit your entire rear wheel through the rear triangle,
    your bike is secure.

  5. #5
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    Only way they could steal it is if they cut the wheel and tire and slipped it off the lock that way, but that'd be a lot of trouble. Also, they could use a small jack to break the lock so it's always good to use a small lock or at least a narrow lock that prevents someone from putting something in it to break it.
    Demented internet tail wagging imbicile.

  6. #6
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    good to hear guys, i just need to reassure my doubts haha.
    i bought a pair of locking skewers and replaced the front quick release, but the rear one was too long for my univega, is it possible to buy washers to fill that gap? or i have to get a new rear locking skewer?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Nermal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewille View Post
    Unless you can fit your entire rear wheel through the rear triangle,
    your bike is secure.
    Un huh. They'd have to cut the rear wheel and tire in at least one place. Imagine the look on someone's face when the hit a road bike tire at 120psi - right next to their little face.
    Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.

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