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Old 08-02-04, 11:31 AM   #26
Radworld
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"Your left" is all thats required in my book. If somebody is on the streets and haven't come across that they should be pushing that bike not riding it. and...10 MINUTES! I would have died in shame knowing I was blocking someone for 10 minutes I always view it more as a courtesy to the other biker then a "request"...announcing "I'm coming through"...give the courtesy 1-3 second and then pedal on by. That is unless the tower tells you that the pattern is full...but Maverick did anyway.
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Old 08-02-04, 12:53 PM   #27
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Yes, I had a smart@ssed roadie say the same thing to me when I was a newbie just starting out on a heavily used rails to trails path. 'Course, never having heard the phrase, I thought I was being told to get on my left. After a number of these experiences, I'd think ya'll would be smart enough to change your call out when riding around inexperienced folks. But, I guess you are not. It's easier to be lazy and get that chance to be snide.


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Originally Posted by Flyingsquid
I rarely ever give an "on your left" anymore unless I really feel like I have to. I usually slow down & they can normally hear that I'm there. I wish I had a dollar for every time that I have yelled "On Your Left" only to have them MOVE to the left. I then usually give them a "No, your OTHER Left".
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Old 08-02-04, 02:18 PM   #28
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I used to say "on your left" but I decided that "passing on your left" was a lot more explanatory. So that's what I use now.
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Old 08-02-04, 03:04 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by capsicum
they used to have these little yellow battery powered handlebar mounted jobs when I was a kid, they had a switch to select PA(like a weak megaphone) or a choice of police, fire truck or ambulance sirens. Man those were fun. Try toys R us I think they came from there.
I *so* wanted one of those back in the day. The ones I saw were at Radio Shack.
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Old 08-02-04, 03:39 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by SteveE
I used to say "on your left" but I decided that "passing on your left" was a lot more explanatory. So that's what I use now.

I started doing the same thing. I've had too many people move to their left when I said "your left" or "on your left". Sometimes I'll just shorten it to "passing left".

I'm pretty good about giving warnings, but I don't always do it. I kinda assess the situation and if there's a chance the person needs a warning, then I give it. On those occasions where I see they have their headphones on, then I just skip it. But I'm also very careful to check behind me when passing because of the people that won't warn when passing and then try to pass a bunch of people just as they are about to pass some walkers.

This weekend I had this guy pass me without warning three times. Each time just about scared the crap outta me and I ended up veering around a bit. He just came up so suddenly. I usually check behind me at regular intervals, but each time he timed it perfectly so that I wasn't checking behind me. The funny thing was that he would pass me, then I'd see him pulled over to the side about a mile down the path, then he'd pass me again, then I'd pass him pulled over. By then I was getting totally paranoid and was looking over my shoulder ever 10 seconds. Kinda pissed me off. But in the end, he ended up looking totally stupid. He passed me the last time, just totally flying. Unfortunately, he'd left his saddle bag unzipped and just as he passed me, his cell phone fell out and was bouncing all over the path. I had to veer around to avoid it. So I yelled "Hey, you dropped your cell phone". He didn't hear me, so yelled louder because he was really haulling butt. This time he heard me, but thought I was chewing him out or something. So he slams on his brakes and turns around like he's ready to fight and says "What??!!!" I just roll past him quietly and say, "Your cell phone or something fell outta your saddle bag" and kept spinning easily by. Course by then, he'd gone almost 500 yards past where it fell out and it was a pretty wooded area, so I'm sure he had a fun time finding it. He eventually passed me again about 5 miles later and thanked me.


And then last week I had an incident that actually almost resulted in an accident. I was following two guys right after we all had to wait at a road crossing. It was a pretty busy street and eventually the light changed and we all rolled out on the bike path. It was a pretty wooded and curvy part of the path and even though I could go faster than them, I held back and waited to pass until the path straightened out. As we are going around one of the curves (a left curve) I take a line that sorta took me into the left lane, but since I could see far enough ahead I wasn't worried about oncoming traffic. Right as I start to take the turn I just sorta felt a presense, and yep.. some dork on a tri-bike was trying to blow by us all right in a curve, but wasn't up to giving us a warning. I almost turned right into him. Luckily I recovered without crashing. He said he was sorry and I just said, "Hey, that's cool, just give me a little warning next time" and let it be. Unfortunately, I've seen this guy several times before and he never gives warnings. I suppose if I'd run him off the road, he might re-think that policy.
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Old 08-03-04, 02:22 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by forum*rider
On a short ride today I was trying to pass a younger couple who were completely oblivious to the fact that I was sitting behind them yelling "on your left" and "Please move to the right", after about 10 minutes of this I just moved to the far left side and passed them. To make a long story short the couple caught up to me after a few stoplights and started lecturing me about how I should have waited longer until they saw me then passed them.

Im just wondering if I was right to pass them or should I have waited longer? Also is there some kind of small megaphone that you can clip onto your bike? Im sure that would come in handy.

What controlled substance were they smoking? Do these people expect SUVs, SEMIS, autos, ambulances, etc to wait until these people deigned to "see them" before they are passed? I usually am happy if a passing vehicle does not attempt to scare the bejesus out of me . That being said, saying "on your left" is a courtesy. You can pass anytime you think you can do it safely and many people will pass without warning and without much of a safe margin. There is a downside to yelling out the warning "on your left" and that is many rookie riders will look over their left shoulder causing their balance to shift which makes them drift left a couple of feet. So depending on how I size people up, sometimes I pass without the warning figuring it might be safer to do the "stealth" approach.

By the way, these people were pretty toxic. You gave them the warning. Now courteous riders, if they are riding 2 abreast, will shift over to allow an overtaking cyclist to pass them. I never ever wait 10 minutes to pass someone. 10 seconds is more like it. I am amazed you waited back there that long. I am also surprised that these people had the chutzpah to catch you and lecture you on your bicycling ettiquette when they were not being courteous themselves.

Was this on a "bike path"? There is all sorts of abberrant behavior on bike paths which is a good reason to avoid them.
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Old 08-03-04, 10:53 AM   #32
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It's funny what people expect for courtesy when you pass them on a path. I have a path Nazi I am dealing with currently on my commute. She expects me to "Announce my presence" (her exact words) whether she is on the path or not. It's annoying for the simple fact that I have been courteous to her but haven't had the courtesy returned. I posted a thread recently about my first tangle with her in the commuting section of this forum.
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Old 08-04-04, 08:45 AM   #33
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I like using the bell which seldom gives me negative results, and I have a air horn for real emergencies. There's a heavily used rail-trail near Chicago paralleling a busy rail line. When a freight comes rumbling through about the only way you can warn anybody your intentions to pass is from a slight blast of the air horn. Occasionally when I have given a verbal warning "On your left" instead of using the bell I've had people actually go to the left. Of course, kids are very unpredictable like most of you already now; you never know what they're going to do.
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Old 08-04-04, 09:29 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveE
I used to say "on your left" but I decided that "passing on your left" was a lot more explanatory. So that's what I use now.
That's pretty good! I have come accustomed to saying "Coming up on your left!" That usually works really well. Most of the time if they look like they are enjoying themselves and not moving around a bunch, I just pass them. What REALLY pi$$es me off is when some jerkoff doesn't have their dog on a leash and I just about have to run them over to get past them, because the stupid mutts just keep moving in front of me. Just as bad is KIDS that need to be told where the he!! to walk.
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Old 08-04-04, 03:34 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by rykoala
That's pretty good! I have come accustomed to saying "Coming up on your left!" That usually works really well. Most of the time if they look like they are enjoying themselves and not moving around a bunch, I just pass them. What REALLY pi$$es me off is when some jerkoff doesn't have their dog on a leash and I just about have to run them over to get past them, because the stupid mutts just keep moving in front of me. Just as bad is KIDS that need to be told where the he!! to walk.

Or when they do have their dog on a leash, but it's one of those 20 foot leashes that expand... and the dog is totally across the path, but the leash goes directly across the path so you can't pass no matter what.
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Old 08-04-04, 06:03 PM   #36
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Old 08-04-04, 10:57 PM   #37
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I just practice what I'd like to have happen to me.
Announce. Always.
"Passing on your left." Many people simply don't know what "on your left" means. I've been riding railtrails for the pass 7 years and I've never had anyone stay in my way that's heard me.
This year, in particular, I've had numerous people thank me for calling out my pass. From reading the previous posts it looks like that's a dying art.
This year I've noticed for the first time a few people talking on their cell phones while riding. I suspect NOT announcing a pass with them could be a problem.
Sometimes when I'm riding I'm in la-la land, and when they don't announce the pass it just about scares the bejeus out of me.
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Old 08-05-04, 12:20 AM   #38
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I usually announce my presence with a cheerful, "passing left" or "on your left" or something. If the person looks like a 'serious bicyclist' I usually just give a "on yer left" and smile as I pass, if they are younger, or look inexperienced (as if I can actually tell), I give something more descriptive, like "Passing on your left", which a few people have suggested. I try to wave to people after I pass too, to make sure they know I appreciated their moving aside.

Funny story.. The other day I went out to go riding with my girlfriend and another friend of ours. I was on my GT mtb, knobbied out, my gf was on rollerblades, and our other friend was on her old schwinn roadie. It was just a little lazy ride around the bike path at the park, so I amused myself by riding in the grass, over logs, through construction zones, over hills, etc, basically playing around next to the path while the girls stuck to the path and made good time.

I crested a big hill and came down after them, going through a big rocky construction area, and my girlfriend starts jokingly shouting, "SHOWOFF!!" from the path. I didn't respond because I was busy on the rocks, but I eventually caught back up to them. When I finally did, she was mad at me, because she said that all the other people on the busy trail were looking at her completely horrified, thinking she was shouting 'show off!' at a complete stranger!

So if for some reason someone looks like they are being an ass, maybe its just because they think they recognize you.

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Old 08-05-04, 01:50 AM   #39
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I don't recommend a whistle. I just had a guy blow a whistle in my ear yesterday and it was very very very very very very unpleasant.

No whistles, no whistling, no shouting.

Either get a bell or say CALMLY: "On your Left (or right)" right as you are going to pass.
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Old 08-05-04, 04:18 AM   #40
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I have a bell for emergencies, but usually I just click my brake levers. If my timing is right, I will be close enough for them to hear and they will also be able to determine which way I'm passing. I will only do this if the way is totally blocked (a dog leash across the path or people walking / riding side by side). If there's a clear path pass them, I will use it and not announce my presence.

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Old 08-05-04, 10:56 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingsquid
I rarely ever give an "on your left" anymore unless I really feel like I have to. I usually slow down & they can normally hear that I'm there. I wish I had a dollar for every time that I have yelled "On Your Left" only to have them MOVE to the left. I then usually give them a "No, your OTHER Left".
I hear ya. "On your left" works about 60% of the time when I ride my local bike path. If/when people are confused I follow up with "Bicycle coming through." However, if the cyclists or pedestrians seem to be staying to the right, I often won't say anything before I pass rather than risk having them veer left in front of me. With large families and rollerblading couples, I just yell "Bicycle coming through" (skipping "On your left" altogether) and let them decide which way they want to move... unfortunately, in the case of large families, there's usually some confusion (parents tell their kids which way to move etc) and I have to slow to a walking pace.
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Old 08-05-04, 02:06 PM   #42
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It really must be the season ... yesterday I got caught behind a couple rollerblading ... there were 4 lanes to this path and they were literally weaving in and out of all four lanes ... after one "on your left" and no response I simply yelled "get out of my way" and passed as close to the male as I could
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Old 08-05-04, 07:22 PM   #43
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At least 90% of the people on our trail look over their right shoulder as you warn them "On your left".
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Old 08-05-04, 08:03 PM   #44
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I minimize the problems associated with on yer left (OYL) by:

1. Avoiding MUPs as much as possible (once a year is my limit)
2. Sizing up riders ahead to figure out if they'll have a clue what "on yer left" means.
- Proper kit and riding clean, they'll know what OYL means.
- High-vis safety vest, mud guards and other things that scream "advocate", they'll admonish you if you don't call OYL .
- Commuter bike w/mud guards, etc... and riding clean, they'll know what OYL means.
- New bike, saddle too high or too low, helmet back and tires low on air, 50/50 chance they'll know. Give wide berth and an OYL.
- ATB/Comfort bike, sneakers, & shorts riding two abreast and gabbing, not a clue - give wide berth.
- Older couple on new bikes without helmets, not a clue - give wide berth.
- Family riding as a group without helmets, not a clue - give wide berth.
- Roller bladers who look unsteady, not a clue - give wide berth.
- Anyone with a headset, why bother - give wide berth.
- Fat tire bikes, tennis shoes & shorts, steer wide.
- Anyone down in Aerobars in an urban area, drafting, or on a MUP, what the hell is that all about.

Sorry to stereotype, but it's usually a safe bet that if you've been riding for a few years you'll be able to figure out when OYL will be a prudent call and when it will just invite trouble. In regard to the latter, OYL is usually muttered at the last minute just to keep the "on your left" zealots from nagging you for poor etiquette, even when in your judgement doing so is ill advised.
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Old 08-05-04, 09:27 PM   #45
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Ok, this beats all for me. Yesterday I ended behind a car. Some old lady was going maybe 20mph in a 35. I was keeping pace right off her bumper for about half a mile before she slowly started to creep ahead, then I turned off. I was tempted to pass her but I was on my way to help a friend move stuff into his apartment, so I saved my strength. I don't think she would've heard the "on your left" anyway.
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Old 08-05-04, 09:36 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forum*rider
On a short ride today I was trying to pass a younger couple who were completely oblivious to the fact that I was sitting behind them yelling "on your left" and "Please move to the right", after about 10 minutes of this I just moved to the far left side and passed them. To make a long story short the couple caught up to me after a few stoplights and started lecturing me about how I should have waited longer until they saw me then passed them.

Im just wondering if I was right to pass them or should I have waited longer? Also is there some kind of small megaphone that you can clip onto your bike? Im sure that would come in handy.
I have given up yelling it. But here are the results of "on your left"

a) people go left...so many tourists loose their brains on the plan on the way up here
b) if they are on the right (euro's for example) and I yell "on your right" in order to make them not move (being nice)...they jump right
c) they split into many groups and look scared
d) they don't hear you, listen or know what the heck you are talking about
e) they move correctly but have some dumb restarted dog with no leash (owners at this point are dumber than dogs) that just runs back and forth and then pees on the ground
f) 5% of the time...they stay left and have a leash on their dog

Now I just ride along, keep an eye out for dogs and fly past peds in the hopes of making them realize that walking on the right is the same as driving. I do have to say I don't ride on paved trails much anymore and avoid busy trails to save my life. Single track or DH but no casual fun rides on any trails regular people know of. Too dangerous.
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Old 08-05-04, 09:50 PM   #47
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Well, I'v been sticking to my mtb recently and it seems like there are alot less "on your left" zealots as livngood put it.

The few times I have been on the roadie I just kind of melded in with a bunch of guys on a group ride. Luckily enough they were friendly and let me ride with them, seems like the OYL freaks don't harass group rides as much as they harass individual riders.
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Old 08-06-04, 03:15 AM   #48
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I've been pretty lucky on the bike. I will yell "passing on your left" when cyling on a MUP. If I don't get their attention, I'll ride on the grass around them. Now walking on the sidewalk is another story. On several occasions, people coming towards me don't want to share the sidewalk, especially if there is 2 of them. So, now I just walk to the right and run into them. They are usually so startled that I didn't move for them, that they just rub their shoulder and cuss. If the sidewalk is divided in half, and you or your party is taking up more than your share, move your a$$ over or wait for me to pass. Get it. I am not moving off the sidewalk when you could scoot over.
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Old 08-06-04, 08:07 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by SteveE
I used to say "on your left" but I decided that "passing on your left" was a lot more explanatory. So that's what I use now.

Thats exactly what I yell too.
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Old 08-06-04, 08:47 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by beowoulfe
At least 90% of the people on our trail look over their right shoulder as you warn them "On your left".
I wonder if that 90%/10% breakdown corresponds to right-handed/left-handed people. Is there a scientist in the house?
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