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Old 02-20-10, 12:22 AM   #1
slipknot0129
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Is this the correct way to shift my bike?

I got a touring bike with alot of gears. It has 9 in the back and 3 in the front. On my bike ive been shifting by pushing the shifter however many times I want to gear to to up or down to. So if I wanted to go up 5 gears I push the shifter 5 times really fast. Will shifting too fast mess up the back gears or anything? Sometimes I might want to go from a really low gear to a really high gear as fast as possible.
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Old 02-20-10, 12:30 AM   #2
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I start my bike in a high gear and I just read that its bad to do that,why?
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Old 02-20-10, 12:30 AM   #3
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What bike is it?
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Old 02-20-10, 12:31 AM   #4
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I start my bike in a high gear and I just read that its bad to do that,why?
High gears for new riders is hard on your knees. Called mashing.
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Old 02-20-10, 12:33 AM   #5
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Before we begin, are we meaning the same thing when we say "high" and "low?" A lot of new riders confuse the two. Shifting UP to a HIGHER gear means the pedals get harder to push and you need fewer revolutions for a given speed. Shifting DOWN to a LOWER gear means you spin like crazy, but it's easier to pedal. It's pretty rare to go from "a really low gear to a really high gear as fast as possible," but pretty common to want to go in the other direction when you come to a hill and need to shift DOWN to climb it.

Having said that, if the chain is moving smoothly across the cassette (rear gears), you're fine. It's a good idea generally to "soft pedal" (keep the cranks turning, but reduce pressure for a revolution or so) when you shift, but modern drivelines are pretty forgiving. You aren't going to break the gears in any case, but you can put stress on the derailleur and chain if you shift violently. Don't worry about it much--it's all fixable, and everything breaks eventually.
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Old 02-20-10, 12:38 AM   #6
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Can you shift the crank and the back at the same time or is it best to shift crank first then shift the back? Its probably best to keep my crank in the middle one.

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Old 02-20-10, 12:41 AM   #7
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@ 10 wheels its a Cannondale touring
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Old 02-20-10, 07:57 AM   #8
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Can you shift the crank and the back at the same time or is it best to shift crank first then shift the back? Its probably best to keep my crank in the middle one.
i frequently drop a gear on my crankset and shift up on my cassette at the same time... hasnt given me any trouble... you'll find that you have 1 chain ring on the bike that you prefer, either the middle or the big ring and rarely leave it... (IMO...)
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Old 02-20-10, 08:55 AM   #9
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I often shift 3 or 4 cogs at a time with my Campagnolo 10 speed. It can do that with one push of the lever. So, shifting one at a time, even very fast, won't be a problem.

Shifting both the front to the small chainring and the back at the same time can occasionally cause the chain to overshoot and fall off the chainring. I try to shift one, then the other, but I do shift both simultaneously at times. It's been a year or more since I dropped a chain.
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Old 02-20-10, 04:24 PM   #10
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By and large, it's rarely necessary to shift your gears in the way you describe. If you watch the terrain/traffic conditions you should be in the approriate gear where they do change.

If you need a really low gear to ride uphill, then you should be changing down in preparation before the road begins to rise. Ditto intersections whether signal controlled or not. Anticipation should reduce the need to shift in the way that you seem to find necessary. You might consider taking a tip from drivers who have to undergo advanced driver training: they are often required to commentate on the road/traffic ahead of them in a way which describes what they will need to do to meet those conditions. If you do this when you ride, you will soon start to spot the need to change gear ahead of time as a matter of course.
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Old 02-22-10, 06:31 AM   #11
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If you need a really low gear to ride uphill, then you should be changing down in preparation before the road begins to rise.
I downshift when my cadence begins to fall and continue to downshift as the hill steepens, keeping my cadence in the proper range. If you downshift too early you'll be spinning too high a cadence, which will probably cause you to coast uphill until your speed drops to a level appropriate for the gear you're in. That's inefficient. Shifting while climbing is no problem if you keep your cadence up.
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Old 02-22-10, 09:55 PM   #12
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For normal riding use the middle ring at the front doing all the shifting at the back with your right hand. Use the little ring at the front for steep hills. Shifting down from the middle to the small ring is like shifting down 3 gears at the back, so you may want to shift up a gear at the back at the same time to keep your pedalling pace.
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