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Old 03-09-10, 06:40 PM   #1
Pockymonster
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Clipless pedal stopping help

Okay guys help me figure this out. What is the proper stopping technique when using clipless pedals? I've fallen twice already. This is what I've tried so far that hasn't worked too well.

1. Apply brake. Stand up slightly. Unclip both simultaneously. Plant both feet on ground, one on each side of bike with bike between my legs. I used to do this on platform pedals and it worked great. With clipless when I stand up they clip back in or i can't clip out fast enough if I stand a bit.

2. Apply brake. Clip out one foot. Stand slightly. Lean on side with foot out and put that foot down and leave other foot clipped in.

Both result in crashing. I'm thinking what I should do is #2 but leave out the stand slightly part as when I do that it puts weight on the clipped in side and I go falling over. So stay sitting and stick one leg out and stop on it? Is this the only reliable way or do I have my setup wrong.

Also I noticed when my foot is at the very bottom of the stroke it's hard to clip out because the crank is in the way of my heel. It felt kind of wrong anyway so I moved the cleat on the shoe forward and it's a bit better.

Any tips? I already re-opened the wound on my knee from the other day.
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Old 03-09-10, 07:01 PM   #2
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do #2

if balance is a concern. then unclip the 2nd foot once you come to a complete stop.

i usually unclip one side just as I am about to come to a stop, then support myself with one leg, stay clipped in on the other side. If I am especially fatigued, I will unclip the 2nd once I reach a complete stop.
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Old 03-09-10, 07:04 PM   #3
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I guess I just have to unlearn how I used to stop. I'm still wondering that if in an emergency I'll be able to clip out if i stop quickly. If not I guess I'll just have to crash. I've got the tension on the lowest so they come out pretty easily and when I crashed it popped out on it's own. I guess that's good to know. I don't suppose increasing the tension would make it harder to accidentally pop back in right?

I guess I'm gonna just stick with unclipping one side then leaning and stopping on that foot.

Any ideas for emergency stops though? I've had a few emergency stops before where i'd be straddling the top tube and the bike almost go flying between my legs as I put my feet down and hold onto it.
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Old 03-09-10, 07:49 PM   #4
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Unclip one foot only, either before or as you brake. Stay on the saddle and just lean to the unclipped side and put you foot on the ground.

Practice. Lean against a wall, clip in and out with you ground foot several times and then practice unclipping and leaning to that side.
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Old 03-09-10, 08:48 PM   #5
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if im stopping at a stop sign or something like that, i'll unclip one foot and lean. it takes a bit of getting used to but its not too bad. just think yourself through it and don't panic. if i'm coming to my destination, I'll wait till I get within like 30 feet or so and initiate a slow stop and unclip both feet. that way the inertia of the bike moving forward brings me off the saddle and onto the top tube where I just straddle with no problem, step off the bike and either lock it or bring it inside. if you can pull that off it will be easiest for you i think.
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Old 03-09-10, 08:55 PM   #6
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Unclip as you first apply the brake, put that foot down as you come to a stop. Rotate your clipped-in foot around to where you can push down to get momentum immediately. When you start again, push off lightly with the foot on the ground as you start to pedal with the other. This is, BTW, easier to do while standing, rather than on the saddle.

Just a little practice will make it almost 2nd nature.
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Old 03-09-10, 10:51 PM   #7
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If it's likely to be only a short stop (<15 sec.) I'll just track-stand it, otherwise unclip one foot. I seldom find it necessary to unclip both feet.
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Old 03-09-10, 11:00 PM   #8
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Maybe I should practice 2-3 second track stand then clip off jump down and saddle the bike. Should practice on grass this time though...
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Old 03-09-10, 11:12 PM   #9
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rotate your heel away from the bike so you don't clip the crank, wheel or anything else.
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Old 03-10-10, 02:08 AM   #10
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I have never unclipped both feet whiile the bike was actually moving (i.e.. braking to a stop.) How would that even work? At a light or whatever I unclip only my right foot and lean slightly that direction. Either foot would work I'm sure. I like the right foot because I'm right-handed/footed, so I have an easier time manipulating the pedal to get clipped in when I'm pushing off with my left foot.
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Old 03-10-10, 06:28 AM   #11
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Unclip before you stop.

I could go on, but it's really that simple.
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Old 03-10-10, 11:33 AM   #12
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When I unclip it clips back in! haha. I'll just have to get used to it and not clip back in.
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Old 03-10-10, 12:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pockymonster View Post
1. Apply brake. Stand up slightly. Unclip both simultaneously. Plant both feet on ground, one on each side of bike with bike between my legs. I used to do this on platform pedals and it worked great. With clipless when I stand up they clip back in or i can't clip out fast enough if I stand a bit.
It seems that you do this while sitting on the seat. If you can put your feet down while sitting, your seat is too low.

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2. Apply brake. Clip out one foot. Stand slightly. Lean on side with foot out and put that foot down and leave other foot clipped in.
Again, it seems you are sitting on the seat. Don't do this.

http://sheldonbrown.com/starting.html

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Both result in crashing. I'm thinking what I should do is #2 but leave out the stand slightly part as when I do that it puts weight on the clipped in side and I go falling over. So stay sitting and stick one leg out and stop on it? Is this the only reliable way or do I have my setup wrong.

Also I noticed when my foot is at the very bottom of the stroke it's hard to clip out because the crank is in the way of my heel. It felt kind of wrong anyway so I moved the cleat on the shoe forward and it's a bit better.
Unclip one foot.

1) Move one foot so that that foot's pedal is at the bottom.
2) Unclip the other foot that is at the top.
3) Standup on the clipped-in foot so you are off of the seat.
4) Put the unclipped foot on the ground.
5) Unclip the other foot and put it on the ground (this step is only needed it you are getting off of the bike).

The clips aren't your problem. Your problem with clips is revealing that your basic technique of getting off of the bike is poor.

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I guess I just have to unlearn how I used to stop.
Yes, you are doing it wrong.

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I'm still wondering that if in an emergency I'll be able to clip out if i stop quickly. If not I guess I'll just have to crash. I've got the tension on the lowest so they come out pretty easily and when I crashed it popped out on it's own. I guess that's good to know. I don't suppose increasing the tension would make it harder to accidentally pop back in right?
After some experience, you'll learn to unclip without thinking about it. That is, if you actually have enough time to react in an "emergency", you'll have enough time to clip-out.

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Any ideas for emergency stops though? I've had a few emergency stops before where i'd be straddling the top tube and the bike almost go flying between my legs as I put my feet down and hold onto it.
What the heck are you doing that requires many "emergency stops"??

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When I unclip it clips back in! haha. I'll just have to get used to it and not clip back in.
This is probably happening because you don't remove your foot from the pedal. You may also be rotating your heel back, square to the pedal. Basically, if your foot is on the pedal, that foot is going to be clipped-in.

Last edited by njkayaker; 03-10-10 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 03-10-10, 01:00 PM   #14
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You may also consider lowering the spring tension to make un-clipping easier.

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Old 03-10-10, 01:03 PM   #15
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1. Apply Brakes
2. Holding front brake firmly, do a stoppie (front wheelie)
3. Unclip left shoe
4. Get right foot in position for takeoff

This is what I do...well minus step number 2.
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Old 03-10-10, 01:47 PM   #16
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You need more practice---If unclipping is still a problem---Practice falling---Or landing might be more appropriate.

Stay seated in the saddle, unclip well before you need to and pull that foot away from the pedal. As you come to a stop- slide forward off the saddle and put the unclipped foot down on the ground. Won't take long before you get used to the Co-ordination to get it right but watch out. Fatal thing to do is unclip left and lean right. That hurts.
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Old 03-10-10, 04:16 PM   #17
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When I unclip it clips back in! haha. I'll just have to get used to it and not clip back in.
You're coasting to a stop, right? Just put the unclipped foot's heel on the pedal.
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Old 03-10-10, 06:55 PM   #18
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What the OP needs to do is put the platform pedals BACK on the bike and practice how to come to a stop properly with those.

If you feel you need to stand up from the saddle rather than slide forward from it when coming to a stop, or you simply place your feet on the ground while sitting on the saddle, you have it set WAY too low.

When coming to a stop, slide forward from the saddle with your weight on the foot that will remain on the pedal, balancing the bike to the opposite side.

Then when crawling towards the stop, rather than keep your foot on the pedal until the last possible moment, take your foot off of the pedal and hover your foot over the ground.

When you learn to stop like that then clipless will be a cinch.

Oh, and with clipless always unclip at the TOP of the pedal stroke when you can, at least when you're still learning. It's a lot easier. The position of the cleat has nothing to do with where you unclip, and everything to do with the position of the ball of your foot over the pedal during the pedal stroke.
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Old 03-10-10, 07:00 PM   #19
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What the OP needs to do is put the platform pedals BACK on the bike and practice how to come to a stop properly with those.
Yup.

Ya know, over in the Road Cycling forum, there are people asking about increasing average speed, climbing better, etc, and they're reminded that "it's the engine" that needs the most improvement.

In this case, "it's the engine" again, not the OP's bike setup.
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Old 03-10-10, 07:44 PM   #20
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In this case, "it's the engine" again, not the OP's bike setup.
Sounds like the problem is in the ECU.
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Old 03-11-10, 10:17 AM   #21
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Wow you guys are making a lot of assumptions.

1. No my feet cannot touch the ground when I'm on the saddle.
2. Previously on platforms when I'd stop I'd grab the front brake and basically slide forward out of the saddle and plop both feet down under the crank on their respective sides.
3. About emergency stops: Hrm.. I dunno here are a list of possibilities : idiots in traffic, dogs running around not on a leash, people opening car doors without looking first, the whole family out walking hand in hand on a MUP as you turn a corner, some asshat elitist roadie trying to pass you thinking he's faster, pot holes, unforeseen road hazards. Which most of them can be avoided by being careful but sometimes stuff just happens no? Also I'm primarily not a road rider so on some trails things can get a bit hairy?

Man this forum seems to be full of elitists that come to quick conclusions and have a holier than thou attitude. You all almost sound like teenage boys on XBOX LIVE screaming "nooooob" at somebody for asking a question.

My problem as I've stated before is my usual stopping technique which I outlined didn't work because as I slid forward off the saddle getting ready to plant my feet on the ground as the bike came to a stop the cleats would snap BACK IN to the pedals. There is no issue with the height of my saddle or "the engine". Should I apologize that I described "sliding forward out of the saddle" as "standing up" our should I draw you all a diagram? How else would you describe your rear end being out of the saddle be it with your knees still bent or legs fully extended? Slide yourself out of the saddle with both feet still on the pedals, you don't call that standing?

The reason I was considering leaving myself 'seated' during the stop was because they would clip back in and if I only clipped one foot out the other goes right to the bottom of the stroke and causes the bike to lean that way.

No wonder so many people hate us cyclists. Half of us are elitist ****** bags.
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Old 03-11-10, 10:28 AM   #22
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To illustrate what I'm talking about, this is how I would normally stop (see first few seconds of video) except I'd basically hop off in front with both feet down at the same time. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pexggcTo3Xs
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Old 03-11-10, 10:38 AM   #23
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NOOOOOOB

Just practice. Learn to stand. You can also use signs and utility poles to hold onto instead of putting a foot down.
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Old 03-11-10, 10:49 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pockymonster View Post
Wow you guys are making a lot of assumptions.

1. No my feet cannot touch the ground when I'm on the saddle.
2. Previously on platforms when I'd stop I'd grab the front brake and basically slide forward out of the saddle and plop both feet down under the crank on their respective sides.
3. About emergency stops: Hrm.. I dunno here are a list of possibilities : idiots in traffic, dogs running around not on a leash, people opening car doors without looking first, the whole family out walking hand in hand on a MUP as you turn a corner, some asshat elitist roadie trying to pass you thinking he's faster, pot holes, unforeseen road hazards. Which most of them can be avoided by being careful but sometimes stuff just happens no? Also I'm primarily not a road rider so on some trails things can get a bit hairy?

Man this forum seems to be full of elitists that come to quick conclusions and have a holier than thou attitude. You all almost sound like teenage boys on XBOX LIVE screaming "nooooob" at somebody for asking a question.

My problem as I've stated before is my usual stopping technique which I outlined didn't work because as I slid forward off the saddle getting ready to plant my feet on the ground as the bike came to a stop the cleats would snap BACK IN to the pedals. There is no issue with the height of my saddle or "the engine". Should I apologize that I described "sliding forward out of the saddle" as "standing up" our should I draw you all a diagram? How else would you describe your rear end being out of the saddle be it with your knees still bent or legs fully extended? Slide yourself out of the saddle with both feet still on the pedals, you don't call that standing?

The reason I was considering leaving myself 'seated' during the stop was because they would clip back in and if I only clipped one foot out the other goes right to the bottom of the stroke and causes the bike to lean that way.

No wonder so many people hate us cyclists. Half of us are elitist ****** bags.
This is the best post I've ever read here on BF. Awesome response OP.

What I've learned over the years may or may not help you but I'll describe what I do and I haven't fallen since the first couple of times after I got my pedals.

As I'm slowing, I unclip my left foot. I use to unclip my right one but I got into the habit of trying to put my foot on the curb. Well, I missed it a couple of times and that just wasn't pretty. I'm sure it was good for a laugh or two though. As I'm about to stop completely, I'm still seated but slide off my saddle onto my left foot. I don't try and stand because bike shoes and clipless pedals don't mix well when not clipped in. Kinda like ice skatting with the covers on the blades. Now, I have had the issue you describe where you pedal clips back in and sometimes I'm unaware that it did that and almost caused me to fall on my face. What I do now is simply hold my foot off the pedal. It's only a second or two so it's not a big deal.

I can't help you on the emergency stop issue and I've thankfully never had to put it into practice. In that situation, I think falling over at 1 mph would be the least of my worries.

Hope this helps. I'm no expert by any means, but this is what has worked for me so far.

Couldn't agree more with your elitist remark about most cyclist. It's just riding bikes... We shouldn't take ourselves so seriously.
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Old 03-11-10, 10:52 AM   #25
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The video shows you the correct way to do it. One foot down. The only difference is you need to twist your heal away from the bike to unclip just before you put your one foot down. With practice it becomes natural to twist your foot as you dismount. Your problem is that you insist on using both feet. That wont work very well with clipless.
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