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  1. #1
    Senior Member CNY James's Avatar
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    saddle forward or saddle backward?

    ive put a few rides in with my "new" built bike, fine tuning the fit. I've noticed I find myself scooting back on the saddle. should I move it forward or backward to correct the fit issue? i feel like i can make sense of both adjustments. I know I can use trial and error but I'd rather just do it and be done.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Senior Member BlazingPedals's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'd consider tilting the nose up just a bit. That way you're less likely to slide down onto the nose. The fore/aft adjustment is to get the knee over the pedal.

  3. #3
    Senior Member CNY James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
    If it were me, I'd consider tilting the nose up just a bit. That way you're less likely to slide down onto the nose. The fore/aft adjustment is to get the knee over the pedal.
    its already slightly elevated...

  4. #4
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    Decide whether you're scooting back to fit the rest of your body or scooting back to find a comfortable spot for your butt.

  5. #5
    Elmira>Taiwan>Elmira flatlander_48's Avatar
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    Well, backward would require a 180 deg rotation of your hips. Sounds a touch painful...
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
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  6. #6
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    The saddle for-aft position should be in relation to the pedal. You can measure that distance horizontally along the top tube.
    Bikes can vary in their crank length and seat-tube angle which adds variation to the for-aft distance. Seatposts also vary in layback, the clamp position in relation to the post axis.
    By measuring the saddle to pedal distance directly, you eliminate all these issues.
    In the olden days, custom builders used to adjust the seat-tube angle for each customer. Some builders still do this. Most people can get stock frames to fit by selection of suitable layback in the post.

    Some time trial bikes have reversable posts so you move the saddle through a wide range horizontally for different events.
    Look used to make a seatpost with extra horizontal movement for use as a fitting tool.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Nermal's Avatar
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    Assuming the tilt is right, move it forwards. Your butt knows where it wants to be, so make the saddle conform to your body. Always make the bike fit your body. Don't try to make your body fit the bike.
    Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Nermal's Avatar
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    Oh, yeah. I didn't notice the post from BarracksSi. That's another consideration.
    Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.

  9. #9
    Senior Member CNY James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nermal View Post
    Assuming the tilt is right, move it forwards. Your butt knows where it wants to be, so make the saddle conform to your body. Always make the bike fit your body. Don't try to make your body fit the bike.
    this makes sense. I will give it a try.

    Hoping to get a ride in tomorrow after work. my luck wasnt so great last night or tonight I'll post back with my results

  10. #10
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CNY James View Post
    this makes sense. I will give it a try.

    Hoping to get a ride in tomorrow after work. my luck wasnt so great last night or tonight I'll post back with my results
    Just thought of this, prompted by the "my hands go numb" thread (I think it was over in Road Cycling, if not here) --

    If you slide it forward a bit, see if you end up with more weight on your hands.

    It's possible that your lower body actually works better towards the rear of the saddle as it was positioned when you started this thread, and you could stand to have the bars a bit closer to you.

    Just a thought...

  11. #11
    Senior Member CNY James's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarracksSi View Post
    Just thought of this, prompted by the "my hands go numb" thread (I think it was over in Road Cycling, if not here) --

    If you slide it forward a bit, see if you end up with more weight on your hands.

    It's possible that your lower body actually works better towards the rear of the saddle as it was positioned when you started this thread, and you could stand to have the bars a bit closer to you.

    Just a thought...
    that thread wasnt mine, i've never posted in the road forum.

    I moved the seat forward slightly and todays ride was far more comfortable than the previous 3. I'll stick with it for now... gonna have to readjust when I buy my new saddle & post. (sigh)

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