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  1. #1
    Senior Member mwchandler21's Avatar
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    Upgrading the ol' Trek 1000.

    I have a 2003 Trek 1000, only about 3000 miles on it. I took several years off from riding it but have put close to 2000 of the miles on it since June. I've started to notice a lot of the cheaper components and have been bit by the new bike bug. However i really do like my bike and wouldn't be opposed to just upgrading it. My question(s) is what order should I upgrade in if I did and what would be a realistic price tag of the upgrades, stipulating that most of the work would be done by my LBS.

    Current setup on the bike is stock minus seat and pedals (SORA components and 32 spoke Alex Rims(not sure of model))

    Wish list:
    Better built wheels, clyde & rough road worthy, with hubs compatible for later upgrade to 9 or 10 speed.
    better shifters, can be shifted from the drops unlike SORA
    Shimano 105 or better rear deraileur
    9 or 10 speed cassette
    replace cables
    double crank
    Shimano 105 or better front deraileur

    Thanks

  2. #2
    tsl
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    I have a 2000 Trek 1000. There are three things I upgraded that made a huge difference in the bike

    Wheels. I worked with a wheelbuilder who took the time to understand my needs, preferences and riding style, and who then hand-built a set of wheels tailored to that. They were transformative. It was like a whole 'nother bike after that. (FWIW, all contemporary Shimano compatible hubs accommodate 8, 9, and 10-speed.)

    Fork. Mine was old enough that it had a steel fork. Upgrading to carbon was also transformative. You'll have an easier time finding an appropriate fork since yours is an inch-and-an-eighth. Mine is the older one-inch. Took some searching to find a carbon fork in 1" and the correct geometry.

    Shifters. I learned that the problem with Sora isn't in the FD or RD, it's in the shifters. Get yourself a set of Shimano's R-500 levers. They are Ultegra-level in quality. By comparison, I also have a 105 bike and a Dura-Ace bike. With the R-500s, the Sora on the 1000 is indistinguishable from the 105, and shifts almost as well as my Dura-Ace bike. (In fact, it may only be placebo-effect that makes me think the Dura-Ace shifts better--they're that close.) R-500s are available here, and possibly elsewhere too.

    Seven-year-old cables and housings should be replaced, just as a matter of course. (If you're going to replace the levers, remember they come with new cables and housing, so you may want to skip cables for now.) I wouldn't replace anything else in the drivetrain. Wait until you replace the whole bike. Bear in mind too, that while 8-speed doesn't have the bling of 10, chains and cassettes are a whole lot cheaper--like about a third of the price. There's beauty in that too.
    Last edited by tsl; 04-12-10 at 06:08 PM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


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  3. #3
    Senior Member mwchandler21's Avatar
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    Thank you that is what I wanted to know.

  4. #4
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    I agree that replacing derailleurs is often a waste of money.

    If I were you I would replace the shifters with whatever proper STI (dual lever, not lever and little tab), and a new chain and cassette, and cables.

    I would have my original 32 spoke wheels trued and retensioned. THe 8 speed hub that came with the 1000 is compatible with 9 or 10 speed with no modifications. If properly overhauled, greased, and adjusted it will be smooth and reliable.
    If I did not like my triple crankset I would refrain from shifting into the small chainring or block it out using the derailleur end point screws, and adjust the shifter to work with this. No need to spend any money.

    For any other changes I would wait until something broke or wore out.

  5. #5
    Gouge Away kaliayev's Avatar
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    I recently rebuilt my 92 Trek 1200. Only stock parts used was the headset, 105 brakes, and the Campy seatpost clamp. Rides much better now! Also dropped the weight by a couple of pounds.

  6. #6
    Junior Member cowchip500's Avatar
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    TSL - I'm not doubting your knowledge, but I'm not seeing how wheels can make that much difference. Same for the fork. I, too, am riding a T1k. I live around lots of hills & you can bet I'll be changing my shifters right away. Thanx for the great advice.
    Last edited by cowchip500; 04-12-10 at 11:46 PM. Reason: spellinig

  7. #7
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowchip500 View Post
    I'm not seeing how wheels can make that much difference. Same for the fork.
    Wheels made a difference in ride and handling, and acceleration and climbing. The stock wheels on my bike were very heavy, and shook over bumps. The new wheels are much, much, lighter. They're about a light as you can make them and still have 32 spokes and enough ruggedness for daily commuting.

    This made a huge impact in acceleration and climbing. It's easier to spin up the wheel now--after all, the bike doesn't move until you spin the wheel. Folks who haven't experienced lightweight wheels have a really hard time believing that weight makes a difference. I know I couldn't, but I went on faith. Glad I did.

    The new wheels also ride and handle a lot better. They feel tight and responsive. They also don't resonate over bumps. With the old ones, bumps shook the whole wheel. I could watch the top of the rim jiggle side to side when I hit bumps. The new ones just roll over them. As for handling, the new wheels are stiff laterally, so there's no swaying when I lay it over into a corner. It tracks where I intend, not wherever it wants.

    My 2000 Trek 1000 came with a Cro-Moly fork. Steel is supposed to be real, right? Good for the ride and whatnot. The bike rode like a buckboard. Even after the new, better-riding wheels, about 40 miles was my comfortable limit, and at 60 miles I wanted nothing more than to get off the bike, and stay off for it a day or two. Since the fork was steel, I attributed all the ride issues to the aluminum frame.

    We tangled with a Pontiac last spring. Bent the fork, driver's insurance paid for the repairs. I chipped-in a couple hundred to make up the difference between a new steel fork and a carbon one. The bike rides so much better now that it's like I got a whole new bike. A couple of weeks after getting it back, we did back-to-back 75-mile rides. I got off the bike feeling just as good as when I got on. The bike no longer beats me up.

    If your 1000 is new enough to have a carbon fork (2004 or 05 and newer I think), then don't worry about it. If it's older and has an aluminum fork like the OP's or steel like mine did, it's well worth the expense--if you want to keep the bike anyway. I will never have anything but a carbon fork on any bike from now on.

    I bought a steel bike in February--used--just to see what the "steel is real" fuss is about. I would not have bought it with a steel fork though. Been there, done that, it sucked. That said, it's a top line frame and rides nice. Different than my other bikes, too early to say if it's better, or just different.
    Last edited by tsl; 04-13-10 at 09:21 AM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  8. #8
    Gouge Away kaliayev's Avatar
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    I agree with tsl's assessment of lighter wheels and carbon fork. Mine are nothing special, a set of Forte Titans I got real cheap for my main road bike until I got a set of Souls. They are lighter and stronger than the stock 7 speed Matrix rims. Picked up the carbon fork, a Trek Icon OCLV, at my LBS. Noticed it piled behind a bunch of forks, asked about it and they gave me a super deal on it. Much lighter and forgiving that the stock CR-MO fork. Combined with the better gearing of the DA 7700 crankset and the bike rides so much better!

  9. #9
    Soma Lover
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    The difference between my Trek 1000 with the OEM Vuelta Airlines and Mavic Cosmos was night and day. They dropped a full pound from the bike and between them and the more supple tires, it felt like three pounds.

    After that I started looking around and calculating price-performance ratios. If the bike had fit me better, I would've sprung for the carbon fork and then started looking around for what else was reasonable to do. It's not that steel forks necessarily ride harsh, my Soma rides like butta, but that particular OEM fork sure did. A good carbon fork would have also shed another full pound of weight.

    In the end though, with the bike being a 54 and with 52's fitting me better, I put the OEM wheels back on it, sold it for $70 less than I paid for it, and bought new instead of upgrading.

  10. #10
    Alfredo Contador |3iker's Avatar
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    Hey TSL, why the R500 instead of a Tiagra? The latter has gear indicators. Works great for noobs like me that do not want to look down and back to determine gearing.

  11. #11
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by |3iker View Post
    Hey TSL, why the R500 instead of a Tiagra? The latter has gear indicators. Works great for noobs like me that do not want to look down and back to determine gearing.
    Tiagra is 9-speed, and the OP's (and mine) bike is eight.

    Plus, from that same vendor, the Ultegra-level R-500s are only $10 more.

    As for indicators, I let my legs tell me if the gear is right. No need for indicators.
    Last edited by tsl; 04-13-10 at 06:10 PM.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  12. #12
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by cachehiker View Post
    my Trek 1000 with the OEM Vuelta Airlines
    Yours must be similar vintage as mine. Those are the wheels I took off.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  13. #13
    Soma Lover
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    In the end, the Vuelta Airlines seemed like rims that were designed to look high end, actual performance be damned.

    We weighed that wheelset in the shop, about 1000g for the front and 1200g for the rear with an awful lot of it concentrated in the not particularly strong or aero but still very heavy at 550g apiece rims. I also swapped out the 350g Conti 1000's that I was getting way too many flats with for 250g Michelin Carbons.

    I still wish that bike was a 52 and I'm still hoping to stumble across a frame to build up a fast commuter with. It looked so cool with the Blue Cosmos and yellow striped Carbons and it had rack bosses to boot.

  14. #14
    Pat
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    I was thinking of suggesting that instead of upgrading an old bike, that you just buy a new one with the kind of component mix you want. But I saw TSL's post. He is quite knowledgeable. I would think that you will do fine following his recommendations.

  15. #15
    Senior Member filtersweep's Avatar
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    You want the LBS to do the labor? I would suggest your bike is not worth upgrading, regardless how much you like it. Granted, wheels are an investment that can be carried forward to your next bike, but upgraded wheels will cost more than your bike's present value. Paying your shop to upgrade the fork? Between the cost of the wheels and the fork, and what you might get from selling the bike, you are already in a different league if you look at buying a used bike--- or find a great deal (like last year's model) on a new bike. Your LBS will want MSRP plus labor for everything....

    ...now, if you were scrounging ebay and were able to supply your own labor, it might be a different story.

    On the other hand, riding a 105-level bike with a carbon fork, and some decent wheels (even if they are OEM) will definitely be a noticeable and worthwhile difference. You will be hitting the sweet spot of value for money.

  16. #16
    Soma Lover
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    Quote Originally Posted by filtersweep View Post
    Your LBS will want MSRP plus labor for everything....
    Three of the five shops here in town are always willing to help a guy out, especially if a low end bike is his/her only transportation. This is often how they get their noob mechanics up to speed: older, lower end, and less temperamental bikes. One of them even specializes in recycling bicycles. They're a little hole in the wall with the lowest overhead and lots of used frames, cranks, shifters, forks, wheels, etc. stacked in every corner. My main LBS even donates labor to keep a couple of handicapped adults bike running on a parts cost only basis.

    I like TSL's advice minus just one thing. mwchandler21 should be careful about going overboard on the fork. It's too easy to spend big bucks on an Ouzo Pro when a nearly new take off is much more appropriate.

  17. #17
    tsl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat View Post
    I was thinking of suggesting that instead of upgrading an old bike, that you just buy a new one with the kind of component mix you want. But I saw TSL's post. He is quite knowledgeable. I would think that you will do fine following his recommendations.
    Thanks for the vote of confidence, but just because it was right for me and I've done it, doesn't necessarily make it right for anyone else on the planet.

    I've actually been waiting for a "lipstick on a pig" post. Yours comes closest.

    I didn't do everything all at once. My upgrades have been done over a period of years. A couple hundred here, a few hundred there. And opportunity knocked--in the form of a Pontiac--so most of the fork was paid by the insurance of the driver who hit me.

    What made it the right thing to do for me is:

    • I like the bike a lot on a fundamental level--it's frisky as a puppy. All it wants to do is run and play.
    • I have no intentions of selling it for a good long time, so resale value isn't an issue.
    • I bought the bike specifically because it needed work (also because it fit and was cheap), so that I had something to use while I learned how to work on my own bikes--Tuition in the School of Hard Knocks.
    • I wanted to find out for myself if the "lighter wheels are better" is true or not, and was willing to spend money to find out. (Besides, wheels can be moved to other bikes or sold separately.) More tuition in the School of Hard Knocks.
    • I wanted to find out if there was a difference between the Bontrager knock-off of the Wound Up fork that came on my Portland, and a genuine Wound Up fork, again, tuition in the School of Hard Knocks.


    So you see, even though I've put upgrades worth over twice the original selling price of my 1000, most of it was actually tuition in the School of Hard Knocks, and part of it was paid by Liberty Mutual.

    Still, on a fundamental level, I really like the bike and there's a role for it in my collection of bikes. (It's currently my fair-weather commuter, intended to keep some miles off my primary commuter.)
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

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