Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Newbie Arcmerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Noobie Cyclist Alert - (I could use some help

    Hi, I recently purchased my first road cycle (Murray Sebring) and I basically could use a hand with all aspects of it. I bought it secondhand and I'd like to go through and do a thorough inspection/cleaning of all the parts (or at least the easier ones). I could use some advice or idiot-proof instructions.

    Here's a few pictures of bike-

    http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j1...G/P1010214.jpg
    http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j1...G/P1010213.jpg
    http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j1...G/P1010212.jpg
    http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j1...G/P1010211.jpg

    Thanks so much for your help! If you have *very* cheap parts that you could recommend I'd greatly appreciate it. I don't exactly know how good of a bike this is, but I bought it anticipating I'd learn how to fix up a bike in the process.

    The only thing I know I'm doing for sure is taping the handlebar. Can anyone recommend a good tape?

    Thanks once again, and if you have any questions for me I'll try to answer them as quickly and as in depth as possible.

  2. #2
    Senior Member gurry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    niagara region
    My Bikes
    1987 bianchi campione d'italia, 1970's eatons glider, 1990's hybrid, 1992 trek antelope
    Posts
    357
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Check the hubs to see if they are loose or too tight. Pick up the front of the bike and see if you can wiggle the front wheel side to side. If you get a little play, then the cones are loose. If there is no play, then try removing the wheel from the bike and see if the axle spins freely. If it spins good, then all is good with the front wheel. If it is tight, or you can hear the dry bearings, then you will need to adjust\lube the front axle. This procedure may require 13mm cone wrench for the front, 15mm cone wrench for the back, as well as 15\17mm wrenches. Repeat for the rear wheel.
    Next, remove the seat\seatpost from the bike carefully with your wheels installed. Then tip it over to see if anything falls out of the frame. Grease the post before reinstalling it.
    Next, try to get the bike upside down and see if you can dribble some light oil into the cable housings where exposed. This helps free up the cables for more responsiveness.
    There are excellent articles on fixing bikes online like Sheldon Brown, Park Tool, and others.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    11,962
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    looks like a nice old bike. it wouldn't be dumb to bring it to your local bike shop and pay them for a ride ready tune-up. it looks like an old used bike, but clean and in great shape.

    after you know it is all functioning and safe then ride ride ride ... :-)

    as fa as additional accessories I've always enjoyed a simple cheap rear rack and a coup[le years ago discovered the joy of an actually rear rack trunk bag (both could be found for $20 each)

    here's a picture of an old 10-speed with a rear rack trunk bag. I don't go anywhere without it

    oh don't forget stuff to fix a flat tire like spare tube; patch kit; tools to remove the wheels and tire, and pump
    Attached Images Attached Images
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Montreal
    My Bikes
    Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
    Posts
    6,521
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tilt the bars up so the top is more or less flat and the drops point down to the rear hub, like rumrunn6's. It will then be more comfortable to ride withyour hands on the top of the brakes.

  5. #5
    Newbie Arcmerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks a lot for the advice. Feel free to keep it coming!

    Another question: Should I invest in a set of brake hoods? How useful are they and what exactly do they do?

    Also, if you know of any videos I could watch to help me through this I'd be much obliged!
    Last edited by Arcmerx; 07-23-10 at 01:30 PM.

  6. #6
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    My Bikes
    RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
    Posts
    11,433
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Brake hoods just give you a little bit of a cushion to make it more comfortable to rest your hands on top of the brakes. Better bang for the buck would be a bit of foam pipe insulation cut to size, secured with a bit of electrical tape.
    Save your money, ride this bike, learn how to maintain it, but avoid putting money into it. You'll need that money to buy the bike that the Murray will help you learn that you will really want.

    Go to the Park Tools website for lots of bike repair help.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  7. #7
    17yrold in 64yrold body
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    922
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like Cinelli cork bar tape. Lots of colors, and paterns to choose from.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kimmitt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, CA
    My Bikes
    Electra Townie 3i with xtracycle, Surly Cross-Check
    Posts
    952
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also, it's spelled "noob."
    I see unexamined people. All the time. I don't think they know they're unexamined.

  9. #9
    Senior Member coldfeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good advice so far, one thing, the rims look like stainless, or chrome steel. Don't expect the brakes to do much in the rain. While I also would advise not spending lots of cash on it, you might look into some brake pads designed to work with steel rims, the originals are probably pretty hard by now anyway.

  10. #10
    Senior Member gurry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    niagara region
    My Bikes
    1987 bianchi campione d'italia, 1970's eatons glider, 1990's hybrid, 1992 trek antelope
    Posts
    357
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 above. I will usually sand or file the old brake pads and clean the rims real good. Remember to slow down when it is raining! As for online video's, the bicycle tutor has an excellent website! Another resource can be your local library, as you can take out a book for a couple of weeks and while you are tuning the bike, you can have the book close at hand for reference.

  11. #11
    Newbie Arcmerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Really great stuff, everyone! Thanks again!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •