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  1. #1
    Absorbent Newcomer ScooTrikkeBike's Avatar
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    Good Dual/Full Suspension Bikes?

    I am pretty sure this is a contradiction for most experienced bikers, but I am looking for a decent bike with full suspension (mountain, hybrid, whatever) with a budget of $300. The frame should be able to fit me, and I'm 6'0" and 245 lbs.

    I know $300 is not a lot, but I hope it is enough for something. I don't do any serious racing, distance, or mountain biking, but I would need it for a 6-8 mile daily commute. I say full suspension (or at least seat suspension) because where I live the roads aren't very even and there are a lot of potholes.

    Anyways, I was looking into the Jeep Cherokee full Susp. Bike. Here are the specs:

    Frame: 7000 aluminum floating beam full suspension
    Fork- Steel Crown 80mm travel
    Rear Shock: Coil
    Headset: Steel Threadless 1 1/8"
    Stem: Alloy XR 26 31.8 clamp
    Handlebar: Alloy Riser MTB 31.8
    Grips: Velo Kraton D2
    Brakes: Promax 320 Mechanical Disk F & R
    Brake Levers: Forged Alloy
    Shifters: Shimano 24 Speed with Indicators
    Front Derailleur: Shimano Tourney
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano Altus
    Cassette: Shimano 8 Speed 12-28
    Chain: KMC
    Crankset: Alloy Arms 26, 38, 48 Alloy
    Bottom Bracket: Square Taper VP
    Pedals: VP Alloy Cage
    Wheels: Custom Alloy Disc Rims with 32 hole Stainless Steel Spokes
    Tires: Mountain Knobby Tread 26" x 2.1"
    Saddle: Vitesse Custom
    Seat Post: Vitesse
    Seat Clamp- Alloy Adjustable
    Weight: 33 lbs

    Could anyone tell me if this bike is any good, or if there are other full suspension bikes that are good out there for my budget, hopefully with at least full disk brakes, shimano gears, dual/full suspension, at least a 19" frame, and weighing less than 35 lbs.
    It's as easy as riding a bike...badly

  2. #2
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    It is next to impossible to find a good full suspension MTB for that price. Your best bet is to look at the used market.

    How about this? $450 new

    http://www.fujibikes.com/bike/details/crosstown_2_0
    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    Senior Member pablosnazzy's Avatar
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    the ONLY way you can find a full suspension bicycle that you can actually ride for $300 is if it is stolen and the person selling it need money for crack. i'm not trying to be a jerk, i am trying to help you. potholes in the road don't mean you need full suspension. paris roubaix is done without full suspension (not at all comfortable, but it *can* be done). chances are you don't need it. if you HAVE GOT TO have full suspension, you are starting at over $1000 for just the frame.


    "..... hopefully with at least full disk brakes, shimano gears, dual/full suspension, at least a 19" frame, and weighing less than 35 lbs."

    again, i'm not trying to be a jerk here, but that is completely unreasonable.

  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Commuting doesn't even need front suspension, unless the shortest route is a logging/fireroad thru the forest.
    even then probably not.


    Jeep Cherokee is a Chrysler made Automobile , they don't make bikes, I expect the brand is just paint on a nondescript bike.

    what you cannot tell by looking at a bike is the care with which it was assembled by the mechanic, and their skill.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 10-07-10 at 07:13 PM.

  5. #5
    Absorbent Newcomer ScooTrikkeBike's Avatar
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    Well, does anyone have any suggestions for evene a Front Suspension bike that is high quality?

    I found this bike on Craigslist today for $200, but don't know if it is any good:

    GREAT VALUE! on a Fresh Custom built Hardtail. Trail, dirt or even commuter.
    Bike appears almost new. (bike shows some very slight paint chips and rub) Lightweight, quality, 2007 heat treated seamless 7005 butted Access frame. 22in. frame is large to XL standover 32.5" Best for rider 6' and taller.

    Hydro-formed lightweight Access frame gets 4 S*T*A*R*S from DirtWorld

    "The Access XCL is the best yet - comparable to frames found in many expensive bikes from the "big guys". A long list of improvements puts this frame far above the original Access design that Mountain Bike Action described as a "classic NORBA race ready design" only a few years ago. Now using radically butted aluminum tubing that shaves a half pound from the weight, the XCL also features beautifully sculpted & forged dropouts, a lightweight externally machined head tube, reinforcing head tube gusset, and lighter, thinner seat tube that now accepts a standard (and more comfortable) 27.2mm seatpost. We think you'll agree that the XCL represents the absolute pinnacle in value, without sacrificing performance."

    and better from MtBR http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/frames...37_119crx.aspx

    High quality Shimano Deore components
    Brand New Kenda Cross Plus tires

    Shimano Deore XT mega 9 X 3 speed shift/brake
    Shimano XT Deore derailleurs front and rear
    Shimano BR-M420 brakes set
    Shimano HG 50 9 speed cassette 12-28
    Shimano Parallax hubs
    Ritchey headset, stem, bars
    HG 53 9 speed chain
    New Selle Royal Viper Saddle
    Bontrager Sport Seatpost
    All New Cables/Housings
    Bar extensions

    Wheels
    Excellent Tioga Factory 32 Rims using presta tubes

    Front Suspension Fork
    Near NEW 80mm RST Capa T6 with preload adjustment, working perfectly.
    disc brake tabs front and rear, complete braze-ons for fenders bottles or racks

    This bike seems decent since it comes with Shimano Deore shifters etc, but I haven't spent the time properly researching it yet.

    I just would like a bike that is versatile enough for me to do pretty much anything on, because I may get interested in Mountain Biking, or racing, or Road Biking, etc and don't want to have to buy a new bike.
    It's as easy as riding a bike...badly

  6. #6
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    A good shock absorber, like the Fox products, will run you close to 300.00. There is, as the guys note, no such thing as a cheap full-suspension bike. The device with the spring around it on the bike you show is not a shock absorber. It is a spring holder. There will be no damping whatever, so every time you hit a bump you will bounce...

    Why do you feel you need full suspension? Road bikes traditionally have none; riders simply take a bit of weight off the saddle when hitting bumps.
    A much cheaper way to go if you have a bad back or some other problem is the suspension seatpost. Much as with shock absorbers, the cheap ones just have a spring, good ones have a more complex linkage and elastomer elements.
    Either will take the edge off a bump.

  7. #7
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    There is no bike that exists that can do all of those things equally as well. The closest thing is a cyclocross bike but you won't find one for $300. It is like asking for a car that only costs $3,000 new that can haul a horse trailer, race on the weekends, and ride over sand dunes in the desert. It just plain doesn't exist.

    You are asking for a cross between these things AND for it to be very cheap. It is unreasonable.






    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    its a big box mass market bike , on craig's list ... Brand: not one from a bike shop.

    flip a coin ... Good cheap and durable, pick 1.


    but to do such diverse things you will need several tools.

    A hammer is not good for every thing, either..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 10-08-10 at 11:10 AM.

  9. #9
    Don from Austin Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablosnazzy View Post
    the ONLY way you can find a full suspension bicycle that you can actually ride for $300 is if it is stolen and the person selling it need money for crack. i'm not trying to be a jerk, i am trying to help you. potholes in the road don't mean you need full suspension. paris roubaix is done without full suspension (not at all comfortable, but it *can* be done). chances are you don't need it. if you HAVE GOT TO have full suspension, you are starting at over $1000 for just the frame.


    "..... hopefully with at least full disk brakes, shimano gears, dual/full suspension, at least a 19" frame, and weighing less than 35 lbs."

    again, i'm not trying to be a jerk here, but that is completely unreasonable.
    I don't believe a word of that. I bought a well-used Schwinn S25 at a pawnshop for $130 tax included. It was under $250 new. Front/rear suspension, full Shimano front and rear shifters and derailleurs, nothing shoddy that I can find. Yes it is not the lightest, but given my 175 pounds its excess weight is not an enormous factor. Its not the most sophisticated suspension there is, but its every bit as good as what's on a Trek I bought a few years ago. Its not the only bike I ride by any means, but I have put over 1000 trouble-free miles on it.

    The common statement that "All department store bikes are junk that won't go 50 miles" is elitist crap. While some are indeed atrocious, some can be perfectly serviceable and are equivalent to entry level LBS bikes. In fact, a Trek full suspension bike I bought several years ago at an elite LBS and have since sold to a friend and the Schwinn have almost identical components, weight and overall attributes.

    If you want to be able to handle potholes COMFORTABLY that is a perfectly reasonable choice and even a relatively crude rear suspension helps a great deal.

    So my Schwinn cost $125 and I have accrued over 1000 miles on it. If I was not "actually riding" it -- which the previous poster states is impossible -- how did it get the 1000+ miles on the odometer? If I had bought it new it would still have been under $300.

    Don in Austin

  10. #10
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    I am glad DOn In Austin enjoys his full suspension bike.

    However, I have to agree with everyone else... don't get a full suspension bike for commuting. The bikes are heavier, weaker, require more maintenance, have cheaper components than a similar priced rigid bike, and are less efficient to pedal.. in short less fun to ride.

    Get a rigid MTB or hybrid, and if you think the roads are too rough put on fatter tires and run a little less pressure.

    And the problem with buying a box-store bike is not that the bikes are terrible quality (most bike shops sell a few models of bikes similar to the higher-end of what is found in the box stores), but that they have no knowledge of proper bike setup, no knowledge of proper bike maintenance, and no selection of sizes... at 6' almost every bike sold in XMart is going to fit you like a tricycle fits a bear in the circus.

    Take your $300 and go to a bike shop, see what they have in your price range, and see if they havce anything used. Simplicity costs less and will save you headaches in the long run.

    Good luck with whatever you decide!

  11. #11
    Don from Austin Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    I am glad DOn In Austin enjoys his full suspension bike.

    However, I have to agree with everyone else... don't get a full suspension bike for commuting. The bikes are heavier, weaker, require more maintenance, have cheaper components than a similar priced rigid bike, and are less efficient to pedal.. in short less fun to ride.

    Get a rigid MTB or hybrid, and if you think the roads are too rough put on fatter tires and run a little less pressure.

    And the problem with buying a box-store bike is not that the bikes are terrible quality (most bike shops sell a few models of bikes similar to the higher-end of what is found in the box stores), but that they have no knowledge of proper bike setup, no knowledge of proper bike maintenance, and no selection of sizes... at 6' almost every bike sold in XMart is going to fit you like a tricycle fits a bear in the circus.

    Take your $300 and go to a bike shop, see what they have in your price range, and see if they havce anything used. Simplicity costs less and will save you headaches in the long run.

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
    I do enjoy my budget full suspension bike. Its not because of never having anything to compare it to. I used to own a Cannondale V800 -- sold it to a riding partner as it fit him better than me. I own two CF bikes I built myself. one is a front suspension MTB,, the other a flat-bar road bike. I own a Dawes full road bike. I own a Giant front suspension MTB. Support and advice from where the bike is purchased is not an issue with me as I do all repairs, upgrades and mods myself. I am hardly saying everyone should ride full suspension, just that cheap from a big box store does NOT necessarily mean unreliable or unrideable.

    There is always be a tradeoff between rough road comfort and curb-hopping ability vs. speed. Fat soft tires slow you down immensely. When I took those of the Schwinn, it was like releasing brakes. IMHO the soft fat tires were far more of a drag than what the suspension is. What would I know, except riding the same circuits on many different bikes and comparing average MPH?

    To each their own. I try not to put down anything that fits someone's needs.

    Don in Austin

  12. #12
    Absorbent Newcomer ScooTrikkeBike's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the feedback...

    Hey all,

    I just wanted to thank you for your excellent feedback.

    I guess the reason I am looking mostly for full suspension is just because that is what I am used to. But, ANYTHING is better than my bike for $300. Right now, I ride a Mongoose DXR-AL with 24" x 1.75" tires and a 12" or 13" frame. Given my size (and I'm not fat, mostly muscle) and stature, it looks really silly for me to ride and has terrible components. The main problem is, I avoid stopping at all costs because the brakes suck and once I've stopped it's almost impossible to start again. I put so much torque into starting the bike that it shifts down 5 gears and I have to run and jump on it, which is a bad idea considering it has a weight limit of about 125 pounds and I weigh a little under $250.

    So, in general, I am used to a full suspension bike, but really ANYTHING is better than that bike which I payed $75 for when I was 12 (already too heavy for it then).

    Also, I didn't really mean a bike that could race, mountain, and road bike at once, I really just meant an all around bike that rides comfortably, has speed, and has a frame that does not look novelty.

    I would like decent front suspension as I know most Hardtails still have a suspension fork, but I will probably have to buy used or online because the cheapest bike in both of my LBSs is $450, and $300 is pushing it for me as it is because I am a student and have no job. Well, I would be lying if I said the cheapest was $450, I mean the cheapes ADULT bike is $450.

    I do know that is a pretty low value, but I will also post a want ad on here for a bike because there are some people who just need some money. I also might find a good craigslist deal. Last week I found a Specialized Enduro FSR for $250 on Craigslist, but then I didn't have the money AND I wasn't available to look at it.

    Anyways, if anyone knows of any good bikes in general with at least one type of suspension that is high quality and meets a decent number of needs and wants I listed, I would really appreciate to know.
    It's as easy as riding a bike...badly

  13. #13
    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    Dual suspension is the absolutely worst thought for a commuter. Even front suspension is pretty much useless unless part of your commute is off-road.

  14. #14
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Not really understanding why you need suspension to ride on the road......

    What you need is something like this.

    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Get a fully sprung saddle for comfort.

    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    I'm going to go ahead and recommend an older rigid MTB, maybe something with front suspension if you really want it. Like pretty much everyone else here I don't think you need full suspension or even front suspension for that matter. Your bike is a crappy dept. store POS and I can't see why you would want to replace it with a similar dept store POS in a larger size.

    Also, the bike in the above 2 posts is not what you need, nor do you need a $120 plus saddle. you "need" something cheaper, older, but relatively similar.
    All You Haters Suck My Pawls.

  17. #17
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kludgefudge View Post
    I'm going to go ahead and recommend an older rigid MTB, maybe something with front suspension if you really want it. Like pretty much everyone else here I don't think you need full suspension or even front suspension for that matter. Your bike is a crappy dept. store POS and I can't see why you would want to replace it with a similar dept store POS in a larger size.

    Also, the bike in the above 2 posts is not what you need, nor do you need a $120 plus saddle. you "need" something cheaper, older, but relatively similar.
    That style of bike saddle and that style of bike is what I was referring to. I already said there is no way he can find what he needs for that price new.
    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    I recommend a Giant Glory. It's perfect for commuting.

    [IMG]http://****************/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/2011-giant-glory-01-downhill-mtb.jpg[/IMG]

  19. #19
    Old School Rad mtnbiker66's Avatar
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    I have totally enjoyed this thread. It has been very edumakational.......
    Like a circus monkey on a stolen Harley......

  20. #20
    Caustic Soccer Mom apclassic9's Avatar
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    look around for a used hardtail MTB - I'm sure you can find one for $300! http://cgi.ebay.com/Haro-Vector-V2-V...item2c57d75442 is probably what you're looking for. (uh, and, that's not me selling that!!)
    As with mud, life, too, slides by.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowandsteady View Post
    That style of bike saddle and that style of bike is what I was referring to. I already said there is no way he can find what he needs for that price new.
    Sorry, I wasn't trying to be a dick.

    I'll put my money where my mouth is and provide a link to a basic version of something similar to the rendering of a bicycle you posted.

    http://bicycleworldrgv.com/product/r....5-50841-1.htm

    If the OP had to go new, these are a reasonable amount of bike for the buck at $330 or so and would probably suit his needs quite well.
    All You Haters Suck My Pawls.

  22. #22
    Absorbent Newcomer ScooTrikkeBike's Avatar
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    Thanks Again...

    Thanks for all of the additional input everyone.

    It seems like have all rejected the possibility that the Jeep Cherokee has acceptable components. My original intention was to purchase it and take it to my LBS to be assembled professionally. Although that would cost as much as their CHEAPEST bike, I was mainly considering the fact that a well assembled bike with decent (I have heard that my front and rear derailleur would need replacing if I ever got into serious mountain biking) and that the rear suspension is a covered coil spring, but considering a decent air shock costs about the same price as my entire budget, I don't see that as a problem. In general, I am not questioning anyone's opinions, but I was rather inquiring that if it were professionally assembled and adjusted, would it be as good as the cheapest LBS bike?

    I had also considered the Forge Sawback 7xx and now the 5xx (because it is fully Deore equipped), but both of those are a bit out of my price range. But, could anyone vouch for those bikes as decent? Here are their specs:

    Sawback 7xx

    # All-aluminum, double-butted lightweight frame
    # AVID BB-5 mechanical disc brakeset for ultimate stopping
    # Manitou Axel fork suspension and rear suspension smooth out the terrain
    # Shimano Acera 24-speed derailleur and Shimano Acera shifters
    # WTB SpeedDisc XC rims, saddle and grips for real quality
    # Manufacturer Suggested Age: 18 Years and Up
    # Maximum Weight Capacity: 250.0 Lb.
    # Bicycle Frame Height: 19.5"
    # Bicycle Frame/Component Features: Suspension Fork
    # Bicycle Frame Material: Aluminum
    # Seat Features: Ergonomic
    # Wheel Features: Quick Release Front Wheel
    # Wheel Height: 26"
    # Rim Material: Metal Alloy
    # Tire Type: Knobby
    # Tire Width: 2.10"
    # Suspension Type: Full
    # Derailleur Manufacturer/Type: Shimano Acera
    # Shifter Manufacturer/Type: Shimano Deore
    # Brake System: Disc
    # Gear Speeds: 24
    # Bicycle Chain Material: Aluminum
    # Used For: All Mountain
    # Fitness Goal: Low Impact Cardiovascular Fitness
    # Includes: Water Bottle Mount
    # Care and Cleaning: Wipe Clean With a Damp Cloth
    # Dimensions: Height: 43.7 "; Length: 69.0 "; Width: 16.5 "
    # Product Weight: 33.0 Lb.
    # Warranty Description: 1 Year Manufacturer Warranty Aluminum Frame Only, 1 Year Limited Manufacturer Warranty on Parts

    I would prefer the 7xx for the suspension, but the 5xx has better components (or so I've heard). I am sure my LBS has no bike Deore equipped for under $700, so even that makes it a better deal for me. But, the Acera bikes start at $550 there, so I would think that having one beats an LBS bike, especially if assembled by an LBS.

    Sawback 5xx:

    # All-aluminum, double-butted lightweight frame with WTB SpeedDisc XC rims, saddle and grips for real quality
    # Shimano Deore 27-speed derailleur and Shimano Deore shifters
    # AVID BB-5 mechanical disc brakeset for ultimate stopping
    # RockShox Dart 1: 100mm travel with preload front suspension
    # Truvativ ISOflow aluminum triple crankset
    # Manufacturer Suggested Age: 18 Years and Up
    # Maximum Weight Capacity: 250.0 Lb.
    # Bicycle Frame Height: 19"
    # Bicycle Frame/Component Features: Suspension Fork
    # Bicycle Frame Material: Aluminum
    # Seat Features: Ergonomic
    # Wheel Features: Quick Release Front Wheel
    # Wheel Height: 26"
    # Rim Material: Metal Alloy
    # Tire Type: Knobby
    # Tire Width: 2.10"
    # Suspension Type: Front
    # Derailleur Manufacturer/Type: Shimano Deore
    # Shifter Manufacturer/Type: Shimano Deore
    # Brake System: Disc
    # Gear Speeds: 27
    # Bicycle Chain Material: Aluminum
    # Used For: All Mountain
    # Fitness Goal: Low Impact Cardiovascular Fitness
    # Includes: Water Bottle Mount
    # Care and Cleaning: Wipe Clean With a Damp Cloth
    # Product Weight: 30.0 Lb.
    # Warranty Description: 1 Year Limited Manufacturer Warranty on Parts, 1 Year Manufacturer Warranty Aluminum Frame Only

    But, those two are hypothetical, as right now I only have enough for the Cherokee. But, after seeing some reviews of a comparable bike, the GMC topkick, on here it seemed like most people who hadn't ridden it were making fun of it, but the ones who actually did thought that it needed some work, but when Deore equipped, worked as a very good bike. Their main issue was the shifters (microshift), but the Cherokee has Shimano (doesn't say which, but if it has indicators, I am guessing Acera), it is lighter, and it has full disc brakes (although I have heard promax 320's are entry level).

    I guess I am stuck on full suspension because most of the hardtails I've ridden at the LBS I didn't like, but then again, those were the ones I could actually imagine buying someday.

    But, has anyone ACTUALLY RIDDEN the Cherokee, because I have found no reviews on it anywhere.

    Sorry if this makes anyone angry, I just want to know.
    It's as easy as riding a bike...badly

  23. #23
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    You are missing the point.

    I am sure when properly set up the Jeep bikes will work fine. But for the same money you can get a rigid bike with better components. What do good components give you? In my opinion, almost any modern components will work fine when new. The difference comes after a month or two or a year when things start to wear out - this time will come much sooner with cheap components than it will with better ones.

    Also, because of the limitations of economics and engineering, a full suspension bike is heavier, less efficient, and needs more maintenance. The result is that riding will be less fun and you will ride less.

    And because the suspension is just springs instead of real shock absorbers, it will do almost nothing to smooth out the ride or make you feel less tired after a ride.

    So your choice is this: Buy a heavy inefficient creaky bike that needs more maintenance and costs more but has no advantages, or get a simple higher quality bike that is more fun to ride.

    There are two things you can pay for: 'features' and 'quality.' If you have $30,000 to buy a new car would you rather buy the base model of a nice BMW or new Camaro or F150, or would you rather have a shiny new Kia with a heads-up-display windshield, two CD players, and a carbon fiber wing on the back?

    Suspension and disk brakes are 'features' that may or may not be worth paying for... but if you get suspension and disk brakes on a $300 bike you are not getting 'quality.'


    Edit:

    I should clarify: When I say 'components' I am not referring to derailleurs. Derailleurs are the cheapest and easiest parts on a bicycle to replace. People saying they replaced their Acera derailleurs with Deore and instantly had an improvement in performance are either ignorant, delusional, or lying to justify the money spent... or had the Acera stuff set up badly in the first place.
    Derailleurs are where bike companies spend a little bit of cash to trick customers into thinking the bike is higher quality than it actually is, and many customers walk in to bike shops to go 'rear derailleur shopping' - they confidently push the bikes apart and strain to see what Shimano group the rear derailleurs are then feel as though they know all they need to know.

    All other moving parts - chains, hubs, headsets, chainrings, suspension forks, pivots, even spokes and rims, are as important - or more important - but these are totally cheaped-out on department store bikes - even on the Forges... how do you think they sell them so cheap?
    (Although the Forge bikes look miles better than the Jeep bikes... if I were you I would look at the Forge M Street bike - it looks like a simple, good value bike.)

    The other thing to keep in mind is that the fit of a bike is more important than whether the derailleurs or hubs are SLX or Alivio. A 16 pound racing bike with electronic shifting is worthless if it gives you a sore back.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 10-14-10 at 10:13 PM.

  24. #24
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    Thanks again For all of the feedback.

    Hello All,

    Thank you for all of the feedback overall and I am now very well educated on bikes in comparison to my prior knowledge.

    I have decided to go for the Forge Sawback 5xx in Matte Blue. It has a 19" and should fit me fine. Although I haven't tried the exact bike, I have tried a 19" frame and feel that I have more control on a frame that is a bit too small than a bit too big (my father has a Fuji Sports 12 road bike with a 23" frame that I use when I visit him).

    Overall, I really am not a huge fan of hardtail bikes for their PERSONAL fit, but the Sawback 5xx at least has front suspension and is really well built for its price from what I have heard. I am planning on purchasing a Cane Creek Thudbuster Seat Post for it in a month or so once I have the money for it (they're really spendy) because I heard their LT model does a good job or simulating a full suspension feel on an HT bike.

    I was originally debating over getting that or a brooks B190 saddle because they both provide excellent suspension, but I am leaning towards the thudbuster because the WTB Sports V saddle that comes with the Sawback I have heard is pretty decent. Overall, I think my total cost will be around $450, but for its components that sure beats the heck out of ANYTHING I have come across in my LBS.

    However, I have heard I may have to replace the wheels (WTB SPEEDDISC rims 14G Stainless steel spokes, Joytech alloy QR Disc 32H hubs and ITS Ninja 26" x 2.1" tires) because I weight usually between 255 and 265 lbs (depending on the type of exercise I focused on at the moment) and some have said that the wheels on the Sawback won't be able to handle that kind of weight. Of course, I know it can handle it because my little Wally Mart Mongoose built for kids under 120 lbs can handle my weight (given I have ridden it for a month and the rims are near elliptical and I pedal inward and outward now), but whether it will be at maximum performance is the real question.

    I am thinking the thudbuster will help and I am planning on buying the Purple elastomers for it, but the bike's weight limit is 250 lbs and the elastomer weight limit is 250 lbs, so would I possibly be to clyde for my setup?

    Any feedback on my decision or answers regarding the saddle vs the thudbuster, possible bie/elastomer/wheel/hub weight issues would be helpful. (I may just have to drop a few pounds though)
    It's as easy as riding a bike...badly

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScooTrikkeBike View Post
    I am pretty sure this is a contradiction for most experienced bikers, but I am looking for a decent bike with full suspension (mountain, hybrid, whatever) with a budget of $300. The frame should be able to fit me, and I'm 6'0" and 245 lbs.

    I know $300 is not a lot, but I hope it is enough for something. .....
    You're not going to find anything with all you want, new, for that cheap.

    I (unlike many others) will not blame you for wanting full-suspension on a street bike.
    It is the way of the future, and all mainstream bikes will have full-suspension eventually,,, even street bikes. Even road-only bikes. Even "Lance Armstrong, TdF-style" bikes.
    The same tired arguments that people use now against full (rear) suspension bikes, is what they said 15 years ago about front-suspension bikes.

    (ahem)

    You cannot do it that cheap, but you can start.
    What I might suggest is you get the best front-suspension model you can for that price right now.
    Then go get a Thudbuster seatpost to put on it, to cushion the "back end".

    Do Note:
    ....the Thudbuster is not cheap, and there are other cheaper suspension seatposts.... but they are not built nearly as well. The Thudbuster will help a lot with pavement riding comfort. (suspension seatposts are a theft risk,,, especially nicer ones--so take out the seatpost clamp quick-release and use a regular bolt there instead)

    ....Also,,, the front fork will squeak eventually and replacement parts aren't available. The way to fix that problem is to upgrade to some name-brand suspension forks. You can usually find the past year's low-end Rockshox for around $150 or so if you look around online.
    ~

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