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  1. #1
    Six feet please Noobtastic's Avatar
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    My seatpost is seriously stuck

    I think I'm done with working on my ross gran tour road bike. The wheels/tires/tubes/chain are new, the brakes work well, all bearings have been cleaned and regreased. The frame is a heavy as my mtb so I converted it to SS.

    The seatpost is the only thing that gets to me; it seems to be stuck in position due to a combination of no grease, rust, and spraypaint. Its stuck about 6 inches lower than I'd prefer to have it. I've ridden 50 miles on this bike a few months ago and within about 30 miles I could really feel the pressure on my groin. I rode about 20 miles on my friend's road bike and I noticed that I have much better control with a higher seatpost (can pedal far with no hands) and I felt very comfortable in jeans (as opposed to my bike in bike shorts).

    I want to ride another half century on x-mas eve and I really want to feel comfortable on my saddle; last time I rode the distance I was so tired because I tried to ride standing up as much as possible. I've sprayed lots of penetrating oil inside the seattube, pulled on the seat as a friend held the frame, and ridden miles with the seattube bolt loose but the seatpost has not moved an inch. Does anyone have a suggestion?

  2. #2
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    Take the seat off and wrap on the post with a hammer to break it loose.

    If you have truly exhausted all safe methods of removal, it may be time to look at more destructive ways of removal, such as heat and or using a pipe wrench to get a better grip and buy a new post when you get it out. Just remember to lube before you insert the new one.
    Last edited by Bruzer; 12-22-10 at 09:32 PM.

  3. #3
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    You'd have better luck searching the "Bicycle Mechanics" forum for previous solutions. This is a subject that's been dealt with many times.

    But... if you're looking to raise the seat 6 inches, you probably have a frame that's much too small. You should sell it and find a bike that fits your body.
    Jeff Wills

    All my bikes.

  4. #4
    Sputnik - beep beep beep Wake's Avatar
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    Try drilling a hole in the post and rigging a bolt so you can use a slide hammer. There's not much that will resist a few raps from one of those.

  5. #5
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    As noted, there are several ongoing threads on the subject in the mechanic's section, and an article posted on the Harris Cyclery section.

  6. #6
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Once you do get your post out coat the outside length that goes in the bike with ANTI-SIZE (find at auto or farm supply) and you'll never worry again !!
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Ammonia, poured in thru the BB into the seat tube on an upside down bike,
    is one of the techniques spoken of before..
    yea you have to take the cranks off and the bb out.

  8. #8
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    Second the motion for ammonia, assuming the Ross is steel and the post is aluminum. That's spoze to dissolve whatever that stuff is that forms and makes a bond. Don't know if it works with two aluminum parts. I've also removed the seat and hammered the post to get it moving, and clamped the post in a vise so I could rotate the frame (more leverage than a wrench). These latter two may require sacrifice of the post.
    Another trick is to cut the post off with a hacksaw, leaving an inch or two exposed, then use the hacksaw blade to CAREFULLY cut a slot in the post from top to bottom (not as tricky as it sounds; aluminum is much softer than the steel), then wrench it again or work a chisel around in there to break things loose. There's potential for destruction in any of these.

  9. #9
    Six feet please Noobtastic's Avatar
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    I'm not sure about what the seatpost is made out of, it looks like a pipe rather than a seatpost. I think I was exaggerating about having to raise the post six inches; I actually rode around the neighborhood hovering at my perfect seat height and measured the difference to be about 3-4 inches, besides the bike is an eyesore that will never sell (which is why I love to ride it around).
    I'm going to call my friend to help me try a super torque method with a stick through the rails of the saddle I barely have bike tools let alone a hacksaw or a drill, I hope this works.

  10. #10
    Senior Member xizangstan's Avatar
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    Back when I was a kid, we used to be able to get M-80 firecrackers... Nevermind. That's too hard on people when she blows.
    Who is John Galt?

  11. #11
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Get access to a bench vise, and have a new post on hand. Remove the wheels and the crank. Clamp the seatpost into the vise as tight as possible, then try removing the frame from the post. You may need a second person.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  12. #12
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    I've heard that if you have different metals for the post and frame, and don't adequately lube the post, it's possible for the post to galvanically weld to the frame. It's basically impossible to remove at that point. I don't know how true that is, but I wonder if that's what has happened to your bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruzer View Post
    Take the seat off and wrap on the post with a hammer to break it loose.

    If you have truly exhausted all safe methods of removal, it may be time to look at more destructive ways of removal, such as heat and or using a pipe wrench to get a better grip and buy a new post when you get it out. Just remember to lube before you insert the new one.
    This may not work and can make matters worse. Get two cheap large rubber mallets of the same size. About $1.50 each at harbor freight tools. Then try to soak some WD-40 into the joint and let it sit awhile. Take the seat off and clamp the end of the seat post into some kind of a strong clamping mechanism. Now, get two people to help you. One person will get at one end of the bike frame and the other at the other and work together in a twisting motion using the frame as leverage. Remove the wheels first and put pressure near the rear wheel dropout and on the head tube. Not the fork. The other person with one mallet in each hand will rap in unison one each side of the seat tube. Not too hard but firm. Trying to time the blows at exactly the same time right across from each other. The other guys twist and pull back and forth. I had a seat post so stubborn that I had to use a large lathe chuck to hold the seat post with the transmission locked. But we got it out, and it had been outside for a couple of years and rusted together. Try the twisting method without the mallet blows first to see if you can get it out.
    Last edited by Hezz; 12-25-10 at 09:58 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noobtastic View Post
    I'm not sure about what the seatpost is made out of, it looks like a pipe rather than a seatpost. I think I was exaggerating about having to raise the post six inches; I actually rode around the neighborhood hovering at my perfect seat height and measured the difference to be about 3-4 inches, besides the bike is an eyesore that will never sell (which is why I love to ride it around).
    I'm going to call my friend to help me try a super torque method with a stick through the rails of the saddle I barely have bike tools let alone a hacksaw or a drill, I hope this works.
    The guys in the machine shop at the local community college may be willing to help you. The best way and least damaging way to clamp the seat post is to chuck it in collet in a large manual engine lathe. Then twist on the frame at the front and rear dropouts. This can put a lot of torque on the joint. IF it's an old steel frame bike it will probably break loose before the frame bends. Make short twisting motions. It will more than likely break free without damaging the frame.

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