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-   -   Eco-Friendly Jerseys? (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/709098-eco-friendly-jerseys.html)

buffalo_cody 01-24-11 10:47 AM

Eco-Friendly Jerseys?
 
Does anybody know of source for eco-friendly bike jerseys? Something like recycled PET, or sustainable materials (bamboo, wool), maybe even made in the U.S.A?

I found this one (recycled PET & made in the U.S.A) but I was wondering what my other options might be.

Thanks

ChrisO 01-26-11 02:32 AM

http://mtborah.com/our-products/jers...onth-march-10/
Not all of their jerseys are "eco-friendly", but this particular one claims to be.

XR2 01-26-11 09:13 AM

What's wrong with wool?

calamarichris 01-26-11 11:14 AM

I don't consider Polyester eco-unfriendly because I've got jerseys that I still wear regularly which are more than 20 years old.
I still regularly wear my first pair of Descente cycling shorts which I bought back in 1986. The lycra has begun to biodegrade and doesn't have much elasticity left to it, but for rollers sessions all you need is a good chamois and enough fabric to hold it in place. By the time I'm done with those shorts, I can't imagine there'll be much left for the landfill.

Haha--here's my old, Dutch club-jersey from 1989:
http://www.calamarichris.com/images/100306-chrbaldy.jpg

Bianchigirll 01-26-11 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by XR2 (Post 12134394)
What's wrong with wool?

Sheep are a leading contributor to green house gases

buffalo_cody 01-26-11 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by XR2 (Post 12134394)
What's wrong with wool?

Depending on the source, nothing at all. The wool industry does have it's issues, a google search will bring up a ton of stuff if you're curious (I'm not starting that thread though). I was just wondering if there's additional options out there.

XR2 01-26-11 12:27 PM

Well if you want to go that route the clothing industry has huge human rights issues. Especially in Asia. It was an honest question.

pwdeegan 02-02-11 02:42 AM

cycle naked

TurbineBlade 02-02-11 04:31 AM

The most green would be to wear stuff you already have, which is what I do - not because it's "green" so much as it is just something that works for me and I see no reason to change.

I'd say wool is fairly green too, since you are likely to wear the same wool clothing for years.

Humans, cattle, pigs, volcanoes, and some species of conifers are also leading contributors of greenhouse gases.


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