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  1. #26
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flanso View Post
    Some tires have the letter C following the width, 700 x 25c, for example. What does the C mean?
    It's a width size - like in shoes.

    In this case, when the tire gets wider it also gets taller. A 700d tire has roughly the same circumference as a 700c, but it's bead diameter is smaller so a 700c tire won't fit on a 700d rim.

  2. #27
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    French sizing scheme : theres a 700 a & b and the C ..

    ETRO is the agreement between Tire and Rim manufacturers ,
    on dimensions to be compatible.

    use those.. 622-25 mm in this example.. a better designation,

    that will be molded into the tire, sidewall, itself, these days.



    2 years on I hope the OP got this sorted by now..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 08-02-13 at 10:17 AM.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
    Oh good, a thread bumped to add incorrect information.
    If you know the correct information, it would be great to know what it is.

    I wasn't posting that info because I claim that it's correct. I was posting it in the hopes that some brilliant individual such as yourself, would either confirm it, or provide the correct information so that I, and anyone else who is looking this up could LEARN it.

    See how that works?

  4. #29
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by killerB View Post
    If you know the correct information, it would be great to know what it is.

    I wasn't posting that info because I claim that it's correct. I was posting it in the hopes that some brilliant individual such as yourself, would either confirm it, or provide the correct information so that I, and anyone else who is looking this up could LEARN it.

    See how that works?
    The correct answer was in the second post, had you read it -- adding misleading information so that people would have to correct you is not the right way to stimulate learning.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
    The correct answer was in the second post, had you read it -- adding misleading information so that people would have to correct you is not the right way to stimulate learning.
    OK, well I can see that you're in a great mood today!

    I DID read the Sheldon Brown article, and have read every post in this thread. I, and the OP are looking for the meaning of the SECOND letter designation. i.e. 700x25C

    If you're referring to this section of the article:

    "In the French system, the first number is the nominal diameter in mm, followed by a letter code for the width: "A" is narrow, "D" is wide. The letter codes no longer correspond to the tire width..."

    It looks like that's in reference to the FIRST letter in the naming convention, because right below it, there's a chart listing 700 C, 650 B, etc.

    Can you point this ignorant and apparently reckless disseminator of bad information to the part of the article where he explains the second letter?

    If you're saying that they are one in the same, well then, I guess I learned something.

  6. #31
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    The plan, as I grasp it, was to have the nominal tire diameter be close..

    so if a wide tire the rim is smaller , a thin tire the rim is larger .

    the 600, 650 700 is approximate category for over-all Diameter of the wheel with the tire on it.


    The 20" wheel, breaks down to be 406 and 451 rims wider tire on 406 , thinner tire on 451.. same sort of concept.

  7. #32
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by killerB View Post
    OK, well I can see that you're in a great mood today!

    I DID read the Sheldon Brown article, and have read every post in this thread. I, and the OP are looking for the meaning of the SECOND letter designation. i.e. 700x25C

    If you're referring to this section of the article:

    "In the French system, the first number is the nominal diameter in mm, followed by a letter code for the width: "A" is narrow, "D" is wide. The letter codes no longer correspond to the tire width..."

    It looks like that's in reference to the FIRST letter in the naming convention, because right below it, there's a chart listing 700 C, 650 B, etc.

    Can you point this ignorant and apparently reckless disseminator of bad information to the part of the article where he explains the second letter?

    If you're saying that they are one in the same, well then, I guess I learned something.
    And you're a really demanding newbie.

    The convention is to move the "C" after the tire width when it is discussed specifically, as in 700x32C or 650x42B. Don't ask me why, ask the French -- they came up with this system long before hooked rims existed.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  8. #33
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    That makes sense. Well , as much sense as random French sizing standards can. Thanks for confirmation.

  9. #34
    ouate de phoque dramiscram's Avatar
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    'C' is for 'Caoutchouc'. It's a french word...


    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caoutchouc_(mat%C3%A9riau)
    Last edited by dramiscram; 08-02-13 at 11:27 AM.
    Originally Posted by Leebo

    Headwind is like a hill without a soul. Just gear down and suffer.
    Quote Originally Posted by jrickards View Post
    Headwinds are hills dipped in evil!

  10. #35
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dramiscram View Post
    'C' is for 'Caoutchouc'. It's a french word...


    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caoutchouc_(mat%C3%A9riau)
    wrong
    the c stands for calice
    the french word for chalice
    used as an explitive in french canada
    uttered the first time they saw how fast a road bike was

  11. #36
    Senior Member
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    The "c" denotes the optimal air temperature in Celsius for that particular tire's performance.
    We have met the enemy and they is us.

    Pogo

  12. #37
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    In the modern day, the C means that the bead seat is 622mm and is a carry over from the French system for tyre sizing.

    The 700A was 642, 700B was 635 which is a roadster tyre, and the 700D was a very wide tyre on a 584 rim that GT played with that is very close to the 650B which is now getting used on more off road bikes and seeing a resurgence on other bicycles.

    If the designation has a C it fits a 622 rim.

    Although I prefer using ISO measurements it is helpful to know the traditional measurements.

  13. #38
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    wrong
    the c stands for calice
    the french word for chalice
    used as an explitive in french canada
    uttered the first time they saw how fast a road bike was
    Then the C should have been an S for Sacrament !!!

  14. #39
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    S for Sacrament


    Yea but the tire factories are in SE Asia, where the rubber plantations are,
    it was never part of the Holy Roman Empire

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