Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-21-04, 03:28 PM   #1
Laggard
Lance Hater
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Bike Rack Design

Is it just me, or does it seem that most bike racks are designed by people who've never had to lock up a bike in their life?

What are the best and worst designs.
Laggard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 03:38 PM   #2
Seeker
Old dude on old bikes
 
Seeker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Houston, Tx.
Bikes:
Posts: 155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
definately the worst is the infamous wheel bender. Only maginally functional is the type that is nothing more then a wavy pipe with a bunch of U bends. Most of the time when I use a bike rack I just lock up to the end of the rack and not in the rack.
Seeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 03:43 PM   #3
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The worst design is the rack found at most public schools. Holds the rear tire, and no place to put a U-lock.

The best rack is one I have not yrt seen. It would be the top half of a "hula hoop" made out of a steel tube three inches wide. The two ends would be about 24 inches apart, both set into two feet of concrete. This design makes it possible to lock two bikes to a rack that is only three inches wide. Both the front and rear wheels of the bike can be locked with U-locks to the hoop.

The "hoop" rack would be cheap to make. A university could put about ten hoops, holding twenty bikes, in the space it takes to park one SUV.
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 03:53 PM   #4
repeatx3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Hawaii
Bikes:
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh yeah that does sound like a good design!
repeatx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 03:57 PM   #5
AndrewP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Montreal
Bikes: Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
Posts: 6,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ring built into parking meter, or fence with steel bars.
AndrewP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 03:59 PM   #6
dobber
Perineal Pressurized
 
dobber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: In Ebritated
Bikes:
Posts: 6,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I find the chainlink fence I lean mine against at work to be functional yet oh-so discrete.

Occasionally it blows over at which point the guard calls me to let me know.

I have asked our plant personnel manager if I could have a rack. Figure if we got a motorcycle parking zone, 20 handicap spots (which is hilarious since we are a heavy manufacturing facility) and 5 spots for goverment vehicles, I could get a decent parking spot, maybe even out of the rain.

I actually figure I should just make one and install it one night.
dobber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 05:06 PM   #7
Laggard
Lance Hater
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seeker
Only maginally functional is the type that is nothing more then a wavy pipe with a bunch of U bends.
I've never been able to figure out how to use those.
Laggard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-04, 05:18 PM   #8
CMcMahon
member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: San Jose, CA
Bikes: Solid AA
Posts: 4,751
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
San Jose State has some nice ones in the locked enclosures. Just to get into them (or out, for that matter) you either have to have an electronic key or have to scale a ten-foot tall fence with spikes on the top. And the racks in there are individual for each bike, and are set up so that you can lean your bike against them by the seattube and lock it with that; the best way to describe the shape would be an a-frame with a kink at the bottom.
CMcMahon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 01:03 AM   #9
Raiyn
I drink your MILKSHAKE
 
Raiyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR Comp, 1999 Specialized Hardrock Comp FS, 1971 Schwinn Varsity
Posts: 15,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This is my favorite design Bikelid


Followed by this design Bike bank

__________________
Raiyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 01:19 AM   #10
Avalanche325
Senior Member
 
Avalanche325's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pasadena, CA
Bikes: Litespeed Firenze / GT Avalanche
Posts: 3,162
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That looks like a $1000 rack for a $200 bike.

I actually know a guy that put a $1000 sterio in his car and then put in a $2500 alarm system to protect it. What a dork.
Avalanche325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 01:40 AM   #11
Raiyn
I drink your MILKSHAKE
 
Raiyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR Comp, 1999 Specialized Hardrock Comp FS, 1971 Schwinn Varsity
Posts: 15,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Actually the bike bank is $270
__________________
Raiyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 10:45 AM   #12
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
The best rack is probably the Sheffield Rack, an inverted U of 3" thick steel, embedded in concrete and reaching level with the top tube of a medium bike. You can lock a bike each side. Placed en-echelon they take up little width.
They are pretty common in the UK but usually placed badly. I have seen versions placed with one end 6" from a wall. Ive seen them placed with a lamp post inbetween (losing 2 spaces) or so close together you can only fit one bike. They are often located exactly where pedestrians want to walk. The local supermarket has a lovely set of Sheffield racks, but then added a set of the "Bike Bank" type of racks (see above). Guess where they put the banks? In between the Sheffield racks where the bikes usually go.
The Bank type racks are OK for long term storage at railway stations, but are too complex for quick stops, and often scratch the frame.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 11:08 AM   #13
Laggard
Lance Hater
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I hate these:



?:



This seems to be my favorite:




I like to run my U-lock through my front tire and frame. Then I usually use a short cable lock to keep the rear wheel connected to the frame.
Laggard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 11:10 AM   #14
Boudicca
Conquer Cancer rider
 
Boudicca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: Fun bike, city bike, Bike Friday, Brompton (also fun bikes)
Posts: 5,991
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Toronto has some "post and ring" locks http://www.toronto.ca/cycling/map/th...ks_lockers.htm which can just about fit two bikes if the first person parks carefully. But the metal they are made of is rough and abrasive and it's scraped the paint off the forks of both my bikes, leaving sheer, gleaming metal. Not quite ideal, methinks.
Boudicca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 01:49 PM   #15
Da Tinker
Can't ride enough!
 
Da Tinker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: south Louisiana
Bikes: IFab Crown Jewel, Giant Defy, Hardtail MTB, Fuji finest, Bianchi FG conversion
Posts: 1,235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
These guys: http://www.dero.com/ have some great racks.
I am trying to get the Industrial Design class at the local college to do a bike rack project. The racks should be thematic, either matching the buildings design, or what the building is for, or the type of business.
Da Tinker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 01:53 PM   #16
520commuter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Bikes:
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I like the inverted U design. There a lot of them at the university here. They work real well.
520commuter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-04, 04:14 PM   #17
Raiyn
I drink your MILKSHAKE
 
Raiyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Bikes: 2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR Comp, 1999 Specialized Hardrock Comp FS, 1971 Schwinn Varsity
Posts: 15,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laggard
I hate these:


This seems to be my favorite:




I like to run my U-lock through my front tire and frame. Then I usually use a short cable lock to keep the rear wheel connected to the frame.
I disagree with your lock strategy. The rear wheel is more expensive to replace than the front.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
If you use both the U-lock and the cable lock at work, you are more than twice as safe as you would be with either of them alone. Either type of lock can be defeated, but each requires a different large, bulky tool which is useless against the other.

Don't take your bike apart to lock it, it is really bogus. The cable lock will secure your front wheel to the frame and any convenient object, and the U-lock will secure your rear wheel and frame. If you have a quick-release seatpost bolt, replace it with an Allen head bolt, and stop worrying about having your saddle stolen.
A U-lock should go around the rear rim and tire, somewhere inside the rear triangle of the frame. There is no need to loop it around the seat tube as well, because the wheel cannot be pulled through the rear triangle.

Some will object that felons might cut the rear rim and tire to remove the lock. Believe me, this just doesn't happen in the real world. First, this would be a lot of work to steal a frame without a useable rear wheel, the most expensive part of a bike, after the frame. Second, cutting the rear rim is much harder than you might think. Since the rim is under substantial compression due to the tension on the spokes, it would pinch a hacksaw blade tight as soon as it cut partway through. Then there are the wire beads of the tire, also difficult to cut.
__________________
Raiyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:08 PM.