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  1. #1
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    Resting and Maximum Heart Rates

    I understand my Garmin Edge 500 will give me a better calories burned count if I enter my resting heart rate and maximum heart rate. I need help figuring out what those values would be.

    I'm 27 years old. 5'9 1/2" - 163lbs (little fat, more muscle) - In good shape..

    My maximum HR's on rides range between 185 and 187 on a real maximum dyeing effort on a 17% grade half mile long hill the second time around... I've gotten readings such as 200 bpm but I assume that's just wind and flapping jersey or one of those bugs..

    Should my max be set to 187?
    What about the resting HR? 68? 70?

    Lastly, what is the HRR (Heart Rate Reserve) exactly? I know the formula involves subtracting the resting rate..

    Thanks!!!

  2. #2
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    First thing when you wake up in the morning, before you get out of bed, check your pulse. That's your resting heart rate.
    Someone else can advise on max HR and HRR.
    I need to get a HRM someday.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

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    Thanks JanMM. Now if only someone would help with regards to the Max and HRR....

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    Sausage King
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    The only real way to know your max HR is to get tested in a lab on a treadmill. What has become the standard formula to figure max HR is 220-you age in years. That might be close, but not exact. There is some debate about how accurate that formula really is.

    HRR is simply your max HR minus your resting HR. It is just a measure of HR potential.

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    Dan J chinarider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abe Froman View Post
    There is some debate about how accurate that formula really is.
    There is no real debate: it's not accurate at all. At best it represents an average (and there is reason to believe it's not even a very accurate average). However, there is a very wide variance and it's useless for any particular individual. It's like saying the average male is 5'10". It doesn't tell you what size pants to buy. As with height, the only way to know your own MHR is to measure it.
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    Thank you everyone! I'm beggining to understand it more.

    For the sake of entering something on Garmin Connect and have a better calories burned count, I'll enter 190 and 70.

    Thanks again.

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    Commuter & cyclotourist brianogilvie's Avatar
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    The Wikipedia entry on heart rate is actually useful.

    And Chinarider is right: the 220-age formula is inaccurate. There are better formulas but they also lead to an average. I'm 43; according to the formula my MHR should be 177, but I've measured it at 193.

    Resting heart rate (RHR) is easily determined. Don't just enter 70; instead, hook up your heart rate monitor, lie down and relax, and wait a few minutes. Then turn on the timer. Stay calm and still. After a couple of minutes, turn it off again. Use the average HR as your RHR. Don't do this after you've been working out, since your heart takes time to recover. I habitually take my pulse first thing in the morning; I've noticed a wide variation in RHR, from 52 if I am well rested to over 60 if I slept poorly, am stressed, or overindulged on food or booze the previous evening.

    Heart rate reserve is simply the difference between MHR and RHR. Some aerobic training methods use RHR plus percentages of HRR, rather than percentages of MHR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianogilvie View Post
    The Wikipedia entry on heart rate is actually useful.

    And Chinarider is right: the 220-age formula is inaccurate. There are better formulas but they also lead to an average. I'm 43; according to the formula my MHR should be 177, but I've measured it at 193.

    Resting heart rate (RHR) is easily determined. Don't just enter 70; instead, hook up your heart rate monitor, lie down and relax, and wait a few minutes. Then turn on the timer. Stay calm and still. After a couple of minutes, turn it off again. Use the average HR as your RHR. Don't do this after you've been working out, since your heart takes time to recover. I habitually take my pulse first thing in the morning; I've noticed a wide variation in RHR, from 52 if I am well rested to over 60 if I slept poorly, am stressed, or overindulged on food or booze the previous evening.

    Heart rate reserve is simply the difference between MHR and RHR. Some aerobic training methods use RHR plus percentages of HRR, rather than percentages of MHR.
    Thanks!!

    If I weren't having a dirty martini, I'd measure my RHR right now! I guess it's better to do it in the morning anyway.. one after a non drinking night as you pointed out...

    I'm just still intrigued with regards to the HRR. if this HRReserve= HRM - RHR, let's say for example that max = 190 and rest = 70. So then HRR = 120. Period. So I'll be at 100% of my HRR % at 120 bpm? And the part that's throwing me off: I'll be at over 100% the whole time then!

    Hope it's not the martini's fault.

    Thanks again.

  9. #9
    Dan J chinarider's Avatar
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    Must be the martini. As Brian said, the training methods that use HRR, use RHR plus % of HRR. So using your numbers, if the training method says 75% of HRR reserve, the formula is 70 + (120 x 75%) or 70 + 90 =160.
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    Oh I see it clearly and soberly now!

    With those numbers, at 160 bpm, my garmin would display 75% as the HRR% but 84% MHR% . And of course at 190bpm everything is at 100%.

    So the training methods that use HRR are a better assessment, I guess.

    Thanks!

  11. #11
    Senior Member Keith99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abe Froman View Post
    The only real way to know your max HR is to get tested in a lab on a treadmill. What has become the standard formula to figure max HR is 220-you age in years. That might be close, but not exact. There is some debate about how accurate that formula really is.

    HRR is simply your max HR minus your resting HR. It is just a measure of HR potential.
    At 16 my max heart rate was almost 240. More than a little off. I still wonder if perhaps the excercise involved might have been near perfect for peak heart rate. It was swimming, 100 yard repeats in practice and when we were doing heart rate work I always finished just like I would in a race, head down so no breathing for at least teh last 10 and usually more like the last 15 yards.

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    OK, I found out my RHR is more like in the low 60s if not lower. I sent some values to my Garmin device (edge 500) and see that my HR Max % is now based on the slightly higher max I input (188bpm vs the pre-set 185bpm). However my HRR% is still the same as my HR Max %!! Why is this?

    Will the HRR % only differ at very high bpms? because even some jumping jacks really quick to get to 70% kept them both at the same percentage... intrigued.

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    Mystery solved! Stupid Garmin Connect Site has 3 tabs fot setting up the bpms and zones - default, running, and cycling. I had done it under cycling and it took the max but the not the RHR obviously! I finally figured it out by doing the same while under default and sent it to the device. All good now.

    I rode a few hours ago and my heart is actually on the low 50s , sometimes 49bpm.. I'm entering 45. Wonder if I can go even lower. Will measure in some mornings and average out.

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