Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,325
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    standing up with narrow bars

    hi
    I have a fixed gear bike with narrow bars and I find it very hard to stand up and ride as the bike seems to be, much more unbalanced than when I do it on my other bikes which have wider bars.

    is there some technique to it?

    thanks
    daven

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    My Bikes
    Brodie Force w/ Xtracycle, Dahon Helios, Merida Folding, Pacific Carryme, Softride Classic
    Posts
    789
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One school of thought has the bars as wide as your shoulders. If bars are substantially narrower, it could be a problem.
    __________________________________________
    "You spend the whole time afraid you're weak, but clawing every second knowing that if you can just shut your mind off and turn the pedals 1 more time you're going to be 1 pedal turn closer." -- Psimet

  3. #3
    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    7,271
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Probably not be the bars. Front end geometry, rake and trail, are the major contributor to handling behavior like this. Compare how easy the bikes are to balance riding hands-off to get an idea of the difference.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Ffld Cnty Connecticut
    My Bikes
    Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
    Posts
    15,588
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Get wider bars, it can make a significant difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
    Probably not be the bars. Front end geometry, rake and trail, are the major contributor to handling behavior like this. Compare how easy the bikes are to balance riding hands-off to get an idea of the difference.
    On the other hand, try to ride a normal road bike out of the saddle with your hands near the stem. Compare that to moving them out to the levers or drops.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  5. #5
    Senior Member Flying Merkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Costa Mesa CA
    Posts
    2,535
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the bars were narrowed for style instead a functionality, you are S-O-L. I've seen fixies in my 'hood that are fashion items instead of working bikes.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,325
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is my beater bike so I won't be doing any upgrades on it, however I think Loogi is right - it is probably the front end geometry as it is quite different from my other bikes.

    Is there anything I can do, technique wise, to help?

    Thanks

    Daven

  7. #7
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Ffld Cnty Connecticut
    My Bikes
    Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
    Posts
    15,588
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    What are the differents widths on your bikes where your hands are ? Swapping bars isn't a significant upgrade, and if it makes your bike more rideable might be worth the effort. The proper width gives you the right leverage to control the bike while climbing.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  8. #8
    born again cyclist Steely Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    --------------------------- - 2007 Dahon Speed P8 folder ------- - 2010 Motobecane leChampion SL Ti - 2011 Scott SUB 10
    Posts
    1,795
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Merkel View Post
    If the bars were narrowed for style instead a functionality, you are S-O-L. I've seen fixies in my 'hood that are fashion items instead of working bikes.
    i've been curious about the super narrow bar trend that i see among the hipster fixie crowd. i myself have always used the shoulder width rule for bars (what can i say, it works for me), but are there any practical advantages to those really narrow bars? or is it really just a pure style thing that only results in poorer handling?
    The first rule: if you're riding a bike and not having fun, then you're doing it wrong.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Ffld Cnty Connecticut
    My Bikes
    Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
    Posts
    15,588
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
    i've been curious about the super narrow bar trend that i see among the hipster fixie crowd. i myself have always used the shoulder width rule for bars (what can i say, it works for me), but are there any practical advantages to those really narrow bars? or is it really just a pure style thing that only results in poorer handling?
    That's my guess, then blame it on frame geometry.
    Take any bike, ride out of the saddle. Notice the difference as you move your hands closer to the stem.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  10. #10
    Senior Member DGozinya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
    are there any practical advantages to those really narrow bars?
    Skinny bars go nicely with those skinny jeans.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Kayce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    1,846
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The trend of narrow bars started the same place most fixed gear trends started, with bike messengers. Racing through tight traffic, any advantages you have to get through tight spaces helps. Messengers are on their bikes enough to overcome the problems, and learn to ride with the limitations. But to the average person its all limitations with none of the advantages.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •