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  1. #1
    Member goodchap's Avatar
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    How much wheel wobble is still within limits?

    Or whatever the term is for when the wheel is not straight (still perfectly round). Because I might have 1-2 mm now on both wheels after running over a deep pothole that I didnt see...
    I know it`s correctable, I have the knowledge but not the skills to fix it, usually how much they charge at a bike shop to straighten out a rim?

  2. #2
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    This is an easy DIY fix. Squeeze the spokes on the wobble side with your hands to get a feel for them not being too tight (compare them to the other spokes on your wheel). If not, 1/4 turns on the spokes opposite to the wobble. Keep in mind that spokes on the rear wheel, cassette are normally set to higher tension than the non driver side.

    Or, there is one bike shop on your town that is willing to true your wheel for very cheap. Do not go to the shops, call ahead. If they know you are shopping around you'll stand a better chance on getting the best price.

  3. #3
    Member goodchap's Avatar
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    I only know one bike shop in my town. Its not the usual showroom type with salesperson, its a small one with ok prices, and the guy also works on the bikes, his hands are always oily, i think he owns the shop and these type always ask fair prices for labour, but I still need a price reference so I`ll know if he`s trying to rip me off.

    The last time I tried truing a wheel, ended up bending the f out of it. And when finally it was true, it wasnt round but oval...so...dunno I`d just rather pay for someone to do it, everything else i can do myself but not this.

  4. #4
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    Also call ahead because bike season is just picking up so most bike shops are busy and you might have to leave the wheels. If you call you can make an appointment and they'll do the wheels on your schedule.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  5. #5
    Member goodchap's Avatar
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    I hate talking on the phone, plus that the shop is like 5 minutes of riding away from my house (through a park, 40+ minutes with the bus, loltraffic), I`ll stop by and make an appointment if needed, in person. But how much to expect him to charge for the job?

  6. #6
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    If the wheels are salvageable, maybe about $20 per wheel.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  7. #7
    Member goodchap's Avatar
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    Right, thanks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonH View Post
    If the wheels are salvageable,
    The real question.

    My bet is that if the wheels only have a couple millimeters of run out they'll be fixable.

  9. #9
    Sputnik - beep beep beep Wake's Avatar
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    If it's really only 1-2mm side-to-side you should be able to fix it while the wheel's still on the bike. Shouldn't take more than 10 minutes for both wheels. Our shop would probably charge less than $10.

  10. #10
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    I understand your reluctance to trying to bend it back yourself. I messed up my first couple truings pretty bad and kept getting flats, but the shop I brought it from fixed it for free. Since then I've been more careful, but it's something that takes practice with trial and error. I was doing a wheel last year for my Schwinn and tightened one side too much, the wheel looked mutilated, almost like a figure-8. But I started over and got it right. I don't have a truing stand, but I use my mag trainer and put the wheel in. It works really well. A little more practice and I think I can start to do it while it's still on the bike. If your unsure, definitely go to the LBS. But if you'd like to learn and get some experience you can always try it yourself using the instructions above. Even if you make it a little worse, you can always bring it to the LBS to get fixed.

  11. #11
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    Really, it's not hard. For such minor imperfections the wheel can stay on the bike and all you need is a spoke wrench. Be aware that spoke wrenches come in a variety of sizes and one of the circular multiple-size jobs is handy.
    I run the wheel around with my fingertip up against the rim. High spots are immediately apparent. Take the high spot and tighten the spokes on the opposite side a quarter of a turn. You'll only be working with a couple of spokes. Loosen the ones on the high side a similar amount. Work slowly and carefully, be patient. Very small changes are what you're looking for.
    Keep running the wheel around and working on the high spot and eventually it'll go away.
    If there's more than one; as happens frequently, I take the "average" of the whole wheel. If say 2/3s of it is true and 1/3 a bit out, work on the third that's out.

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