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  1. #1
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    Just got my first bike after so many years, but I have a concern...

    So I started riding for a few days after getting my bike (a trek 520), and I noticed that, when I'm coasting, I tend to support myself with my legs on the pedals instead of just sitting on the saddle. Do most people do this or is this indicative of some other problem?

    I have a new brooks b17, which is comfortable, but if I just sit i feel like I'm hurting some bones or something. I first started supporting my weight on the pedals as a way to cushion the shock of going over rough roads or going off sidewalks, but now it seems like i do it unconsciously as i coast, and so I can feel my legs getting tired and tense unless I relax and try to sit, but just hurts a bit as i mentioned. Maybe I just need to get used to it?

  2. #2
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Putting your weight on the pedals rather than the saddle while coasting or going over rough roads is good.

  3. #3
    Senior Member MNBikeCommuter's Avatar
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    The Brooks saddle will also most likely "break in" and become more comfortable with time/miles, lessening or eliminating the current discomfort.

  4. #4
    Sophomoric Member Roody's Avatar
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    Your problems are probably due to inexperience, but it would be a good idea to have the bike rechecked for fit. I think you will do well in cycling because you have a good awareness of your body and your bike and the relation between them.


    "Think Outside the Cage"

  5. #5
    Crispy Member ahsposo's Avatar
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    I agree with Machka. What you are doing is absolutely correct.

    That said the other responses are valid also.

    With a well fitting bike all of your contact points (butt, hands, feet) share some of the burden. The distribution of weight may move around as you ride and surface inclination and condition change.

  6. #6
    Crispy Member ahsposo's Avatar
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    Oh, and enjoy your new bike. Get out and ride.

  7. #7
    6 miles per taco, w00t! HappyStuffing's Avatar
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    I believe that your weight is suppose to be distrubted to your hands/feet/butt more or less evenly if setup properly. Of course, as you ride, you may want to lean forward more aggressively or when you are coasting you might just want to sit and have a break and your weight distribution will change accordingly. All normal.

    Most people stand up or at least put lots of weight on the feet when going over something bumpy - it saves the two boy's down there

  8. #8
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    A Brooks saddle can take a long time to acclimatise to your Butt---Or Vice-versa. Whether it is brooks or not- you will find that it is a good idea to take the weight off the saddle ocasionally. Saves a lot of pain on a long ride and also rests the leg muscles a bit.

    On the road bike I have taken a lot of care to make certain that the saddle is comfortable. Took time to set the saddle up properly and money to eventually find the saddle that suits my butt. I don't rest the butt often till over 50 miles but downhill and pedals level and just take the weight off. It helps. But the mountain bike is the complete oposite. I spend more time off the saddle over rough ground and even uphill it is out of the saddle most of the way. The saddle is only really used to sit on when on the road to the hills or on the way back. The rest of the time it is only used to perch on occasionally.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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