Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-16-11, 06:26 PM   #1
trey.a
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A new guy question, from me.

The plastic piece on the rear wheel, behind the cassette, what is the purpose of that? I honestly don't know.
trey.a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-11, 06:29 PM   #2
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Bikes: Rans Rockst (Retro rocket) Rans Enduro Sport (Retro racket) Catrike 559, Merin Bear Valley (beater bike).
Posts: 26,396
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
If you ever accidentally overshift the cassette, your chain will bugger up the spokes on the outside of the hub flange faster than it has taken me to type this. That plastic disc is a spoke protector and is supposed to keep that from happening.
Retro Grouch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-11, 06:31 PM   #3
wahoonc
Senior Member
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
Posts: 16,687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also called a dork disc. But it is to protect the spokes in case of a maladjusted derailleur or an over shift.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-11, 06:32 PM   #4
trey.a
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
well, I learned something. Thanks!
trey.a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-11, 11:23 PM   #5
A10K
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Bikes: Unidentifiable CX-based franken-commuter
Posts: 172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Was riding a dumpster-found mountain-bike-shaped-object yesterday, one that I had already serviced/cleaned/inspected/test ridden (hard, I might add), and heard a strange grinding coming from my rear derailleur. I looked down and saw that the chain seemed to have jammed between the plate of the derailleur cage and jockey pulley... well, me being with a friend at the time and only about two blocks from my house, I kept pedalling hoping it would jump back on. After a few strokes I heard the unmistakable sound of something grinding against spokes, yelled out and expletive to my partner and coasted to a stop at the bottom of the hill. The jockey pulley was missing, the plates misaligned, and the chain had managed to jump from the middle of the cassette to the inside, wedging itself between the "pie plate" and the largest cog. Seems the derailleur cage was what was smacking against my spokes, but the spoke guard managed to keep the chain from tangling in the rear wheel.

If I cared about keeping the bike, the pie plate saved a lot of potential damage to the spokes. Then again, if I cared about keeping the bike, I would not have picked one up with a Tourney derailleur. At least whoever at the local bike co-op gets the un-enviable job of replacing the RD won't have to worry about replacing spokes (given how often I'm there it'll probably be me in any case).
A10K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-11, 10:37 AM   #6
Looigi
Senior Member
 
Looigi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 8,943
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a Fred indicator and indicates to other riders this rider is a Fred. If you don't know what a Fred is, you need to HTFU.

A couple of months ago I got tangled up with another rider and we went down. Unbeknownst to be, my RD hanger got bent. A bit later the bent hanger caused me to overshift and drop the chain past the large cog into the spokes of the rear wheel, one of which subsequently broke. The hanger is now straightened and all the drive side spokes replaced. A dork disk would have prevented the spokes from getting damaged. Unfortunately I'm not a Fred so can't run one, otherwise I would.
Looigi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-11, 11:56 AM   #7
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,086
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I hate breaking 25% of my spokes all at once like that.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:28 AM.