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Old 08-18-11, 10:21 PM   #1
ktwbear
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Is my cannondale r600 cad 3 slow compared to todays new bikes

New to the forum

trying to figure out how much speed i will pick up if
I buy a new bike. I am riding a Cannondae R600 cad3 stock.
I am 50 years old and ride on avarge 75 mi per week at a 3.25 min.mi pace...avg
relatively flat So. Fl terrain...but wind blows 15 to 20 mph consistently...so usually half the ride is into the wind. If im riding an avg 16 mph over 25 miles...what can i expect to pick up (in speed) with one of the new bikes...alum or cf

....Thanks in advance
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Old 08-18-11, 10:29 PM   #2
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I doubt that a "new" bike will allow you to go faster unless it's radically different. How fast you are is determined by your fitness and the amount of aerodynamic drag on you. Unless you train to improve your fitness or adopt a lower-drag position, you won't go faster.
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Old 08-18-11, 10:42 PM   #3
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Thanks for the quick reply. Good to know...i am suprised that over 10 years has gone passed and improvement in bike tech offers no tangible advancement ...so what has changed?...is it all a comfort thing?
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Old 08-18-11, 10:46 PM   #4
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It's not the bike! That CAD3 can handle a whole lot more than you are dishing out.

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Old 08-19-11, 12:52 AM   #5
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There's frames that are more aero, if you're wanting to throw money around ya could get one.
Might save a few seconds on a day's riding.
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Old 08-19-11, 01:32 AM   #6
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A bike can neither be slow or fast.

A rider on a bike can be either fast or slow.

Wanna be faster on your old bike? Get get ceramic bearing bottom bracket and a ceramic bearing hub wheelset. Get low rolling resistance tires. Pump tires to max for your weight. Haul @ss!

Basically you're reducing rolling resistance and get slightly faster on the same bike. No need to drop cash on a new bike. But buying a new bike is always good.
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Old 08-19-11, 06:39 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktwbear View Post
New to the forum

trying to figure out how much speed i will pick up if
I buy a new bike. I am riding a Cannondae R600 cad3 stock.
I am 50 years old and ride on avarge 75 mi per week at a 3.25 min.mi pace...avg
relatively flat So. Fl terrain...but wind blows 15 to 20 mph consistently...so usually half the ride is into the wind. If im riding an avg 16 mph over 25 miles...what can i expect to pick up (in speed) with one of the new bikes...alum or cf

....Thanks in advance
Do you ride in the drops or on the hoods?
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Old 08-19-11, 07:37 AM   #8
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I don't get this aero bike thing. Sure it might make a difference compared to another bike.............in a wind tunnel.......without a rider. Throw a rider on the bike and what is gained?

Last edited by bigbadwullf; 08-19-11 at 07:58 AM.
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Old 08-19-11, 01:32 PM   #9
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My old Bianchi is unbelievably slow when no one's on it.
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Old 08-19-11, 03:56 PM   #10
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+1 to the first answer. A more expensive bike can add more aero accents - if you're already riding a road bike in a tucked position though, it's in the realm of diminishing returns.
A more expensive bike can cut a small amount of weight. If you are 150 pounds, then instead of plugging 172 pounds into the force and mass equation you can plug 170 pounds into it instead. not a large improvement. If you are racing and you have to worry about shaving seconds off of a fifty mile course, both of these will be very noticable, but for most people it won't be huge.
You can cut some resistance with tires and bearings. Tires is probably the big one if you have something like knobbies. If you have high pressure tires with some sort of smoothish tread inflated properly, not too much more to be done to tires. That leaves bearings, which is a small energy drag compared to aero and once again, law of diminishing returns applies here.
If there are low hanging fruit on any of these by all means address it. But you won't see any large gains from anything you do within the basic model of "road bike" speedwise from equipment upgrades. It might -feel- a bit zingier, due to slightly better acceleration I suppose.
If you want a dramatic increase in speed, you're going to have to do something drastic in the aero department, such as a recumbent racer of some sort. Otherwise, you're just going to need to beef up the engine.
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Old 08-19-11, 03:57 PM   #11
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The best way to get faster is drop some weight and/or get stronger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ktwbear View Post
I am 50 years old and ride on avarge 75 mi per week at a 3.25 min.mi pace...avg
Not sure if I understand what you're saying here. Average speed is usually shown in mph or km/h.

Ask the folks in the 50+ forum. They have all the right answers.
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Last edited by RonH; 08-19-11 at 04:00 PM.
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Old 08-19-11, 04:05 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktwbear View Post
New to the forum

trying to figure out how much speed i will pick up if
I buy a new bike. I am riding a Cannondae R600 cad3 stock.
I am 50 years old and ride on avarge 75 mi per week at a 3.25 min.mi pace...avg
relatively flat So. Fl terrain...but wind blows 15 to 20 mph consistently...so usually half the ride is into the wind. If im riding an avg 16 mph over 25 miles...what can i expect to pick up (in speed) with one of the new bikes...alum or cf

....Thanks in advance
This mini mi?


Oh...ah, wait...nevermind

Placebo effect will make you go faster. Just get a new bike...don't rationalize. Just do it, a nice new bike is always nice!
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Old 08-19-11, 04:29 PM   #13
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Velomobile ! its a combination of a tadpole recumbent trike,
and a Bonneville Land speed record racer..

or a very low profile 2 wheel recumbent, that is what the IHPVA folks run.
Streamline one of those .*and see if you can top the 80mph flying mile that is the current record.
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Old 08-20-11, 12:15 AM   #14
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I don't have a computer & don't want to know how fast (slow) I go. Based on riding my several bikes, I have noticed some are faster & some slower.
Firstly, everything must be well tuned and oiled.
Tires should be smooth, moderate width and pressure; not too fat and soft, but also not too narrow and stiff if you ride on rough roads. They should be wide enough that you can stay seated putting out power most of the time, with less hopping over and swerving around bumps.
Exact fit is very important for speed. I am still discovering the subtleties of this one. Huge gain to ride in the drops; aerodynamics rule! A fast position is not necessarily a most comfortable position.
The Cannondales are pretty stiff & not too heavy. I don't think that's the problem.
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Old 08-20-11, 01:24 AM   #15
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Older Aluminium Cannondales have a reputation for giving a harsh ride but unlkess you are riding rough roads then I doubt you would notice it. In fact a stiff frame (With the stiffness in the right place) can add to the efficiency of the ride.

But in 10 years- a lot of development has gone on. Better Drivetrain- better tyres and and wheels and to some extent- better frame design. But the biggest improvement will come from the Engine. Don't know how long you have been riding- or since you re-started- but Get the bike fitness before you start thinking about new bikes. A New bike would give you all the new technology and look nice and shiny- but would not make you any faster.

And visit the 50+ forum. Plenty of advice over there that will put you on the right track.
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Old 08-20-11, 07:32 AM   #16
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ktwbear, I've rode Cannondale road bikes for two decades, just so you know my view is prejudiced. There's been an evolution in road bikes since the CAAD3, but primarily in aerodynamics which will have little to no advantage for a recreational cyclist. The CAAD3 is a fine frame that can be enhanced with more modern bits and bobs. A lighter wheelset and a personalized rear cassette can be inexpensive modifications to perk up the performance of any road bike. Riding in the drops and/or an aerobar can help to deal with the wind.

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Old 08-20-11, 09:59 AM   #17
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Right. It's still just a function of power generated by your muscles vs resistance. Bicycles have very little resistance, always have. Newer bikes have added a whole zero onto the zero point zero zero blah resistance they have. A big chunk of the resistance is the force needed to displace air around you, the rider, while on the bike. Therefore, there just are no huge gains to be made just by modernizing your equipment, so long as you keep your old bike in shape. The only way you'll get a big speed boost from an equipment change is, as mentioned, going to involve aero racing recumbent bicycles that do really drastic things to help aero.
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Old 08-20-11, 11:36 AM   #18
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The difference between a full-on "aero" time-trial bike and an ordinary roadster amounts to only seconds over a typical time-trial course. When the rider goes the full route, with skin-suit, aero helmet, booties.... a few seconds more.
Pro racers spend hours in wind-tunnels perfecting the most-aerodynamic position to maintain; just as do downhill skiers.

For normal humans on a pleasant ride... Scarcely any difference at all. Swapping out your well-adjusted steel bearings for a set of ceramics.... May up your coolness factor but I can't imagine much if any benefit.
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Old 08-21-11, 11:12 AM   #19
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Hahah good one .....3.25 minutes per mile....pace.....if i go faster my pace will improve....like maybe i have a few 3 min miles.....
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Old 08-21-11, 11:44 AM   #20
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I still see criterium racers in the CAT4/5 races using old CAAD 3 and 4 frames. Nothing slow about that bike at all. If anything those frames are too stiff and harsh riding for casual riders because they were designed for criterium racing.
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Old 08-21-11, 02:36 PM   #21
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I still see criterium racers in the CAT4/5 races using old CAAD 3 and 4 frames. Nothing slow about that bike at all. If anything those frames are too stiff and harsh riding for casual riders because they were designed for criterium racing.
This is kinda the point that I've been waiting for someone to make. Over a longer-ish ride, a newer bike may be faster; not because of any real aerodynamic advantage from hydroforming the tubes, but because those older R600 frames beat the crap out of you. I road one briefly when I was first "trying out" road riding and it almost turned me off of road bikes entirely. Where modern hydro forming pays dividends is in the ability to "tune" the different parts of the frame to take away some of the harsh-ridingness of aluminum alloy frames. This can make you effectively stronger (faster) at mile fifty+. I think, anyway.
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Old 08-22-11, 11:47 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commo_soulja View Post
A bike can neither be slow or fast.

A rider on a bike can be either fast or slow.

Wanna be faster on your old bike? Get get ceramic bearing bottom bracket and a ceramic bearing hub wheelset. Get low rolling resistance tires. Pump tires to max for your weight. Haul @ss!

Basically you're reducing rolling resistance and get slightly faster on the same bike. No need to drop cash on a new bike. But buying a new bike is always good.
The placebo effect ?
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Old 08-22-11, 12:28 PM   #23
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Most people buying a new bike for the first time in 10+ years ride faster but that's due to feeling good about the new purchase and wanting to justify the cost. So you ride harder and longer because it looks and feels better. Compared to a CAD 3, a newer CF bike will feel more comfortable and may actually help you recover more after really hard rides. CAD 3's are known for the stiffness, which is great for sprinting but can be a little rough after a while. The wheels will be a little faster as well, especially if you go with aero ones.
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Old 08-22-11, 02:10 PM   #24
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. This can make you effectively stronger (faster) at mile fifty+. I think, anyway.
Not true! I have a 1998 CAD3 and a 2007 Lemond Chambery (3/5 carbon). About 35 centuries, about half on the CAD3 and no, it is not slower after mile 50. And certainly not if you are talking about a century with lots of climbing.
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Old 08-24-11, 08:50 AM   #25
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well.... I've been riding a 1999 R800 CAAD 3 for 3 years, just replaced it with a 2006 Al Synapse. I've gained .2/mph in my weekly average and a little comfort on rough roads. The increase may just be the new bike feel, or attributable to the slightly softer ride. I'm happy with my purchase, but the real difference is not large. I did this to gain a little more comfort on longer rides, 75-100 miles.

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