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Old 09-08-11, 02:58 PM   #1
ScottieDog
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AeroBars on Hybrid

Would it be completely outrageous putting AeroBars onto a Felt QX85 Hybrid ?

Granted it would be unusual lol But, would it be ridiculous ?

I think itīs actual reasonable as there are plenty of very straight stretches where I ride, and I want to be able to vary hand positioning which as we all know, isnīt too easy on a flat bar.

Gonna put Bar Ends on too, for another position..
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Old 09-08-11, 03:04 PM   #2
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Maybe some ape hangers would be good too

If that is what you want, I see no problem with it.
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Old 09-08-11, 03:12 PM   #3
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Whatever floats your boat. if you need the extra hand positions, go for it.

And tell your friends that you're *really* doing to to get the parts for a real TT bike past your wife.
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Old 09-08-11, 10:00 PM   #4
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I think itīs actual reasonable as there are plenty of very straight stretches where I ride, and I want to be able to vary hand positioning which as we all know, isnīt too easy on a flat bar.
Aero bars are really nice for giving your hands a break. They help a lot in a strong headwind too.

As long as you can adjust them to a reasonably ergonomic position, and your steering doesn't get twitchy for some reason, I don't see why not.
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Old 09-08-11, 10:04 PM   #5
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agreed, it is only called innovation to use something outside of its original intention. I use a nice pair from craigslist, not because I am trying to go faster, but because I want to rest my hands on longer trips.
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Old 09-08-11, 10:09 PM   #6
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I myself would not use them unless racing TT's, not even on my road bike. But I know a few who do, including hybrids and mtn bikes.
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Old 09-08-11, 10:38 PM   #7
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I had them on a MTB.

Use what works.

Haters gonna hate

(yeah.. I said it... wanna fight about it?)
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Old 09-08-11, 11:01 PM   #8
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I myself would not use them unless racing TT's, not even on my road bike. . . .
Not trying to start an argument but, why not?
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Old 09-09-11, 02:53 AM   #9
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Plenty of German long distance tourists use aerobars with their flat-bar MTB touring bikes.
In the windier parts of Netherlands, even 3-speed, step-thru granny bikes are fitted with them.
You can use them to get aerodynamic and to provide some comfortable alternate positions. You dont need to have them very low down like a TT bike.
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Old 09-09-11, 06:34 AM   #10
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When I went in for my fitting, they were running a little late finishing up the guy ahead of me. He had a pair on his bike - a Surly Big Dummy! It was one of the weirdest things I've ever seen.
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Old 09-09-11, 06:36 AM   #11
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Iīm liking the idea more and more. lol.
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Old 09-09-11, 07:12 AM   #12
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ScottieDog, I've used aerobars on my roadies for years and I am contemplating moving a set to the touring bike. There are both advantages and disadvantages with using aero bars. The advantages are you become more areodynamic and for me the main advantage is an alternate hand position. The disadvantages are that rider fitment can be a PIA with some bikes, brake levers may not be immediately accessed and you really shouldn't use them if there are othere riders or pedestrians in the area because there is a loss of fine contol using just your shoulders and elbows.

For the recreational rider I find the Profile Airstryke a good design as the pads don't block any of the tops when not in use.

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Old 09-09-11, 07:28 AM   #13
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Thanks Brad, good feedback :-) Exactly the reasons I was contemplating them for. I would be sure not to use them where there are pedestrians or congestion though. I ride a lot in the country roads of Spain, a few runs in particular where there is pretty much nothing and it is almost deserted, very straight in places and the extra hand positions for those straights will be welcomed. At least going to give it a try anyway, can soon take them off again.

Like the look of those Profile Airstrike. I was looking at these here..... PZ Racing TT3

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Old 09-09-11, 07:32 AM   #14
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One thing I will say is that I am a little bit concerned about them slipping down, I suppose they come with very good clamps, but still.... Someone said some locktite will help that.
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Old 09-09-11, 08:46 AM   #15
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Not trying to start an argument but, why not?
It's the appearance thing. Some people just don't like aero bar people(and sometimes they are right in that judgement) but if that is what you want I'd do it. To heck with the .....dislike this term......"haters".
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Old 09-09-11, 08:56 AM   #16
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Thanks everyone.

Yeh, well the appearance doesnīt really bother me to be honest, I want to be comfortable and thats it really. Iīm sure the sheep and goats wonīt mind too much, and thatīs about all the life I see on my routes anyway. ha - The Sheep/Goat Herder already thinks I am some form of lunatic anyway, heīs never seen a bike before I donīt think.

Cheers. Great feedback. Thanks to all. (Still a bit worried about the "slipping down problem", any one any advice on this side of it - reference post 14).
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Old 09-09-11, 09:53 AM   #17
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My long 12 mile rural commute rig: tall stem , close reach , aero bars, and a Zzipper 'thriller' fairing.

because of the fairing, I didn't need to crouch over, low.

in a trade I got one of profile's earlier products, a single tube bent to be both the bull-horn-bars,
and the aero-bar, in a single piece..

Worked well, the fairing made it easier to hear the books on tape
cassette tapes I got from the Public Library..
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Old 09-09-11, 10:09 AM   #18
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i've got a pair of profile design aerobars laying around. they're the $200 carbon ones. they're barely used so i've thought about possibly trying to get some money out of them via ebay, but i've also entertained the idea of slapping them on my hybrid commuter to help get out of the wind on the more blustery days. the reasons i haven't done so are:

A - i think they'd interfere with my bar-mounted headlight

B - i can't help but be a little hesitant about the dubious aesthetics of aerobars on a hybrid commuter bike.
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Old 09-09-11, 10:34 AM   #19
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Have you considered wide randonneur bars?
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Old 09-09-11, 10:36 AM   #20
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Not trying to start an argument but, why not?


1) what for?
2) why would I want the extra weight?
3) we do plenty of climbing and aerobars and no advantages climbing in the mountains.
4) my bike is set up so that it is comfortable, 35 centuries under my belt, I don't feel that I need extra hand, elbow positions.
5) I ride with other riders so brake access is a plus. Going from bars to brakes lacks response time.
6) I do fast descents on mountain road switchback, aerobars have no use on this terrain.
7) riding into the wind, I find enough power by going down in the drops and maintaining a higher cadence.

Not saying they aren't right for others. Like maybe a double century rider etc. I myself don't have a need for them.
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Old 09-09-11, 11:19 AM   #21
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"Slipping down". Do you mean slipping forward? If so, maybe your seat is tilted down in front....very common.
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Old 09-09-11, 11:43 AM   #22
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ScottieDog, The majority of the weight is on the pads. They don't have to be clamped gorilla tight to stay in place in my experiance. Just make sure the gap between the the upper and lower clamp is even front to rear.

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Old 09-09-11, 12:01 PM   #23
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Have road and MTB's and Ride road with both. The road bike offers enough riding positions to get comfortable and aerodynamic so no need for any extra positions I would not use. The mtb has bar ends and I can get comfortable on that but aerodynamics is a problem. many times on the long straight stretshes of road I wanted to get low down out of the wind and can't. Aerobars may work on that but a couple of problems will arise.

First of all- the stability with your hands so close together takes some getting used to.

And secondly- unless you have the bars way down below the saddle- When you get onto the aerobars you will not feel a great deal of aerodynamic benefit. That position will take some getting used to so think about how supple your body is to be able to ride with your head between your knees when on the main bars.
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Old 09-09-11, 09:20 PM   #24
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I find that aero bars are a generational thing. I'm 30, and nobody that I ride with in my age group would consider them. However, those who grew up with the sport in the LeMond era are all about them, and tout their benefits. Honestly though, if you like them, do it. If not, don't. The bar-ends you speak of should do plenty for your hand position concerns.
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Old 09-09-11, 09:51 PM   #25
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1) what for?
My ride today was 25 miles, doing unexpected errands. This is after my run, and I was pretty tired before the run. And there was a 15- to 20-mph north wind on a route that goes mostly north-south. On the hoods I was doing like 14 mph. On the drops it was something like 16 mph. On the aero bars I would do 17 or 18 mph.

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2) why would I want the extra weight?
If you are racing or something, the weight of clipons might be significant. But we're not talking about racing bikes here. We're talking about your basic grocery-getter/commuter/errand runner. Something you use to carry things. The stuff you carry weighs far more than the aero bars.

One of my old road bikes has a rear basket on the rack and clip-on aero bars. Fenders even. It weighs over 30 lbs and I usually carry at least 15 lbs in the basket.

So, the extra weight is insignificant for this type of riding. What you get for the weight is more speed and a way to give your hands a rest.

Quote:
3) we do plenty of climbing and aerobars and no advantages climbing in the mountains.
Aero bars don't work as kickstands either.

Quote:
4) my bike is set up so that it is comfortable, 35 centuries under my belt, I don't feel that I need extra hand, elbow positions.
I can't do that. After about 40 or 50 miles I find it nice to give my hands a break, even just for a minute or two.

Quote:
5) I ride with other riders so brake access is a plus. Going from bars to brakes lacks response time.
6) I do fast descents on mountain road switchback, aerobars have no use on this terrain.
It's that kickstand thing: aero bars are not for that. Judging equipment against things it isn't intended for is kind of silly, don't you think?

Quote:
7) riding into the wind, I find enough power by going down in the drops and maintaining a higher cadence.
I get at least 1 or 2 mph more speed on my aero bars compared to drops. More headwind means more speed gain. For me it is more comfortable too - I can stay on aero bars for hours whereas being on the drops takes more effort.

But, it's a body geometry thing. For some people aero bars bring to mind mysery. Back pain, saddle discomfort, whatever.

A lot of that can be alleviated by a higher bar position. Here is someone with a high aero bar position riding the RAAM race in 2010.



Interesting trivia: anyone know what that scaffolding is on the rider's back? Hint: A guy named Shermer first encountered the problem it fixes.

P.S. Here is a better picture of higher aero bars in use (source):


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