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  1. #1
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    Recycling Steel and Aluminum Saves

    Mining iron ore to make steel, and mining bauxite, to make aluminum, are both very expensive processes. Of course the bayer process involved in the process of reducing bauxite ore into aluminum is a very expensive process. More expensive than the process of reducing iron ore into steel. Both processes require enormous amounts of energy to produce their prospective raw materials.

    By recycling steel, almost 75% of the energy used to convert iron ore into steel can be saved through recycling. That's enough energy to power eighteen million homes annually. At least 25% of all steel contains recycled steel. That means, that any bicycle made of steel is comprised of at least 25% of its ancestral material. Steel is 100% recyclable. That means, that though there is only a finite amount of the iron element within the earth, we don't ever have to fear running out of iron, or its alloy steel, because we can recycle it forever.

    Aluminum, is also a finite element found in nature. It is exceedingly abundant, making up about 8% of the earth's crust. Though aluminum's extraction from the earth and its processing is cost prohibitive, the recycling of aluminum is much easier than that of steel. The recycling of aluminum has an energy savings of just about 95%. That means that, very little aluminum has to be mined in order for aluminum to remain in circulation. It is present as a constant raw material source via recycling. This fact saves manufacturers who utilize aluminum in the production of their products, hundreds of thousands of dollars, per month.

    Watch how at least 25% of every steel bicycle you're ever going to see, is processed prior to manufacturing, via these videos:

    http://videos.howstuffworks.com/scie...teel-video.htm
    Steel

    http://videos.howstuffworks.com/disc...teel-video.htm
    Steel

    Recycling steel saves the nonrenewable element iron, it saves energy, and it saves the money that our nation so desperately needs to remain strong.

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOpGhAdQFEY
    Aluminum

    Also watch how almost 95% of the aluminum bicycles your ever going see, are processed prior to manufacturing, via the above video.


    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 10-05-11 at 12:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    I worked in both steel and aluminum production facilities. Recycling is the way to go. I love finding aluminum BSO's on the side of the road...frames are worth about $15 at the recyclers. Several aluminum primary metals plants in the US have been shut down in the past 20 years due to energy costs.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  3. #3
    Blissketeer HokuLoa's Avatar
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    +1 Slim. It pains me when I do the bi-annual "free dump day" and see folks putting bikes and other easily recycled materials into the landfill. Especially in my area since anyone can recycle metal waste year round for free at the local waste facilities. Hell, some of these folks could even get some bucks for the metal and frankly they often look as if they could use the money. Pure ignorance about recycling possibilities. Lots of (most?) Americans are well indoctrinated in the consumables recycling at the curb but amazingly they never translate that to other larger, more important recyclable products.

    ::::sigh::::

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    I donít think I have lived in a community in Southern California in the last 20 years that didnít have a recycling program. When you take the trash can to the curb you also take the recycling can and, in some places, the green waste. White metal and hazardous waste like paint and electronics are more of a problem. However if a bike will not fit in the can that is a different problem. Because people tend to not want to remove tires, rubber parts and saddle they toss the whole thing in the dumpster.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mobile 155 View Post
    I don’t think I have lived in a community in Southern California in the last 20 years that didn’t have a recycling program. When you take the trash can to the curb you also take the recycling can and, in some places, the green waste. White metal and hazardous waste like paint and electronics are more of a problem. However if a bike will not fit in the can that is a different problem. Because people tend to not want to remove tires, rubber parts and saddle they toss the whole thing in the dumpster.
    Hey Mobile! Watch the video! They have an answer for that problem...

    - Slim

  6. #6
    Fat Guy Rolling dcrowell's Avatar
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    I wonder if my daughter's stolen bike was "recycled".
    Car-Free IT Geek
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcrowell View Post
    I wonder if my daughter's stolen bike was "recycled".
    Hi there Dcrowell!

    If the ancestral gods of metal have their way, she will get at least a portion of it right back when she gets another one!

    Now isn't that a refreshing thought?

    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 10-05-11 at 12:15 PM.

  8. #8
    Fat Guy Rolling dcrowell's Avatar
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    Bicycle reincarnation?

    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Hi there Dcrowell!

    If the ancestral gods of metal have their way, she get at least a portion of it right back when she gets another one!

    Now isn't that a refreshing thought?

    - Slim
    Car-Free IT Geek
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcrowell View Post
    Bicycle reincarnation?
    Yes!

    Of course, with varying portions of elemental metals, black soot, and fire, the ancestral gods come alive and relinquish fiery liquids containing many spawns of future generations.

    You will soon find that when world cyclists join together, meditate, and chant the ancestral mantras from the ancient age of iron, the new generation then becomes endowed with improved cycling properties than that of their forefathers.


    We therefore, not only have Bicycle Reincarnation, but Bicycle Evolution, as well!


    - Slim
    Last edited by SlimRider; 10-05-11 at 03:03 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Flying Merkel's Avatar
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    In my neighborhood, we have the pickadors that drive through the alleys looking for stuff. Many residents put their metal waste or "interesting" trash next to the dumpster. The last bike I found was a crap Schwinn MTB. Not worth doing a fix-n-flip. Stripped it down into components parts and fasteners, dumped the frame in the alley where it disappeared shortly. These guys are the front line of the environmental movement.

    Re-use is better than recycling but more labor-intensive. A lot of junk cars still have parts on them that have value. Getting them to the right hands is the trick.

    Once tore down an aluminum patio cover. Took it down to the scrap yard and got $40.00 cash. That was about a week's worth of groceries and beer that I almost threw away.

  11. #11
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    What we should always remember is that, extracting aluminum from its ore "bauxite", cost much more than extracting iron from its ore. However, recycling aluminum from already existing aluminum, is much cheaper than recycling iron from already existing iron, or steel, its alloy.

    - Slim

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