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  1. #1
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    Crafty patterns for cyclists?

    Hello everyone.

    I'm a sort of crafty person, but currently poor. Of course, not being able to act on my inspirations is somewhat frustrating. I've been looking longingly at Simplicity patterns, as it is a goal of mine to make my own clothes that actually fit, and there are some really neat fabrics out there.

    In my ponderings, I actually took advantage of a sale plus coupons to get ribbon for streamers and a really cute fabric that I want to use to make a handlebar bag- all for super cheap. Today's visit to the bike shop made me think of all the clothing that was there, and bags- or I guess panniers.

    My questions is: if I made my own bike accessories- panniers, jackets, whatever- would other cyclists be interested in patterns for things like that? I realize most of you out there who even consider stepping into a bike shop over Walmart aren't as poor as me, and that probably only crafty people would even read this thread. Still, it's worth asking I think.

    Also, if you would like patterns shared, what sort of features do you like for certain things. Such as- I want my handlebag to have a place just for my cable lock so it stays easy to get to. Vents in a jacket or pockets, longer backs like I see in some designs- all these are interesting and serve some purpose, so I'd like to know what you would like to see that maybe you don't already.

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Green Pepper in Eugene OR, had cycle stuff in their sewing pattern catalog.

    Not Sure if the company is still going.

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    Handlebar bags with a couple of side pockets would be nice. Sort of small so they didn't need an elaborate mounting system. Canvas or maybe denim? A matching saddlebag. For jackets, a high collar, double front zip, 3 rear pockets with the side ones open and the center zipped. Sleeves with cuffs that open and close. Post pics!

  4. #4
    Snakes on a bike Antaresia's Avatar
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    http://www.etsy.com/search/handmade?...ery&ship_to=US

    Lots of ideas there, looks like there's a market.

    Personally, I've gone the DIY rout with stuff from second hand shops and army surplus.

  5. #5
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    My wife made a nice handlebar bag several decades ago. Can't recall where the pattern came from.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  6. #6
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    Double front zip... Shelbyfv I'm afraid I'm too much of a newbie to understand some of what you're requesting. What is a double front zipper? It has flaps on both sides to keep water from leaking through it?
    EDIT: Nevermind, I found a two-way separating zipper on Green Peppers pdf flier. Pretty sure That is it.

    I'd love a small sketch or explanation of where the rear pockets should be.

    Should the cuffs be elastic with a snap closure, without elastic at all and just snug if snapped, or is something else preferred? I have found that more air up my arms would be a very good thing when I get too hot (because I still haven't figured out how little clothing to use for cold mornings).

    For a handlebar bag, I had planned on very simple attachment- this wouldn't be where you stash your debit cards or anything. I'm going to tie mine on with leftover pretty ribbon, but I figure most people would enjoy a velcro-type strap.

    Green Pepper looks awesome! I'll poke around there some more, thanks
    EDIT: "SQUEEEE!!!
    Last edited by redeyedtreefr0g; 10-13-11 at 10:04 PM.

  7. #7
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    Fietsbob... wow!
    Green Pepper is SO awesome! They have everything... even dog coats! And I can get reflective tape from them! I cannot believe I have not come to Oregon sooner. All the cool things come from over here, and now I live here! Yay me!

  8. #8
    Must... ride... more... Phil_gretz's Avatar
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    Functionality and Durability

    Two important words to cyclists. We're all pretty hard core here. We have all been frustrated with cycling items that didn't hold up under the demands of regular use, in foul conditions, with grime and grease, and in the cold or heat. Everything must be built to withstand rigorous use, use with one hand while riding, and exposure to sunlight and water. Salt and chemicals in the winter, too.

    Keep this in mind as you develop prototypes. Test, test, test...

    I don't speak for everyone, I understand, but few of us really care how something looks. We care that something works and will keep working.

    Good luck,
    Phil G.

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    Zipper that opens from both top and bottom. Pockets on back of jacket like on a regular bike jersey. If the jacket has an extended tail, the pockets could be a little higher up so the contents rest on the small of the back rather than the butt. Velcro for cuffs.

  10. #10
    Must... ride... more... Phil_gretz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
    Zipper that opens from both top and bottom. Pockets on back of jacket like on a regular bike jersey. If the jacket has an extended tail, the pockets could be a little higher up so the contents rest on the small of the back rather than the butt. Velcro for cuffs.
    Good points, especially about a slightly higher rear pocket and definitely velcro cuff closure.

  11. #11
    Goodbye Leeroy Jenkins tagaproject6's Avatar
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    No hook and loop fasteners for me. Those things do not get along well with spandex.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    TOML

    _________________________________________________________________________

    Wilier Izoard XP (Campagnolo Record)
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  12. #12
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    Here's a different take.

    There is definitely a shortage of recumbent-oriented jerseys. That is, jerseys with pockets on the side/front rather than on the back (as recumbent cyclists lie against a a seat back rendering "normal" cycling jersey back pockets unusable/uncomfortable).
    -----------------------------------------
    While others have labelled me antisocial at various times, it's actually not true. I just don't like people.

  13. #13
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    I keep meaning to DIY some stuff myself, but never get around to it. Here are some things I've thought about though, in case it helps. I'd totally be into patterns.
    Shoe covers- not necessarily über-waterproof ones, just something that goes over the front of my sneakers to keep them from getting soaked. Was thinking duct tape for this one, maybe
    Panniers- waterproof (covered zipper, seamgrip for sealing seams). Would like them to have the side closest to pedals tapered back for better heel clearance, also would like them to be of cuter fabric (thus, the DIY)
    Pants- I'm sure a standard pants pattern exists that would work with waterproof fabric, though. I'm having trouble finding any that fit (rise too high, length too long).

  14. #14
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    All of these things seem very doable, especially is I can get fabric from places like Green Pepper for the more outdoorsy stuff- the rain protection and such.

    As far as cutesy, I am a huge fan of expressing yourself in whatever manner you like, whether that happens to be cute multicolored streamers and eventually bags to match (raises hand), or anything else.

    I also HATE velcro, and that's just from doing laundry! I can't imagine having to work around the stuff with delicate fabric purposely involved. Magnets seem to be getting into everything, perhaps I can play with those. Even the ScottEVest has magnets and its made for electronic stuff, so I have little worries there. Other stuff would also close cuffs with little finger dexterity needed, so we'll see.

    Ok then, if I come up with anything really cool (or even not-so-cool) I'll be sure to share

  15. #15
    Senior Member shipwreck's Avatar
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    It gets expensive to buy all the right zippers, fabrics, snaps, webbing and such. I go to thrift stores, and look for damaged sporting goods. Stripp them of webbing, zipps, all that. Get the good zippers after you get the pattern down. A test pattern made out of cotton before investing in good fabric is a good idea. You can make your own bias tape, it takes a little time, but works. Also, if you can get ahold of a worn out jacket that you like and fits, deconstruct it for a pattern, and modify that. Thats what I did with a pair of ex officio pants I liked and wore out. Added an extra strong gusset to the crotch and did not set a zipper, just a draw string. But thats because I am making things for ultra light use. Good idea to be using light upolstery thread for strength instead of cotton thread in the final item. My machines are just old heavy things that will go thru ten to sixteen layers of fabric, thru french seams and heavy webbing. Most new machines dont have the punch to do that.

    One thing that I am getting ready to do is simply add a longer tail to existing rubgy type jerseys. A contrasting color or just black. I have added rear pockets to long tail shirts.

  16. #16
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redeyedtreefr0g View Post
    Hello everyone.

    I'm a sort of crafty person, but currently poor. Of course, not being able to act on my inspirations is somewhat frustrating. I've been looking longingly at Simplicity patterns, as it is a goal of mine to make my own clothes that actually fit, and there are some really neat fabrics out there.

    In my ponderings, I actually took advantage of a sale plus coupons to get ribbon for streamers and a really cute fabric that I want to use to make a handlebar bag- all for super cheap. Today's visit to the bike shop made me think of all the clothing that was there, and bags- or I guess panniers.

    My questions is: if I made my own bike accessories- panniers, jackets, whatever- would other cyclists be interested in patterns for things like that? I realize most of you out there who even consider stepping into a bike shop over Walmart aren't as poor as me, and that probably only crafty people would even read this thread. Still, it's worth asking I think.

    Also, if you would like patterns shared, what sort of features do you like for certain things. Such as- I want my handlebag to have a place just for my cable lock so it stays easy to get to. Vents in a jacket or pockets, longer backs like I see in some designs- all these are interesting and serve some purpose, so I'd like to know what you would like to see that maybe you don't already.
    Perhaps you could use an How-To article with Pictures? This is how I made my Panniers, but I used recycled Coroplast- Corrugated Plastic, which was harvested the day after election day last year:

    8) The Corrugated Plastic Board all cut out, ready for Creasing and Folding:


    9) Creasing the Plastic Board- Use BOTH Hands, press hard, with the FOLD Line aligned with the Wall Corner on the back of a Closet. It takes firm , even pressure to crease the Coroplast Plastic Board (I had to use my other hand to press the camera button, this photo was taken after the crease was made):


    10) Fold the Pannier into its proper shape, and tack it with a piece of packing tape. Then drill holes, and start threading in some Nylon Zip-Ties. You may wish to substitute Pop-Rivets with washers. I prefer Zip-Ties as I can make an emergency repair on the road. If you carry a Pop-Rivet Tool on your Bicycle for emergency repairs, do your own thing:


    11) A third-hand Brake Cable Tool is useful for tightening the Zip-Ties:


    12) Left Side Pannier is done:


    13) Both Pannier Sides are done, assemblage is upside-down on the floor:


    14) Old Panniers on the Left, New Panniers on the right. The new Panniers are about twice the cubic volume, although two inches narrower overall. The old were 7 inches deep, the new are 12 inches deep. The old were 14 inches long, the new are 18 inches long:


    15) Test Fitting. I was inspired by TWO things- A motorcycle I saw last night, and a recent thread about a heel-clearance problem with rear panniers (here at bikeforums dot net). The SLANT allows for heel clearance, even with the panniers all the way forward on the rack:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11629987@N02/sets/72157639939606343/

  17. #17
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    Cool!

  18. #18
    Mrs. Hop-along redeyedtreefr0g's Avatar
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    How is THIS for awesome!



    Bicycles made out of beads! You can find the free instructions Here from Bead&Button magazine.

  19. #19
    Persist Indigo Mule's Avatar
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    Seattle Fabrics has a wide array of fabrics and some notions and findings that are suitable for bags and "outdoor" clothing. They tend to be reasonably priced.

  20. #20
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    I've always thought of making a bike poncho. One that fits over the entire top portion of the bike, including the rider (cyclist). However, when you dismount, you just unzip the poncho and step out. Once you're out, you zip it back up and lock it to the bike. In order to ride the bike, the poncho has to either be legally unlocked or illegally cut.

    When it's time to leave, you unlock your poncho. You step inside of the poncho and zip it back up, over your body.

    - Slim

  21. #21
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
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    NFA Vehicles Type 6 Velomobile:


    You mean like a Velomobile? I built one of those too.

    Or maybe more like the "Velotop":
    http://www.velotop.com/

    We had better remember the K.I.S.S. Rule. I made the mistake of building the "Type 6" Velomobile too narrow, with hard sides, only 20 inches wide, so the handlebars had to be cut short.
    The clear plastic was of the kind approved for replacement use in Jeep Vehicles and Convertible rear windows. (Twelve Mil Vinyl)

    But I had to scrap that vehicle, because the plywood bulkheads inside had rotted out, the roll bars were fake because they weren't welded to the frame of the bike, and like I said, it was too narrow. You need room for your (riders) elbows to bulge out.

    But sure, feel free to experiment, there are some great ideas out there.

    There is one other company that makes something similar to the NFA Vehicles Type 6, it is from Switzerland,it has an engine, and it is called an Ecomobile:

    http://www.peraves.ch/

    And my other mistake, looking back on it, was trying to create "Interchangable Parts", where the front end of the Type 6 was used as a front fairing on the Type 5. I should have cast the Type 6 Fairing (Body) in one piece, instead of rivetting it together in sections. Maybe I'll build another someday, but I might try and order one of those Velotops online first, to see how it works.

    The Type 6 was made of Kevlar, so it was very expensive.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11629987@N02/sets/72157639939606343/

  22. #22
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
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    http://www.velotop.com

    http://www.peraves.ch

    Click on the links or copy and paste above.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11629987@N02/sets/72157639939606343/

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotbike View Post
    NFA Vehicles Type 6 Velomobile:


    You mean like a Velomobile? I built one of those too.

    Or maybe more like the "Velotop":
    http://www.velotop.com/

    We had better remember the K.I.S.S. Rule. I made the mistake of building the "Type 6" Velomobile too narrow, with hard sides, only 20 inches wide, so the handlebars had to be cut short.
    The clear plastic was of the kind approved for replacement use in Jeep Vehicles and Convertible rear windows. (Twelve Mil Vinyl)

    But I had to scrap that vehicle, because the plywood bulkheads inside had rotted out, the roll bars were fake because they weren't welded to the frame of the bike, and like I said, it was too narrow. You need room for your (riders) elbows to bulge out.

    But sure, feel free to experiment, there are some great ideas out there.

    There is one other company that makes something similar to the NFA Vehicles Type 6, it is from Switzerland,it has an engine, and it is called an Ecomobile:

    http://www.peraves.ch/

    And my other mistake, looking back on it, was trying to create "Interchangable Parts", where the front end of the Type 6 was used as a front fairing on the Type 5. I should have cast the Type 6 Fairing (Body) in one piece, instead of rivetting it together in sections. Maybe I'll build another someday, but I might try and order one of those Velotops online first, to see how it works.

    The Type 6 was made of Kevlar, so it was very expensive.
    Dammmn!.... That's it!

    Hey somebody stole my idea a long time ago! ...Somehow, I feel stupidly violated!

    - Slim

    PS.

    Thanks, I guess.... < Shrugs shoulders and kicks the dirt>

  24. #24
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Dammmn!.... That's it!

    Hey somebody stole my idea a long time ago! ...Somehow, I feel stupidly violated!

    - Slim

    PS.

    Thanks, I guess.... < Shrugs shoulders and kicks the dirt>
    Yeah, well, that was built in 1989. I guess if a person could go back in time, he could "invent" things, like the steam engine or the lightbulb , before Robert Stevenson or Thomas Edison... But They would have to invent a Time Machine first! that's the only catch...

    You should do a search for "Velomobile" or "Streamlined Recumbent Bicycle". No I really didn't really invent this thing. It's just one of the few that is Upright and NOT Recumbent.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/11629987@N02/sets/72157639939606343/

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    I am going to start on a frame bag this weekend, saw one on a bike one day and decided I could do that too. Found a video on youtube and away I went. Purchased materials from www.rockywoods.com, good selection and great prices. They also have patterns for sale.

    Take a look at the DIY camping equipment and gear websites, I just used google and found about 3 days worth of interesting reading, good ideas and techniques.

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