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  1. #1
    Senior Member hadeone's Avatar
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    Hands hurt from being on hoods. What's wrong?

    Hey guys. I recently started riding a Cannondale SR400 with RX100 brake levers and during every ride, after a while on the hoods my hands hurt. The palm area, between my thumb and index finger, seems to be under a lot of pressure. I've never had this problem on 2 other bikes I've owned with brake hoods.

    What could be wrong? The position of the hoods (Up/Down/left/right) or the fact that these levers seem a bit narrower than the others?

    This is a aluminum frame which is something new for me. I rode the bike on the original Aluminum fork and now a carbon fork but the hand pain is still there.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    You shouldn't be putting that much pressure on your hands. Is the position the same from your previous bikes? Is the seat tilted forward? Do your gloves have enough padding?

    There's a zillion variables here, and the frame material is a very small component. You should have your bike's fit evaluated by a professional.
    Jeff Wills

    All my bikes.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hadeone View Post
    Hey guys. I recently started riding a Cannondale SR400 with RX100 brake levers and during every ride, after a while on the hoods my hands hurt. The palm area, between my thumb and index finger, seems to be under a lot of pressure. I've never had this problem on 2 other bikes I've owned with brake hoods.

    What could be wrong? The position of the hoods (Up/Down/left/right) or the fact that these levers seem a bit narrower than the others?

    This is a aluminum frame which is something new for me. I rode the bike on the original Aluminum fork and now a carbon fork but the hand pain is still there.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks
    You are supposed to be part of a triangle when you ride. If you are too stretched out you will have more weight on your hands because your triangle is too far forward. If your saddle is too high and your bars too low you will have more weight on your hands. If the saddle is tilted forward you will have too much weight on your hands. I have found that my hoods need to be level with the ramps for long distance riding. But I have a flipped stem. Plus if you are always on the hoods sooner or later your hands will go numb so I move my hands. Lastly how tight are your gloves? Tight gloves will cause the hands to swell and go numb. Just some thoughts.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  4. #4
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    RX100 are nicely shaped levers and Ive never had a problem with them.
    Asses your overall riding position.
    Check the bar position.
    Check the position of the levers on the bar in height and rotation. You can move them around to suit.
    Lastly, you can reprofile the grips by stuffing rolled up slices up old inner tube under the rubber hood covers.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Start by angling the bars up just a bit.
    Then try angling the the nose of the saddle up 1 to 3 degrees.
    Finally you may need to move the brifters up the bars some, but that takes removing bar tape and re-taping the bars.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  6. #6
    Rogue Cyclist RaleighSport's Avatar
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    It got mentioned a bit, but varying hand positions helps a lot and adjusting your fit to distribute your weight properly... and who knows your aluminum bike may just be a lot stiffer then your used to causing the issue...
    "Seriously is what I want to be, so I put on spandex and show off my gear, my junk, my thing, yes my ding-a-ling."

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