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Thread: Sell or keep?

  1. #1
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    Sell or keep?

    I have a 2001 gt aggressor that I love. However after reading how all aliminum frames will eventually fail I want to sell and buy a trek 820 steel frame.

    I only ride dirt bike paths but I'm 6'1" 240 and worry about the stress my weight puts on the frame.

    Am I over thinking this or should I sell? I have a willing buyer ($165). Or should I keep the bike I enjoy.

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    Any opinions?

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    It probably won't break. Keep riding it, save some money, and skip right over the 820 frame and get something cool. When you get to that point, too, you'll know more about cycling, your needs and wants, and when you think back to when you considered getting the 820, you'll be like, "glad I didn't bother with that." That's my .02 anyway.
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

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    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    Don't pay much attention to the aluminum will fail people because if that were a real problem far fewer MTB would be Aluminum and more would be steel. But they aren't so people ride what works. I have a Trek Steel MTB and once it is gone I won't be replaceing it with steel. Remember what your wheels are made of. Most MTBs no longer use Steel rims and what takes more abuse than the rim?
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

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    Aluminum bicycle frames age well and don't mind moisture. If you've been riding your aluminum framed bike fairly regularly throughout the years, at your present weight, then yes, you've subjected it to quite a bit of stress. OTOH, if you haven't been riding it that regularly throughout the years and only occasionally, or perhaps, just on the weekends, then you should most probably keep your bike and not sell it.

    I've always relished the idea of buying a chromoly steel framed MTB and upgrading the fork and derailleurs to something really over the top.

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    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    ^^ ouch! How did that happen?

    If the bike isn't broken just keep riding it and save for a better bike then the Trek. Problem with inexpensive MTB's is that their heavy and the components are sub par. And actually the GT has better components then the Trek, so I would stay with it till more money comes.

    By the way, here is what happens to CF MTB's...sometimes anyways: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUQXn...eature=related Also see the two vid's in my sig line.

    Problem is that there isn't a whole lot of mtb's built out of steel these days, mostly AL and CF, but there is one company who makes a decent one called On-One Inbred X5 26er but it's just a hair over $1,000, but if your wanting to spend $350 on a cheaper bike that will probably have to be replaced in 5 years, why not just save the money since your already a third of the way there? These bikes do come out of England so it's mail order only.

    You could save some money and weight going with a non suspended front end if you don't really need it.

    I'm not much into MTB'g though I do own a couple and their both steel, my best one is a Kona Lava Dome which is surprisingly light and tough but it has no front suspension which doesn't bother me since I don't ride in real rough stuff nor go as fast as I can off road.

    Hopefully others will respond with more experience then I on MTB'g.

  7. #7
    Senior Member shadoman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wordsthoughts View Post
    I have a 2001 gt aggressor that I love. However after reading how all aliminum frames will eventually fail I want to sell and buy a trek 820 steel frame.

    I only ride dirt bike paths but I'm 6'1" 240 and worry about the stress my weight puts on the frame.

    Am I over thinking this or should I sell? I have a willing buyer ($165). Or should I keep the bike I enjoy.
    ALL frames, whether steel,alloy, CF or bamboo will EVENTUALLY fail for one reason or another. Whether or not it happens IN YOUR LIFETIME is the gamble.
    I wouldn't get rid of it unless there was visible structural damage.
    I'm not pokey, but I'm certainly not speedy... sorta half-fast, I guess...

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    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    It's especially more of a gamble if your beating the bike up riding on tough off road rides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wordsthoughts View Post
    I have a 2001 gt aggressor that I love.
    Keep the bike you love. Buy a new one when it breaks or you fall in love with another bike.
    2012 Trek 5.2 Madone
    1985 Raleigh Olympian

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    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    The BS is strong in this thread...

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    You do realize that airplanes are made from aluminum, right? Are you seeing airplanes falling out of the sky everyday because 'all aluminum eventually fails'?

    People love to snow you with their technobabble about how aluminum can only handle so many stress cycles, etc. This is all nice theory, but I think you will find, in practice, only a very small number of aluminum (or steel, or carbon) frames break. Just do a google search on 'broken aluminum bicycle frames' - you'll find very few actual reports of broken frames. This is the difference between theory and practice (and common sense).

    Here is a question which none of the 'all aluminum eventually fails' crowd never addresses: 'what percentage of all aluminum bikes in existence have failed due to repeated stress?' - I don't know what that number is, but it has to be very small otherwise bike companies would have one heck of a lot of lawsuits to deal with.

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    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wordsthoughts View Post
    I have a 2001 gt aggressor that I love. However after reading how all aliminum frames will eventually fail I want to sell and buy a trek 820 steel frame.

    I only ride dirt bike paths but I'm 6'1" 240 and worry about the stress my weight puts on the frame.

    Am I over thinking this or should I sell? I have a willing buyer ($165). Or should I keep the bike I enjoy.
    You're worrying needlessly. If you were bombing downhills that's one thing, and that's .00001% of riders. Worry about whether you are saving enough money for your financial security, that's a genuine worry.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=THE ARS;14156797]Wrong.

    A high quality steel frame does not have a finite life.

    An aluminum frame does.

    A carbon frame does.

    Sell that chinese POS and get yourself a real frame.

    Or listen to these guys and end up in a nursing home.


    Or he could simply go to any local Single track MTB course and see what everyone is riding and decide that way.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  14. #14
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    That's why bridges and springs are all made of aluminum...wait, what are they made of?

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    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    Dude you are a bridge troll. Stop dispensing nonsense. Virtually all modern commercial airplanes, up to the recent explosion in carbon, are primarily aluminum. And I'll bet you don't like carbon either. Racing motorcycles are made of aluminum. I have a 10 year old MTB that I used to whale on that I now use as a round town bike to take my kids on rides. So stop trying to fill people's heads with what amounts to fear mongering lies.

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    I appreciate the responses. A little background may help.

    I purchased my bike used last year. The man said his son won the bike in a contest when he was 16. Said his son rode it a few times and got his drivers license and pretty much left the bike in the garage. The man said that he didn't use it cause he rode road bikes.


    Now the bike looked pretty flawless and only needed lube and light cleaning. The tires still had the new look and all. I was happy til I learned about aluminum failures. I searched and had a hard time finding bad info on my bike. What I did find was that bikes are made for riders who weigh 140-160lbs. This info has scared the hell out of me.

    Although I'm not jumping or doing crazy drops I do stand up and pump through steep hills and stand up on bumps and most down hills to save my man parts. My guess is my weight plus my habits are killing the frame. When I add this to the unknown of my bikes real history I start panicking.

    I know the trek 820 isn't top of the line but being steel I figured it should last me 4-5 years with maintenance at my lbs. also a steel frame would be a good base to upgrade components on.

  17. #17
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    Words, the only place aluminum bikes are considered dangerous is amongst a certain very vocal minority on the internet. Even low end mountain bikes can handle the abuse you are giving that bike. IDK who told you that bikes were built for sub 160 lbs, but with the possible exception of some very light road bikes, that is BS. On the other hand, if you like riding and a new bike will make you happier, than go out and do your part to jump start the economy.

  18. #18
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    Since that aluminum MTB has been just sitting around for the most part, you probably could get many years of use out of it, most probably more than just five or six years. However, if you'd like to just make one MTB purchase, the purchase of a lifetime, then the Trek 820 would be that bike. Once you've upgraded it and perhaps later placed a spectacular fork on it, it would become peerless. Peerless and awesome!

    I've had similar thoughts lately about the Giant Boulder, too! Once you've got that chromoly steel frame, suddenly the possibilities become endless. The possibilities become endless, because you have more time to make better upgrade choices.
    Last edited by SlimRider; 04-29-12 at 06:34 AM.

  19. #19
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    Thanks I'll ride mines and not sell it but will still buy a 820 this summer.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=THE ARS;14157435]
    Quote Originally Posted by Mobile 155 View Post

    A lot of 240lb men riding ten year old aluminum mountain bikes there?

    Tom
    In the US home of the supersize? You think those big guys aren't there? Have you looked at any of the ten best lists for MTBs in any of the mags? What sells more? What do most of the manufacturers sell more of? In fact I met Bill Walton at several Cycling events and what do you think he was riding? (not a little guy) I have nothing against steel except the weight and they rust. I don't care for the flex they provide but I can also see why they are favored by touring cyclists. Shoot even steel bikes upgrade to Aluminum bars wheels and seat posts. Yes there are some custom builders that can build someone a nice steel bike. But there is no need to go against the flow if you already have a bike and you are just starting out. Not when most people have moved to Aluminum anyway. The best advice a new person can get is , try before you buy, and see what others that ride in your area are riding. Chances are what works for your local riders will work for you. There is no reason for the OP to trade his Aluminum bike for a steel bike made in the same factory.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wordsthoughts View Post
    Thanks I'll ride mines and not sell it but will still buy a 820 this summer.
    Now you are talking like a cyclist. N+1 is an infection that isn't a bad thing. You can't have too many bikes.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  22. #22
    long time visiter Alfster's Avatar
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    I have a 2005 Trek 6700 Hardtail MB. It's an aluminum frame. I ride it mostly on easy dirt / gravel paths, as well as on pavement ... it's my basic work horse. I have used it for some single track, but maybe only 20 hours worth. For this type of riding, I doubt the frame will give out. If you're a more hardcore mountain biker, then other materials may be more suitable.

  23. #23
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alfster View Post
    I have a 2005 Trek 6700 Hardtail MB. It's an aluminum frame. I ride it mostly on easy dirt / gravel paths, as well as on pavement ... it's my basic work horse. I have used it for some single track, but maybe only 20 hours worth. For this type of riding, I doubt the frame will give out. If you're a more hardcore mountain biker, then other materials may be more suitable.
    What other material would be more suitable? Over 90% of "hardcore" mountain bikers ride aluminum. The number might still be over 95% although carbon is starting to make some serious inroads. Hell over 90% of internet mountain bikers probably ride aluminum, and there are way more steel is real types on the interwebs than in real life!

  24. #24
    KingoftheMountain wannabe Savagewolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE ARS View Post
    I had to get back with you, smart guy.

    What plane is made from aluminum?

    Can you tell me about it?

    Thanks.

    Tom
    http://www.aluminum.org/Content/Navi...ft/default.htm

  25. #25
    Senior Member WickedThump's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE ARS View Post
    Wrong.

    A high quality steel frame does not have a finite life.

    An aluminum frame does.

    A carbon frame does.

    Sell that chinese POS and get yourself a real frame.

    Or listen to these guys and end up in a nursing home.
    I have a friend who just bought a used Shockwave. He weighs almost 300lbs and thinks those bikes are indestructable. I think he needs to see this picture.

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