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  1. #1
    Senior Member stevebiker's Avatar
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    How much does your bike weigh?

    As a hiker, the first thing I look at in a peice of gear is the weight. Absolutely essential to hiking. If the seller doesn't list the weight, up front and center on its webpage, the gear will not sell. The seller will also be considered stupid.

    But so far, none of the bike sellers list bike weights. Why? My thought is that everyone probably understands the general weight of bikes made of carbon fiber, aluminum, steel, and so forth, and the difference is considered neglibible since you don't feel every ounce (unlike in the hiking world). Right?

    Regardless, what does your bike weigh? I've asked the weights of some carbon fiber bikes in the local shops and gotten 15 pounds. One guy there said his weighed 14 -- and he was very proud of his bike. What about yours?
    Last edited by stevebiker; 05-01-12 at 12:35 PM.

  2. #2
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    As light as I can afford. Do have a couple at just over 15lbs but these are good road bikes. Then there is the Runaround road bike at 18lbs and the Beater at 28.

    Although there is no way I would like to tackle the Hills on the Beater- there is no way I am taking the lightweights down town to do the shopping.

    Mountain bikes and a couple at 22 and 24lbs and the beast at 55lbs. Full offroad Tandem that is built to take everything that a rough downhill can hit it with.

    But weight of a bike does not matter too much unless you are climbing mountains or racing. What can matter is the quality and weight of the wheels.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  3. #3
    Senior Member mulveyr's Avatar
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    My favorite bike is my Box Dog Pelican, configured as an all-rounder with full fenders, front rack, genhub and lights, etc. About 27 pounds, more or less.

    A heck of a lot more comfortable than my 18-pound "fast" bike, which in the end, I'm not really any faster on.
    Knows the weight of my bike to the nearest 10 pounds.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    Jamis list weight. Some of the others don't. Lapierre list weight as equipped. The problem is most listed weights exclude such things as water bottle cages, water bottles, and pedals. Most people ditch the stock wheels and get lighter ones but new wheels list weight without tires or skewers. Add a seat bag and pump and then weigh the bike. For group rides my CF bike goes close to 20 pounds, water, pump, bag and all. If I race it with my race wheels and no pump seat bag and Light tires I can get down to 16.5. My Back up bike hasn't been weighed so I can't guess. But it feels lighter than my last steel road bike and that was 22 pounds. My problem is I am not light enough myself to ride the ultra light wheels like some can. For my weight 1600 gram wheels are about as light as I can get. American Classic makes a 1100 gram clincher but unless I was down in the Stapfam weight range I could't race them. That then would get me into the 15+ pound range.
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevebiker View Post
    As a hiker, the first thing I look at in a peice of gear is the weight. Absolutely essential to hiking. If the seller doesn't list the weight, up front and center on its webpage, the gear will not sell. The seller will also be considered stupid.

    But so far, none of the bike sellers list bike weights. Why? My thought is that everyone probably understands the general weight of bikes made of carbon fiber, aluminum, steel, and so forth, and the difference is considered neglibible since you don't feel every ounce (unlike in the hiking world). Right?

    Regardless, what does your bike weigh? I've asked the weights of some carbon fiber bikes in the local shops and gotten 15 pounds. One guy there said his weighed 14 -- and he was very proud of his bike. What about yours?
    Among road bikes, the more expensive the bike, the less it weighs. Manufacturers usually don't publish weights, but the rule will hold. I have an entry-level aluminum road bike that I bought for $600 and it weighs 22 pounds (with bottle holders, without a seat bag). A high-end carbon bike can weigh 15 lbs or sometimes even less. IIRC, professional bicycle racing events set the minimum permitted weight of the bike to 15 pounds.

    In the market for parts, weights are almost always published. You can weigh your own parts and get an idea of what it would cost you to shave off a pound or two. For example, mine came with wheels that weighed 2200 g, excluding tires, tubes, etc. I can get a 1400 g pair of wheels for $600. My saddle weighs 413 g, but there's a number of different saddles available in 200-250 g range for around $100. My bike came with fairly heavy 700x25 tires weighing ~280 g each. Depending on how much I care about weight vs. longevity and puncture protection, I can go as low as 140 g for about $60 per tire.

    With enough money I can probably get my bike at least down to 16, even keeping the entry-level aluminum frame and fork.
    Last edited by eugenek; 05-01-12 at 02:28 PM.

  6. #6
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    One road bike at about 17lbs. Another at a pound or so more. A FG/SS in steel at 24lbs, and a 1980s tourer, also in steel, at about 27lbs. Finally, a heavy-duty expedition tourer at 38 lbs.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  7. #7
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
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    '88 Diamondback Ascent fixed conversion: 31 lbs
    '64 Armstrong 3-speed: 33 lbs
    '91 Bianchi Eros: 26 lbs

    All measured without tools, lights, or water bottles. Still need to weigh my '88 Bianchi Premio.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gallo's Avatar
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    2008 wilier motorolio 18lb (maybe less I have not weighed it since changing rims and bars)

    1985 Nishiki Tri A 24 lb

    my mtb ?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevebiker View Post
    As a hiker, the first thing I look at in a peice of gear is the weight. Absolutely essential to hiking.
    It's (more) essential to hiking.

    Generally, bicycles of the same type and price are going to be fairly close in weight. Small differences in weight aren't really what people should be concerned with.

    Manufacturers don't list weights because they might change the components and really don't need to have customers complaining about their bike being 1/2 pounds heavier than the "advertised" weight. And, of course, different frame sizes have different weights.

    If you are really concerned, shops can usually weigh the particular bike you are interested in.

  10. #10
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    To be blunt, weight simply doesn't matter as much for cycling as it does for hiking. The weight is not going on your back and revolving weight matters more than the weight of the bike and parts (all of it matters obviously but the stuff you spin around matters more). If the bike is well made, the weight will be reasonable. It is possible for bikes and bicycle parts to be so light that they are prone to breaking. Weight is simply oversold as a criterion for determining quality.

  11. #11
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    The bike carries you, not you carrying the bike, with few exceptions..

    AKA, Weight Weenies .. have lots of people taking lots of money
    from the OCD stricken, to shave off those pesky Milli-Grams..
    http://weightweenies.starbike.com/listings.php
    Pro's bikes can go for $6k+ to get the weight down ..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-01-12 at 05:04 PM.

  12. #12
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    My bikes range in weight from 20.5 to 50 pounds... road and mountain bikes are the light end of that scale while the utility bikes are at the other end... my extra bike weighs 50 pounds before anything goes on it but as I can get fairly low and aero I can ride at a fairly decent pace. A lighter bike with a more upright riding position would not offer much of a benefit due to the added wind resiostance.

    The biggest difference in performance comes from how aerodynamic a bike is and weight is secondary until you are climbing and even then, a few pounds does not make a noticeable difference unless you are racing for money.

    Like a car, the unsprung weight has the most effect on performance as lighter wheels and tyres can really change a bicycle.

  13. #13
    Crispy Member ahsposo's Avatar
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    I have two that are pretty light and one that's heavier.

    I live in pancake flat coastal GA so I really don't care.

    If I go to the mountains to ride I take the light one that has more than one gear.

    In any event I am heavier than any of my bikes.
    Quote Originally Posted by toddles View Post
    If I gotta look up words, it's not worth my time.

  14. #14
    Grammar Cop Condorita's Avatar
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    As long as I can pick it up and put it in the back of the van, it's light enough. I'm no "weight weenie" checking every gram I put on my bike. Can't think of much that's sillier.
    That which does not kill me has made a massive tactical blunder.
    Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen. Louis L'Amour
    '07 Giant Cypress WSD "Radagast the Beige-and-Black" * '97 (?) Bianchi Premio "Orion" * '09 Trek Allant "The Black Pearl"

  15. #15
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Weight, whether on the bike or on the rider, really does make a difference when climbing. Most people may not care about that, but preferring lighter equipment is not silliness for those who race.

    Of course, the first and cheaper step should be to remove the excess weight from the rider...
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Every bike has 3 weights:

    What the manufacturer says that it weighs.
    What the owner thinks that it weighs.
    What my scale says that it weighs.

    Care to guess which one is usually highest?

  17. #17
    Senior Member JeePakXJ's Avatar
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    Ive got my Trek 7.2FX with cable lock, frame mounted air pump, gell seat cover and Specialized Armadillo tires (all the rest is factory) at 28.8lbs.

    This is my first bike, my dad gave it to me a few months ago after i moved out so now im getting into biking for a commuter to work and a lot of exercise.
    24yrs old
    Trek 2200 Composite

  18. #18
    Senior Member Pilky's Avatar
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    My mountain bike is 33 pounds and the road bike is 21. Those are the only bikes I'v weighed so far.

  19. #19
    carpe diem elboGreaze's Avatar
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    My two main riders: Cannondale CAAD 9-5 (63cm), 20lbs.
    Schwinn World , 105 STI , (63cm) , 30lbs.
    I ride because... I really enjoy it !

  20. #20
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Pinarello is around 22lbs. Mongoose is around 24 lbs. Haven't weighed the others yet. Well I did ride the Free Spirit up to a fish shop and put it on their big dock scale, which I don't believe to be accurate, and got a result of 20 lbs.

    Weight doesn't mean all that much to me, though."

    OH, and back in the day most would list weights in catalogs. Musta gotten tired of 6'4" dudes calling customer service and complaining, though
    Last edited by LesterOfPuppets; 05-01-12 at 07:47 PM.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  21. #21
    Senior Member Broid's Avatar
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    Cannondale Supersix Evo, with bling, 13.96 pounds or 6.3kg

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ght?highlight=
    "You never know what's around the next bend in the road..."

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    Weight, whether on the bike or on the rider, really does make a difference when climbing.


    No one is talking about the difference between a 17 lb bike and a 30 lb one.

    Extra weight matters most when climbing but the small differences in bikes of the same type and cost don't matter much at all. That is, a difference of a pound or so, is not important (unless you are racing). Even when climbing.

    Anyway, it's a bit silly to argue about small differences in weight when most of the riders arguing about it rarely ride in the drops. That is, aerodynamics is generally much more important than a bit of extra weight.

    Hikers don't have to worry about aerodynamics.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 05-02-12 at 09:19 AM.

  23. #23
    Senior Member stevebiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    Hikers don't have to worry about aerodynamics.
    Unless you're on a knife-edge ridge and the wind is whipping. Then you'll have to worry about aerodynamics one way or another.

  24. #24
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    When I was a much faster rider my friend said that if I traded in my beloved steel for a carbon fibre bike he'd have no hope of keeping up with me... and he was a cat 3 rider.

    My reply was, "you can't keep up with me now".

    He has gotten faster and now I can't keep up with him.

    It is all about the engine... mine has gotten older and biggest issue is that the enmgine has a piston that misfires while he's is still a fairly new model with fewer creaks in the chassis.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevebiker View Post
    Unless you're on a knife-edge ridge and the wind is whipping. Then you'll have to worry about aerodynamics one way or another.
    (There are exceptions to almost anything.)

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