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Old 06-09-12, 10:51 PM   #1
GEOlson
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Do your shoes fit symmetrically?

I've noticed when I have my SPD shoes clipped in, it seems like my left foot is further behind the pedal axle than my right foot. My feet are about the same size and I have the cleats in the same spot, or did before I adjusted them. My cleat can't go any further back on the shoe because the plate that goes inside the shoe is against the recessed area. I'm thinking about trimming the plate down. Anyone else have different cleat placement between left and right feet? And by the way, is there a solution to slightly adjusting cleats once the teeth have made an impression, the cleat always seems to slide back into the previous imprint when tightening the screws.
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Old 06-10-12, 12:50 AM   #2
Camilo
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Adjust to feel and comfort. You will find the fore/aft position might be tweeked as will the angle of the cleat.

My feet are not the same: left is larger (maybe 1/8-1/4 US size, 1/4-1/2 Euro size... I can usually ignore the difference, or easily make it work by putting in a thin insole under the smaller foot's normal insole). But this means that the position of the ball of the foot is also different. In fact. the larger foot is flatter than the smaller one, which means the ball is a little bit more forward. That I can feel w/ cleat position, but I just tweek it and it's not hard to do.

It also seems I need to adjust my left cleat to bring the heel out a little to keep it off the crank arm.

Tweek to desired effect. The human body is not perfectly symetrical!
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Old 06-10-12, 10:55 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
Tweak to desired effect. The human body is not perfectly symmetrical!
That's what you need to keep in mind. Adjust your cleats to fit your body, not the other way around.

FWIW: my right leg is 1/2" shorter than my left (yeah, I run around in circles), my right foot pronates (rolls outward) a few degrees, and it points outward (duck foots) a whole bunch. I've dealt with this over the years in various ways, but my riding position is still a compromise. If I wanted to correct everything, I could spend thousands of dollars on custom shoes, cranks and pedals.

If you want to get a definitive answer, consult a bicycle fitting professional. Some of them have the Fit Kit RAD device: http://bikefitkit.com/fit_kit/rad_kit.php , which can help tune the cleat position. As you've found, this works best with new shoes. Once the cleats have taken a set, they tend to return to their original spot.
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