Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Schwinn from Target

    Im hoping to get a new bike, its a schwinn from *gasp* target........

    if I get it, i am going to assemble it myself and was wondering what i may need to look for. I know the basics, like checking the bb and headset, etc, adjust the derailers, and brakes, anad some new tubes and rim tape.......anything else come to mind?

    And I know this is bike forums, and the disdain for big box bikes is sometimes hard to overcome, but this one is in my budget and it got some good reviews, from many outlets. No hard riding, just some MUP and some bike lane fitness riding. So can we please avoid the "it's junk and will fail at 10 miles" stuff please? pretty please?


    its this one : http://www.schwinnbikes.com/catalog/...ry/151/#/specs
    Last edited by ianstew; 06-13-12 at 07:27 PM.
    Elitists suck.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,741
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    it's junk and will fail at 10 miles

    Actually, IDK. That's kinda the problem. None of the parts are specified. So there is no way to know how crappy they are. With $250 in your pocket, there is no way you wouldnt be better on CL though. Or bump up to 3 bills and check Bikes Direct.

    Sorry

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The cracks list pickin's here are pretty slim. And it just isn't in the budget tospend more, unfortunately, as much as I would like to lol

    I was actually looking for some info on what I should pay attention to during assembly, like any tips on where to lube, tighten, etc
    Elitists suck.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The best thing you can do is...pay attention to detail... If you have the skill, clean and re-lube the headset, bottom bracket and hub bearings. I am not a fan of the factory grease. Otherwise, a normal tune up and adjustment should be fine.
    Then, ride your bike and enjoy it!

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Will you be climbing any serious hills or inclines?
    Last edited by SlimRider; 06-13-12 at 08:51 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lostbob, thank you for your reply. I was thinking that the best thing to do would be to just service everything, grease and tighten up everything. I dont know how to true wheels, but my lbs will do it for 10.00 a pair if there are no tires/tubes on them, so i think ill go that route for wheels.
    Elitists suck.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Well you be climbing any serious hills or inclines?
    no, relatively flat here. some small hills on my routes, but nothing major.
    Elitists suck.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    750
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What tools do you have? You could get by without taking anything apart, but like lost bob said, if you can strip it down and clean and grease that would be good. If you don't have the tools to do the bb or the hubs, you'll have to live with it or buy them.

    Besides that, just take care in doing the final assembly, adjusting the brakes, setting the limit screws on the derailed, making sure everything is tightened properly.

    My neighbor has a bike from Target that's very similar to what you showed there....and he's gotten decent service out of it. If it's what you can afford, get it and ride the hell out of it.

    BUT...IF you can afford a tiny bit more ( I assume you have sales tax on the bike from TG), get this instead:

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../avenue_fb.htm

  9. #9
    Senior Member sonatageek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cleveland,Ohio
    Posts
    2,678
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know if the bike is on sale again (it was $205 a few weeks ago) but here is another possible bike that might work for you. With shipping the cost would be right around $200.

    Wow, talk about posting the wrong link. This is the correct link for the Mongoose Crossway at Nashbar:
    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...88_-1___202383
    Last edited by sonatageek; 06-15-12 at 10:56 AM.

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ianstew View Post
    no, relatively flat here. some small hills on my routes, but nothing major.
    Well if you don't have any major hills to speak of, you can get a quality single speed, from nashbar, bikesdirect, or amazon. Therefore, you'll only basically have just simple maintenance labor and costs with which to contend.

    Besides, by the time that you're really ready to purchase a genuine quality road bike, instead of discarding your previously owned box bike, you can keep your single speed, just in case of emergencies.

    Get a single speed!

    I'd recommend the following:

    1) The Motobecane Track Single Speed ~ $280
    www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/track.htm

    2) The Nashbar Hounder ~ $185
    www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_504148_-1_202614

    3) The Dawes Revolver ~ $200
    www.amazon.com/Dawes-Revolver-Single-Speed-Track/dp/B007R6RRRE
    Last edited by SlimRider; 06-14-12 at 12:09 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
    My Bikes
    86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
    Posts
    6,890
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Definitely grease wheel bearings and bottom bracket bearings if not a cartridge. That is one place they scrimp on the grease.

    You might even want to buy some new (grade 25) ball bearings and replace the retainer bearings in the wheels. You can fit an extra ball or 2 that way.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Flying Merkel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Costa Mesa CA
    Posts
    2,510
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I bought a Schwinn Clear Creek for $20.00 off C-list. This is a Target-level bike. Fixed it up, rode it about 25 miles up a few small hills and into a headwind.

    My take: It was a workable bike. Everything worked after adjusting & lubing. The shifting was as good as gripshifters can get, and better than a lot of trigger shifter. The rims appeared to be the weakest point. Heavy and spongy due to the "comfort" design. Plush front suspension, boingy seat post, and fluffy springy saddle made it a marshmallow to ride.

    I'm not a big fan of the gimmicky looking rims on the Tourist. Looks like a styling item more than a practical design. If you want a new bike you can't go too far wrong for $260.00. That will get a very nice used bike here (Orange County CA). Learn how to keep things in adjustment, and it should work OK. Not great, but you can sell the bike and recover a good chunk of your outlay if you're not happy.
    Pronounced "Murkle"

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Walterboro, South Carolina
    My Bikes
    1975 Motobecane Grand Touring, 2012 Specialized Secteur.
    Posts
    150
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Schwinn Prelude, very similar bike to the one you've shown cept for drop bars and mine has a double crank instead of a triple. It currently has over 3k miles on it and I still ride it almost everyday. From 15 to 40+ a day.

    Is it the best ride in the world? Nope
    Are the components perfect? Nope
    Is it serviceable and at least a dependable ride everyday? Yes it is.

    Outside of the shifting being a tad frustrating and the fact that no amount of tuning can help that, it's a good bike. It's a boat anchor compared to a shop quality bike's weight too, but I've enjoyed every minute I've spent on it and you'll never hear me knocking a bike like it. It got me into this hobby at a price that made sense to me at the time and now that I know I'll be riding for a good long while I've upgraded. Buying my Schwinn was probably the smartest thing I could have done.

    If you like it, and it fits what you want to do with it, get it and don't look back. If later on you realize you love cycling get a new bike, if you realize you don't like it, you're not out much.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Schwinn Trailway. They sit next to the Tourists in the store. I have over 3400 miles on it. I didn't overhaul it when new. The BB started making crunchy sounds at about 1500, I replaced the bearings with chromed steel bearings and regreased it. You can go all out with a sealed one like the un-54 but I didn't want to invest in another tool to install it. With the left over chromed steel bearings from my order, I replaced and repacked the back hub too, although it didn't need it. The wheels are uh true enough. Aside from that, I it's a fine bike. I still ride it. Aside from a sealed BB, it's pretty much what you'd get from a $300 lbs bike.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I will mention that I was able to haggle for the Trailway in the store. It was assembled with the fork backwards and loose and it was against store policy to sell me any of the unassembled ones in the back, so they sold it to me with 20% off.

  16. #16
    You gonna eat that? Doohickie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas Church of Hopeful Uncertainty
    My Bikes
    1966 Raleigh DL-1 Tourist, 1973 Schwinn Varsity, 1983 Raleigh Marathon, 1994 Nishiki Sport XRS
    Posts
    13,936
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 on being concerned about the wheels. If you're over, say, 180 pounds, I'd be concerned about popping spokes. When I wore out the wheels on my old hybrid, I got a replacement set at the LBS for $120 and so far it has lasted pretty well, so if it turns out the wheels are absolute junk, you might have to consider that.
    I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



    Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."

  17. #17
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,805
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bike shops occasionally take trade-ins, and do consignment resales of decent bikes.

  18. #18
    Warning:Annoying to jerks RaleighSport's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    STS
    My Bikes
    Leader 725, Centurion Turbo, Raleigh Team Technium, Schwinn Premis, GT Tequesta, Bridgestone CB-2
    Posts
    5,768
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh.. my friend has that and he weighs over 200+ it's a good bike for what it is... the major thing he and I both don't like is the 1 piece shifter/lever combo his has altus derailers though, the SR crankset looks even cheaper in person fyi.. but he actually finds he enjoys riding on the road, so you may have a decent bike on your hands...
    “Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.”


    ― Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emerson in His Journals

  19. #19
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Grand Prix, Giant Innova, Nishiki Sebring, Trek 7.5FX
    Posts
    5,804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When it comes to Schwinn, I say, buy the Signature Schwinn...

  20. #20
    Warning:Annoying to jerks RaleighSport's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    STS
    My Bikes
    Leader 725, Centurion Turbo, Raleigh Team Technium, Schwinn Premis, GT Tequesta, Bridgestone CB-2
    Posts
    5,768
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    When it comes to Schwinn, I say, buy the Signature Schwinn...
    Good advice.
    “Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.”


    ― Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emerson in His Journals

  21. #21
    wle
    wle is offline
    Senior Member wle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    atlanta ga
    My Bikes
    road: 1999 GT road:40Kmi+ // 2001 fuji finest AL:9Kmi+//1991 schwinn paramount ODG:0.1Kmi+
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    how do you know it is your size?
    usually they are just one size
    wle

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I guess I also forgot that the pedals had started making a grinding sound around 800~1000 miles. I repacked them since it didn't require any special tools. I also just got a parktool tension meter today; turns out the spokes are way off of each other in terms of tension. So if you get someone to true your wheels, make sure they also re-tension them.

    Contrary to what the website says, the Tourist actually has an altus drivetrain with 8 gears in the back.

    When you stand back to really look at the Tourist, it really is close to a flat bar touring bike. Seems to have at least a 1:1 gear ratio, fender & rear rack eyelets, 700c solid fork with brake bosses, 32 oddly patterned spokes per wheel, relatively relaxed geometry and not horrible chainstay length. If you look at it from that angle, you could make the argument that it is a really good buy for entry level touring.

  23. #23
    wle
    wle is offline
    Senior Member wle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    atlanta ga
    My Bikes
    road: 1999 GT road:40Kmi+ // 2001 fuji finest AL:9Kmi+//1991 schwinn paramount ODG:0.1Kmi+
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mrleft2000 View Post
    I guess I also forgot that the pedals had started making a grinding sound around 800~1000 miles. I repacked them since it didn't require any special tools. I also just got a parktool tension meter today; turns out the spokes are way off of each other in terms of tension. So if you get someone to true your wheels, make sure they also re-tension them.

    Contrary to what the website says, the Tourist actually has an altus drivetrain with 8 gears in the back.

    When you stand back to really look at the Tourist, it really is close to a flat bar touring bike. Seems to have at least a 1:1 gear ratio, fender & rear rack eyelets, 700c solid fork with brake bosses, 32 oddly patterned spokes per wheel, relatively relaxed geometry and not horrible chainstay length. If you look at it from that angle, you could make the argument that it is a really good buy for entry level touring.
    actually it may not have 1:1 low gearing
    one review says - the specs on the schwinn web site do not match the target bike
    also that biggest back cog looks about 25ish, i doubt the smallest ring is under 30

    wle

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Doohickie View Post
    +1 on being concerned about the wheels. If you're over, say, 180 pounds, I'd be concerned about popping spokes. When I wore out the wheels on my old hybrid, I got a replacement set at the LBS for $120 and so far it has lasted pretty well, so if it turns out the wheels are absolute junk, you might have to consider that.
    Schwinn says weight capacity is 300lbs. I'm 200 plus, but not anywhere close to 300.

    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Bike shops occasionally take trade-ins, and do consignment resales of decent bikes.
    Mine does not, unfortunately.

    Quote Originally Posted by RaleighSport View Post
    Oh.. my friend has that and he weighs over 200+ it's a good bike for what it is... the major thing he and I both don't like is the 1 piece shifter/lever combo his has altus derailers though, the SR crankset looks even cheaper in person fyi.. but he actually finds he enjoys riding on the road, so you may have a decent bike on your hands...
    Most of the bikes in my price range have grip shifters. This one has the rapid fire shimano's like my MTB does. I love them, and it's what I'm used to.

    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    When it comes to Schwinn, I say, buy the Signature Schwinn...
    My first choice of bike is the Giant Defy 5, but since it is not in my budget, I'm looking at this schwinn

    Quote Originally Posted by wle View Post
    how do you know it is your size?
    usually they are just one size
    wle
    Did the old aisle ride at target. chart says it should fit, and it feels right. better than my MTB which is a little small frame wise.
    Elitists suck.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    161
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sevenmag View Post
    I have a Schwinn Prelude, very similar bike to the one you've shown cept for drop bars and mine has a double crank instead of a triple. It currently has over 3k miles on it and I still ride it almost everyday. From 15 to 40+ a day.

    Is it the best ride in the world? Nope
    Are the components perfect? Nope
    Is it serviceable and at least a dependable ride everyday? Yes it is.

    Outside of the shifting being a tad frustrating and the fact that no amount of tuning can help that, it's a good bike. It's a boat anchor compared to a shop quality bike's weight too, but I've enjoyed every minute I've spent on it and you'll never hear me knocking a bike like it. It got me into this hobby at a price that made sense to me at the time and now that I know I'll be riding for a good long while I've upgraded. Buying my Schwinn was probably the smartest thing I could have done.

    If you like it, and it fits what you want to do with it, get it and don't look back. If later on you realize you love cycling get a new bike, if you realize you don't like it, you're not out much.
    Cool. Thank you for your post. I'm thinking this schwinn or the 299 one if i can swing it will be good for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Merkel View Post
    I bought a Schwinn Clear Creek for $20.00 off C-list. This is a Target-level bike. Fixed it up, rode it about 25 miles up a few small hills and into a headwind.

    My take: It was a workable bike. Everything worked after adjusting & lubing. The shifting was as good as gripshifters can get, and better than a lot of trigger shifter. The rims appeared to be the weakest point. Heavy and spongy due to the "comfort" design. Plush front suspension, boingy seat post, and fluffy springy saddle made it a marshmallow to ride.

    I'm not a big fan of the gimmicky looking rims on the Tourist. Looks like a styling item more than a practical design. If you want a new bike you can't go too far wrong for $260.00. That will get a very nice used bike here (Orange County CA). Learn how to keep things in adjustment, and it should work OK. Not great, but you can sell the bike and recover a good chunk of your outlay if you're not happy.
    Thank you for your post. I kinda like the wheel look on it lol

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    Definitely grease wheel bearings and bottom bracket bearings if not a cartridge. That is one place they scrimp on the grease.

    You might even want to buy some new (grade 25) ball bearings and replace the retainer bearings in the wheels. You can fit an extra ball or 2 that way.
    Thanks for the tip!

    Quote Originally Posted by SlimRider View Post
    Well if you don't have any major hills to speak of, you can get a quality single speed, from nashbar, bikesdirect, or amazon. Therefore, you'll only basically have just simple maintenance labor and costs with which to contend.

    Besides, by the time that you're really ready to purchase a genuine quality road bike, instead of discarding your previously owned box bike, you can keep your single speed, just in case of emergencies.

    Get a single speed!

    I'd recommend the following:

    1) The Motobecane Track Single Speed ~ $280
    www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/track.htm

    2) The Nashbar Hounder ~ $185
    www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_504148_-1_202614

    3) The Dawes Revolver ~ $200
    www.amazon.com/Dawes-Revolver-Single-Speed-Track/dp/B007R6RRRE
    I dunno about SS, i kinda like gears lol. But I may take a SS for a test ride, my LBS has a SS for a decent price. Thanks for the reply!

    Quote Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
    What tools do you have? You could get by without taking anything apart, but like lost bob said, if you can strip it down and clean and grease that would be good. If you don't have the tools to do the bb or the hubs, you'll have to live with it or buy them.

    Besides that, just take care in doing the final assembly, adjusting the brakes, setting the limit screws on the derailed, making sure everything is tightened properly.

    My neighbor has a bike from Target that's very similar to what you showed there....and he's gotten decent service out of it. If it's what you can afford, get it and ride the hell out of it.

    BUT...IF you can afford a tiny bit more ( I assume you have sales tax on the bike from TG), get this instead:

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/.../avenue_fb.htm
    That seems to be a nice bike. I will look at it more. I'm still leery about buying a bike on the internet, as I can't ride it beforehand. It's supposed to be a cup/cone type bearing, which i can service. cartridge type I'd have to buy the bb tool i guess. I'm still weighing my options though, and I appreciate your reply!
    Elitists suck.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •