Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-11-05, 12:16 AM   #1
merlinny
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
weight specs, esp Trek 7500fx

I'm brand new to cycling, so I apologize if my question betrays my ignorance, but I am having difficulty finding weight specs for bikes. For example, I'm seriously thinking about buying the Trek 7500fx (based on online reviews and comments from cycling friends), and I'd like to know how much it weighs. I'm curious in general, and I'd also like to know how it compares to road bikes so I know how much I'm giving up for a hybrid vs road bike. The Trek site doesn't say, and I haven't been able to find the information elsewhere. Why is this data not available on the Trek site? Because there are various configurations?

Any help very much appreciated. Thanks.
merlinny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-05, 05:39 PM   #2
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The bike you mentioned is one of the best bikes in its particular market category, and weighs about the same as any good bike of its type. You do NOT "give something up" by riding a good hybrid. You gain a more comfortable riding position, the cushy and stable ride of bigger tires, the load carrying ability of longer chain stays, the shock absorption of a longer wheelbase and the stable steering of a relaxed headtube angle. You "give up" pretending to be Lance Armstrong...something you probably have no interest in doing.

I have a bike that weights 19 pounds. Four or five that weigh 21 to 25 pounds. Several weigh 26 to 30 pounds. And, my "shopping" bike (with racks, bags, and multiple lighting systems) weighs 40 pounds. All are equally fun and enjoyable to ride. And, on my typical 20 mile route through the level swamp called Houston, my typical "time" (for what THAT is worth) tends to be more or less the same on the 19 pound bike as on the 40 pound bike.

Get a bike that suits YOUR riding needs, and don't worry about weight. The bike you mentioned, depending on which size you select, and which tires you put on it, will weigh only a few pounds more than a "skinny" tire roadbike in the same price range.

Last edited by alanbikehouston; 01-11-05 at 06:44 PM.
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-05, 06:41 PM   #3
bsyptak
Luggite
 
bsyptak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 1,906
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think it's that much. I'd day closer to 23-25. My Giant Cypress SX was 23.5 I believe, very similar to the 7500fx. It also has an alum fork vs my steel one.
bsyptak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-05, 07:41 PM   #4
halfspeed
Senior Member
 
halfspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: SE Minnesota
Bikes: are better than yours.
Posts: 12,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinny
I'm brand new to cycling, so I apologize if my question betrays my ignorance, but I am having difficulty finding weight specs for bikes. For example, I'm seriously thinking about buying the Trek 7500fx (based on online reviews and comments from cycling friends), and I'd like to know how much it weighs. I'm curious in general, and I'd also like to know how it compares to road bikes so I know how much I'm giving up for a hybrid vs road bike. The Trek site doesn't say, and I haven't been able to find the information elsewhere. Why is this data not available on the Trek site? Because there are various configurations?

Any help very much appreciated. Thanks.
What you give up is having the multiple hand positions that come with drop bars. Drops become more useful the longer your rides get, the more varied the terrain, and the more wind you must face. As far as weight is concerned, at that price range a "real" road bike won't be any lighter.

If you're a heavier rider, you might want to consider trading for some sturdier wheels.
halfspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 08:19 AM   #5
merlinny
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the replies everyone. I did end up going with the 7500fx. I think it will be the right balance for me between performance and comfort.

For what it's worth, I did find on the Trek site a weight spec for the 2002 model 7500fx, which was 25 lbs. But there's no weight information for more recent models, including the current model. The guy at Metro bikes didn't know the weight either, and nothing in the material I was given mentions it. Maybe the weight isn't all that important, but I still find it odd that it isn't included at all in the specs. It's at least as important, I would have thought, as some of the other items that are included.

Thanks again.
merlinny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 08:40 AM   #6
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Bikes: Rans Rockst (Retro rocket) Rans Enduro Sport (Retro racket) Catrike 559, Merin Bear Valley (beater bike).
Posts: 26,734
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Every bike has three weights: what the manufacturer says that it weighs, what the owner thinks that it weighs, and what my scale says that it weighs. If weight is an important factor to you, weigh all of the bikes that you are considering on the same scale. Make sure that they have pedals and are otherwise ready to ride. That's the only way you will ever cut through the BS.
Retro Grouch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 01:09 PM   #7
JJakucyk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Cincinnati
Bikes: Trek 7100 Hybrid
Posts: 404
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a Trek 7100 and I just today bought a new Klein rÍve V road bike. I was curious to know how much it weighed, and they put it on a scale and it read 20.4 lbs. I wanted to know how that compared to my existing bike, and the closest thing they had was a Trek 7500. I'm not sure if it was an FX or not, but it had the full front suspension forks. That weighed in at 30.5 lbs.

That being said, 30 lbs isn't bad for a hybrid. Some of these cheap Huffy mountain bikes, or cruisers, can be near 50 lbs! I never felt particularly held back by my 7100, and it's a comfortable ride. I think you'll like your 7500.
JJakucyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-05, 09:45 PM   #8
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinny
Thanks for the replies everyone. I did end up going with the 7500fx. I think it will be the right balance for me between performance and comfort.

For what it's worth, I did find on the Trek site a weight spec for the 2002 model 7500fx, which was 25 lbs. But there's no weight information for more recent models, including the current model. The guy at Metro bikes didn't know the weight either, and nothing in the material I was given mentions it. Maybe the weight isn't all that important, but I still find it odd that it isn't included at all in the specs. It's at least as important, I would have thought, as some of the other items that are included.

Thanks again.
You bought a nice bike. Don't worry about the weight.

Honest bike companies do NOT like to print weight specs. The weight of the bike depends on the size of the frame, the size and model of tire, the saddle selected, and the pedals selected. Companies that "brag" about ultra-low weights are seldom using their LARGEST frame, and the most popular choices of tires, saddles and pedals. Heck, most catalog weights are based on NO pedals.

The first thing I do when I buy a new bike is to add padded gel bar tape, a wider saddle, BMX pedals, and lots of reflectors and strobe lights, front and back. Then, I add thicker inner tubes and wider tires. I can easily add five pounds of weight while setting up a bike to be safe, comfortable, and reliable, rather than "light".
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-05, 01:01 AM   #9
slotibartfast
Duct tape won't fix that
 
slotibartfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Covington, Washington
Bikes: 2003 Bianchi Veloce, 2002 Gary Fisher Utopia
Posts: 440
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
You've got a good bike there, enjoy it. I have the similar Gary Fisher model, the Utopia, and the thing is pretty much bomb proof. I find that I give up 2-4 mph between the Utopia and my road bike. Halfspeed's comment on flat bars vs. drop bars are right on the money. My hands are definitely more comfortable on longer rides using the drops rather than the straight bar. If you find that you have some trouble with numbness, be sure that your wrists are straight - if you tend to bend them downwards, numbness will result. Also, try moving your hands near the stem from time to time - that at least gives you another hand position to use.

Enjoy your riding and don't worry about weight, worry about the engine!
slotibartfast is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:20 PM.