Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-24-12, 02:52 AM   #1
patp
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
lower back pain... what kind of bike/posture is best?

Hi,

I have long standing lower back pain due to a disc herniation. Currently revisiting physio to improve core stability and aiming to avoid surgery. I want to start daily cycling to stay fit, and I want to make sure I get the right king of bike. My impression is that an upright posture would be best, but I can't find any professional advice about it. does anyone know of resources or services that could help me get this right?
patp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-12, 06:21 AM   #2
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,052
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by patp View Post
Hi,

I have long standing lower back pain due to a disc herniation. Currently revisiting physio to improve core stability and aiming to avoid surgery. I want to start daily cycling to stay fit, and I want to make sure I get the right king of bike. My impression is that an upright posture would be best, but I can't find any professional advice about it. does anyone know of resources or services that could help me get this right?
sitting bolt upright on a 'comfort bike' will do very little to improve core strength
additionally this posture will send all shock forces from the road straight up your spine
leaning forward with arms taking up more of your weight is better
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-12, 08:00 AM   #3
Looigi
Senior Member
 
Looigi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 8,942
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A lot depends on the individual; physiology, spinal issues, fitness and conditioning. It takes a fair amount of riding for your body to fully adapt to it. The thing is to progress gradually and incrementally so as not to injure yourself. That said, for me, lower is better. My bars are 10cm below the height of my saddle. My wife found lower was better too. We're both ~60 and in pretty good shape. When I see people sitting upright on bikes, it gives me the willies.
Looigi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-12, 08:14 AM   #4
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Bikes: My beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and my 2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO Hi-Mod
Posts: 16,103
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by xenologer View Post
sitting bolt upright on a 'comfort bike' will do very little to improve core strength
additionally this posture will send all shock forces from the road straight up your spine
leaning forward with arms taking up more of your weight is better
+! on core strength.
Add exercises to strengthen your core and your back problems may go away.
__________________


The LORD is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy. - Psalm 103:8
RonH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-12, 08:27 AM   #5
Phil_gretz
Bike Commuter in training
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Bikes: '88 Fuji Saratoga, '12 Jamis Sputnik, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite
Posts: 3,774
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
I had L4/L5 fusion in July of 2008. This type of question doesn't lend itself to internet discussions. Have you gone over your MRIs and X-rays with your exercise physiologist or your [potiental] surgeon and therapist together? You need exercises that are correctly matched to your particular weakness.

My surgeon (at the time) didn't encourage me to ride my somewhat upright mountain bike as much. Now many years later, I don't have any restrictions. But I wouldn't begin running distances for fitness. Like the others, post-surgery, I've found that the stretched out road bike position is most comfortable.

Work with people who know your medical/structural details, are active in your current therapies, and also know something about orthopedics and strenuous exercise. That's where your most informed decisions will be made...

Phil
Phil_gretz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:56 AM.