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  1. #1
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Pedro's Tülio*QR Skewer Multi-Tool revisited

    Pedro's Tülio QR Skewer Multi-Tool

    http://www.pedros.com/tulio.htm

    So to prep up the steel framed Giant for winter service, I had to swap out a wheel-set and then re-adjust the brakes; check the brake lever and shifter mounting screws for tightness; check the stem and bar mounting screws; seat hardware, seat post clamp, bottle cage and rack mounting screws; check the front and rear derailleur mounting tension; check the chainring bolts AND install a new chain and chain pin.

    All of this was intentionally done with a Pedro's Tülio, which, interestingly enough, was equipped with the specific hex key sizes required to do the job, as well as a chain tool and slot screwdriver for setting limit screws. Part of my confirmation that I can travel light with this and still have enough to look after unexpected or expected maintenance.

    This particular Tülio has also been deliberately exposed to rain and road dirt for several months now without special attention and I was expecting some corrosion issues. Even those after-market locking skewers have corrosion issues.
    Zero. Zip. Nada. Zilch.
    Which is why its now riding on the rear wheel of the winter bike. If it deals as successfully with salt - any reservations I had about it being 'exposed' will be completely groundless. And I'll pick up a *couple more for a few other bikes!

    This bike's wheel-set is equipped with Nokian 240 carbide studded tires and Michlin Protek Max Inner Tubes. I won't be carrying spare tubes. http://www.michelinbicycletire.com/m...protekmax.view

    Some things about progress I like!
    Last edited by Burton; 12-13-12 at 08:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the review, looks interesting. I am in the market for a multitool at the moment, will definitely add this to the comparison list.

  3. #3
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    Yes, that's a unique item I've not seen before. Clever design!

    I'm not sure it really solves any issues I have, but I give Pedros credit for coming up with a novel concept!
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    How hard is it to orient the tool to get at the fasteners that you need? Will it work for installing a water bottle cage?

  5. #5
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    How hard is it to orient the tool to get at the fasteners that you need? Will it work for installing a water bottle cage?
    It depends. I would have mo problems but my cage fasteners are 4mm so it just takes the 4mm / blade screwdriver item which is the first piece out anyway. At that point its like using an offset driver - pretty straight forward.
    There are a few cage designs that are problamatic by design with anything short of a 12" T driver and if you have 5mm bolts installed its a little tighter access because you need to use the larger tool piece.
    In most cases bottle cage fasteners can be started by hand anyway do its only the last turn that a tool is needed for.
    Last edited by Burton; 12-14-12 at 03:39 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Thanks for the review of this item! I've been curious about it, particularly for touring.
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  7. #7
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
    Yes, that's a unique item I've not seen before. Clever design!

    I'm not sure it really solves any issues I have, but I give Pedros credit for coming up with a novel concept!
    I own and have owned a variety of multi-tools oncluding the Park Rescue Multi Tool - MTB-3C. My issue with most of them is that they attempt to cover so many bases that the average person will never use most of the items. So they're bigger than necessary and less practical than possible.

    I've carried these in pockets, seat bags, saddlebags and ocassionally - forgotten to bring them. So this one has the advantage of living on the bike and covering all the essential bases. I should mention that there are nothing but hex fasteners on this particular bike - the rack hardware was originally Phillips head and was replaced.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    I own and have owned a variety of multi-tools oncluding the Park Rescue Multi Tool - MTB-3C. My issue with most of them is that they attempt to cover so many bases that the average person will never use most of the items. So they're bigger than necessary and less practical than possible.

    I've carried these in pockets, seat bags, saddlebags and ocassionally - forgotten to bring them. So this one has the advantage of living on the bike and covering all the essential bases. I should mention that there are nothing but hex fasteners on this particular bike - the rack hardware was originally Phillips head and was replaced.
    I certainly agree that the trend of recent years has been towards bigger and more comprehensive multitools. I'd add increasingly awkward and miniaturized, too.

    I was fortunate to have found a tool many years ago that I thought-- and still believe-- is the ideal multitool, the Ritchey CPR 14. I stocked up on a trio, covering the two saddlebag equipped bikes I had, and leaving me a spare. As my stable grew over the years, I tried a few multi-tools, mostly staying in the lightweight vein with the Ritchey CPR9 (the 14 went out of production a long time ago), and the Park MT1, but also including a gifted Topeak gizmo that weighed a ton and had integrated, snap on tire levers.

    What I've come to realize, like you, is that more is not better. Maybe I've been blessed (or insightful) but since I took to the road and trails in the mid- and late '80s, my bikes have become increasingly reliable and increasingly uniform in terms of fasteners, such that whereas the whiz-bang Topeak gizmo would have been handy in '88 when I was snapping chains, blowing out shifters, and my ad hoc assemblage of road and MTB parts for trail riding had a dozen different fasteners, I've used nary a tool other than an allen wrench in the last decade. Bikes have gotten "smarter" too, such that nowadays pedals can be tightened with an allen or a pedal wrench, headsets only use allens, and stuff like that.

    On long road rides and trail rides I still do want to carry the tools to cover the most likely eventualities, but I want the tools I use most in the most handy and usable format. I hate rifling through a set of fold-outs looking for the right size or having to unsnap three other pieces to get to it. Ergonomics is what I'm talking about, and most multitools drag the concept through the mud. Ergo, I like to stick to the simple stuff.

    That's why I like, basically, the design of this Tulio; it's simple. Personally, I always have a saddle bag with a full kit on each bike, so I'm never-- er, rarely-- without my tools. Anyway, I like my fancy, colorfully anodized wheel skewers!
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

  9. #9
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by THE ARS View Post
    Interesting, for sure, but I'd be worried about someone stealing that and leaving me a long walk home.

    Tom
    I guess that could be a risk. It's actually very easy to just take the tool off the QR skewer if anyone's that worried. Personally I'd think on my particular bike the Mavic 719 wheelset and XT derailleurs and levers would be a bigger risk - so it gets parked inside regardless.

  10. #10
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    So after riding a couple months in salt and snow including some of the worst winter storms seen in 30 years - I'm pleased to say that this baby looks just about like new.
    And maybe just a tinsy wiensy bit annoyed that I've never actually needed to use it!

    Which is probably a good recomendation for doing preventative maintenaince ahead of time more than anything to do with this particular tool - although I'm pretty sure if I took it off something would need adjusting almost immediately

    So - will be ordering another for the sweetie's bike!

  11. #11
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Some things come and go. I have lots of gagets in the drawer but this Tulio has kinda grown on me - its just annoyingly small and convenient!

    Thing is - the latest builds I've been putting together have solid axles so - what to do with that QR Tulio????????
    I actually ended up detaching it from the rear wheel QR skewer and replacing the QR handle on a Topeak Defender rear fender with the Tulio. Cool!

  12. #12
    Senior Member TromboneAl's Avatar
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    I appreciate the cleverness of the idea, but here's how I see it:

    1. You save the weight of the normal quick-release lever. (not a big deal)
    2. You "NEVER FORGET YOUR MULTITOOL AGAIN" (never happens to me)
    3. You pay more than for a normal multitool.

    I'd rather just have my multitool in my seat pack.
    My Book: Drive, Ride, Repeat: The Mostly-True Account of a Cross-Country Car and Bicycle Adventure

  13. #13
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
    I appreciate the cleverness of the idea, but here's how I see it:

    1. You save the weight of the normal quick-release lever. (not a big deal)
    2. You "NEVER FORGET YOUR MULTITOOL AGAIN" (never happens to me)
    3. You pay more than for a normal multitool.

    I'd rather just have my multitool in my seat pack.
    Seatpack? What seatpack?

    4. I saved the weight and cost of a seatpack too!

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