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Old 05-08-02, 07:53 PM   #1
ed gavin
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Advice for a newbie

I'm new to all this and I'm looking to purchase a new bike but need some help for someone with a lot more knowledge when it comes to which bike is better for the money. I was looking at these three bikes in MY price range:

Trek 7500FX, Specialized Sirrus A1 Sport, Fuji Silouette

Can anyone give me any advice?

Thanks

ed
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Old 05-09-02, 07:55 AM   #2
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Ed,
I have not ridden any of these bikes so I can't really offer any comparison. My primary LBS carries Specialized so I have seen the Sirrus and consider it a very nice bike. My LBS buddies are pretty high on it. For one thing it is very close to a true road bike except for the flat bar. All of the bikes you mention are good bikes and any of them will serve you well for years. The main things is to get one that fits. Hopefully your LBS can help you with that.
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Old 05-09-02, 08:30 AM   #3
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Everyone and their moma rides a Trek. Not sure what your price range is but try to find a Jamis dealer in your area. Those bikes are a bargain for what you get and what you pay for.
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Old 05-09-02, 12:48 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally posted by Spinarooni
try to find a Jamis dealer in your area. Those bikes are a bargain for what you get and what you pay for.
From what I have seen of Jamis, I tend to agree.
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Old 05-14-02, 08:09 PM   #5
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Ed, I'm also looking into these types of bikes (somewhere between a road bike and a mt. bike). I was looking at these....what do you think of them?

Specialized Sirrus

Specialized Sirrus Sport

Jamis Coda

Jamis Nova

Jamis Aurora

Let me know what you think. I really need help and can't decide myself.

Can someone please look at the specs and tell me which one has good quality components. Thx.
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Old 05-14-02, 08:26 PM   #6
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Cadd...

They're all rather different bikes, actually. The Sirruses and the Coda are probably the most similar -- essentially hybrids, though the Sirrus really ahs more of a roadie geometry and spec. The Aurora is a low-end road/sport-touring bike, and the Nova is a cyclocross bike with touring bike manners. Of the bunch of them, I like the Nova the best, but thst's just because I like cyclocross bikes [for cyclocross] and drop handlebars.
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Old 05-14-02, 08:36 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by velocipedio
Cadd...

They're all rather different bikes, actually. The Sirruses and the Coda are probably the most similar -- essentially hybrids, though the Sirrus really ahs more of a roadie geometry and spec. The Aurora is a low-end road/sport-touring bike, and the Nova is a cyclocross bike with touring bike manners. Of the bunch of them, I like the Nova the best, but thst's just because I like cyclocross bikes [for cyclocross] and drop handlebars.
Velo, would you know what a good price for the Nova would be? Would the Nova be good for city riding? Would any of the bikes I've mentioned good for city riding (ie. curbs, potholes, etc.)?
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Old 05-14-02, 09:41 PM   #8
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I imagine Nova would be just fine for city riding. I've been finding that I tend to use my 'cross bike as my ride of choice to my office [a short ride, but nonetheless...] I don't know what kind of tires it comes with, but if it comes with knobbies, there's no reason why you couldn't just swap out for semi-slicks or 28c slick tires.

In fact, all of the bikes you listed would be just fine for city riding.

I personally like the Nova because I have a preference for drop handlebars, I think it has a better copmponents and frame spec than the other two Jamis bikes.

The other thing is that I think it may ultimately be more adaptable in some ways... you could use it as a road bike or as a cyclocross bike [which is what it's kind of intended for, anyway], if you start getting into the sport of cycling in a big way.

But that's how I look at it. I'm not you.

You should go to the shop, try all the bikes -- or as many as you can -- and get the one that sings to you. It should fit, be comfortable and make you want to ride forever. Chosing a bike is a complex and personal thing. You have to make the decision and you can only do that by trying the bikes.
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Old 05-15-02, 06:37 PM   #9
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Jamis Coda is a great value. I've modified mine a bit...Brooks b17 saddle, 28c smooth tires, bar end handles for different hand position.

I'm thinking about converting to drop handlebar with bar cons.

Ted Ingraham
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Old 05-15-02, 07:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by velocipedio
I imagine Nova would be just fine for city riding. I've been finding that I tend to use my 'cross bike as my ride of choice to my office [a short ride, but nonetheless...] I don't know what kind of tires it comes with, but if it comes with knobbies, there's no reason why you couldn't just swap out for semi-slicks or 28c slick tires.

In fact, all of the bikes you listed would be just fine for city riding.

I personally like the Nova because I have a preference for drop handlebars, I think it has a better copmponents and frame spec than the other two Jamis bikes.

The other thing is that I think it may ultimately be more adaptable in some ways... you could use it as a road bike or as a cyclocross bike [which is what it's kind of intended for, anyway], if you start getting into the sport of cycling in a big way.

But that's how I look at it. I'm not you.

You should go to the shop, try all the bikes -- or as many as you can -- and get the one that sings to you. It should fit, be comfortable and make you want to ride forever. Chosing a bike is a complex and personal thing. You have to make the decision and you can only do that by trying the bikes.
Velo, how about the Bianchi Volpe...it know it's a bit more than what I was looking to spend, but I need those 35c tires for the city...I think I'm just paranoid....but is the Volpe a good bike? It msrp for $850.

Thanx
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Old 05-15-02, 08:00 PM   #11
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If it is your first adult bike, it should be a Schwinn Varsity - or if you can get the extra cash, make it a Schwinn Continental.

You won't regret it!:fun:
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Old 05-15-02, 08:17 PM   #12
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"My first bike" meaning a non toys r us/wal-mart bike. I try to do a search on the two bikes you mentioned but came up with nothing....I guess they're classics huh?
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Old 05-15-02, 08:39 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally posted by mike
If it is your first adult bike, it should be a Schwinn Varsity - or if you can get the extra cash, make it a Schwinn Continental.

You won't regret it!:fun:
Speaking of classic bikes, does anyone remember the Huffy Santa Fe? It was a "fine ride," well until when the front brakes fell off mine, got stuck in the front spokes and sent me face first on to the pavement. Ouch.

Anywho.. I'd like to thank everyone for their input, I'll still confused as ever but thanks. It's nice to belong to a forum where everyone is so willing to help.

later,

ed
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Old 05-15-02, 09:56 PM   #14
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Anywho.. I'd like to thank everyone for their input, I'll still confused as ever but thanks. It's nice to belong to a forum where everyone is so willing to help.

later,

ed
Ed, where are you located? Hey, we can test ride together if you're in the NY area....it'll be better for 2 "I have no clue about bike guys" to test ride than to go alone.

...the search continues...
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Old 05-16-02, 06:57 AM   #15
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Sorry I'm down here in a little place called Parrish FL, on the west coast of Florida somewhere between Tampa and Sarasota.

Actually I started riding in NY (Westchester county area) oh how I miss those hills, it's very flat here.

Good luck on your search, I think I'm going looking again today. My biggest problem is I ask myself "how much bike do I really need?" I've been riding the same old Fuji MX 450 that I paid $250 for almost six years ago and can still knock out 20-30 miles. It may not sound like much but that's as much time as I can really invest at one time.

Yes I need a new bike but I like just to go out there and sweat, clear my mind, have a little fun. I'm not out there to win any races. So how many bells and whistles do I really need? I don't own a jersey or bike pants, hell I don't even wear a helmet.

I'm done venting now.

ed
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Old 05-16-02, 07:47 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cadd
Velo, how about the Bianchi Volpe...it know it's a bit more than what I was looking to spend, but I need those 35c tires for the city...I think I'm just paranoid....but is the Volpe a good bike? It msrp for $850.
I don't know too much about the Volpe. There's a Bianchi dealer about 10 km from my house, and if I go by there, I'll look in.

Having said that, the bike has a nice spec for the price range. The frame is Reynolds 520 steel, which is reliable and good quality, if not terribly exciting cro-mo. The Tiagra group is solid and efficient. In terms of geometry, it's really more of a touring bike than anything else. And it is a Bianchi, which is a marque with an excellent reputation for quality bikes.

That's about all I can say without having actually seen the bike. On paper, I like the Jamis Nova a little better because of the frame material and geometry, but those are my preferences. You really should go and look at and TRY both bikes. You can no more buy a bike by spec than you can get a date by spec.
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Old 05-17-02, 11:42 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by velocipedio
The other thing is that I think it may ultimately be more adaptable in some ways... you could use it as a road bike or as a cyclocross bike [which is what it's kind of intended for, anyway], if you start getting into the sport of cycling in a big way.
velocipedio, How does a cyclocross bike differ from touring and road bikes. Components, geometry, or both?

Ted
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Old 05-17-02, 12:02 PM   #18
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Quote:
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velocipedio, How does a cyclocross bike differ from touring and road bikes. Components, geometry, or both?
Both...

I recently discussed it in this thread... just look at the last post.
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