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Old 01-05-13, 10:02 AM   #1
Heiko
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Quick release on a freewheel?

G'day everyone!

I hope I've reached the correct section of this forum. I'd like to ask a quick question before I head out to buy some used 700c wheels tonight. Since they are sold on a listing and the seller isn't really able to tell himself whether the back hub is a freewheel or a freehub, then I'd ask you guys.





Since the images aren't the best, I'm not able to tell myself either. Have you ever seen a quick release skew on a freewheel or are they only common to freehubs? I've had bad experience with freewheels (especially bent axles) before so I'd rather not fall for them again.

Awaiting for your opinions. Thanks!
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Old 01-05-13, 10:09 AM   #2
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I can't tell anything about the cassette from these pictures.

How many cogs are there?

As to a QR on freewheels, yes, I had freewheels with QR.

But the chances are that you have a freehub with those wheels...
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Old 01-05-13, 10:10 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heiko View Post
G'day everyone!

I hope I've reached the correct section of this forum. I'd like to ask a quick question before I head out to buy some used 700c wheels tonight. Since they are sold on a listing and the seller isn't really able to tell himself whether the back hub is a freewheel or a freehub, then I'd ask you guys.


Since the images aren't the best, I'm not able to tell myself either. Have you ever seen a quick release skew on a freewheel or are they only common to freehubs? I've had bad experience with freewheels (especially bent axles) before so I'd rather not fall for them again.

Awaiting for your opinions. Thanks!
Heiko
Yes they are very common on freewheel hubs. To determine if the hub is a freewheel or freehub, look at the hubs and see if there is a lock ring that is flush with the top of the cassette. If there is a recess around the top of the cassette, it's freewheel hub. If the smallest cog is an 11, it's probably a cassette as well.
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Old 01-05-13, 10:14 AM   #4
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Thanks for the early reply ahsposo! I was thinking of a freehub as well because of the rim design.
Thank you cyccommute for pointing that out as well. In real life I can often differ a freehub from a freewheel, but as I'm yet to see these wheels, I'm not sure myself.

Also, does it look like a Presta valve from the picture or not?
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Old 01-05-13, 10:59 AM   #5
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The presence of a QR has nothing at all to do with whether it's a freewheel or freehub.

As far as the valve is concerned, I don't think there's a chance in the world of telling from those pictures.
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Old 01-05-13, 11:47 AM   #6
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Learn how to spot the difference before you get there ,
nobody can help you, remotely..
since you did not offer a closeup of the end of the hub where the gear cluster is.


Historical
Freewheel hubs were QR before the freehub design took over a large segment of the market.

but they are still made, and wheels still built around them..

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-05-13 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 01-06-13, 07:13 AM   #7
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Thanks for all the help, guys!
When I finally got there in the morning I realised that only the front wheel had a quick release skew. The back wheel has a Shimano MF-HG37 freewheel and nuts at the end of the axle. But since they seemed to be in great condition (considering they were straight and had pretty much no wear on the tires!) and were only 25 EUR (33 USD) I decided to give them a try. I can always replace the rear hub for a freehub if needed, right? At least I have some pretty narrow rims now (with the outside width of 19 mm).

I hope the resolution of the images won't be a problem.






On the other hand I could have had a set of Shimano WH-R 550 (although I've read some pretty nasty reviews on them) with a 10-speed cassette for 20 EUR, but I would have had to buy a new chain, new tubes and new tires.
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Old 01-06-13, 10:06 AM   #8
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BTW, it's a skewer, not a skew, which is a verb.
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Old 01-06-13, 02:50 PM   #9
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A 10-speed wheel has an axle width of 130mm, while your 7-speed wheel is probably 126mm. What kind of bike do you have?

Be advised that "replacing the rear hub" will mean rebuilding the wheel around an entirely new hub.
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Old 01-06-13, 10:06 PM   #10
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You may be able to replace the rear solid axle with a hollow one if you really want quick release.
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Old 01-06-13, 10:51 PM   #11
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Sorry for the grammar, CraigB, I'll do better next time!

I have a pretty old frame with "Sarda Eldorado" on it. Yes, I know it's equal to (or is it?) a Walmart bicycle, but since it seems to be the right size frame for me, I thought I'd give it a chance by adding drop handlebars, new wheels, repaint (soon) and so on. It doesn't have a marketable form as of yet, so I'd rather not post any pictures.
Yes, I'm fully aware of that but I'm willing to try.

Nah, quick release isn't my main concern, but is it a good idea for a freewheel anyway? It would tolerate less stress, or not?

Also, I'd like to ask for some advice on the brakes. As you can see on the first picture, then there's some more space needed for a correct brake pad position. On the other picture you can see that there's some free space I could extend the brake connector into. What do you think? Would it be better than buying a 35 USD brake adapter (which I haven't seen anywhere locally anyway)?





Yes, it's rusty, but it's in the progress of being restored.

Last edited by Heiko; 01-06-13 at 11:06 PM. Reason: Added a question about brake levers.
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Old 01-07-13, 03:47 AM   #12
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Sorry for the grammar, CraigB, I'll do better next time!

I have a pretty old frame with "Sarda Eldorado" on it. Yes, I know it's equal to (or is it?) a Walmart bicycle, but since it seems to be the right size frame for me, I thought I'd give it a chance by adding drop handlebars, new wheels, repaint (soon) and so on. It doesn't have a marketable form as of yet, so I'd rather not post any pictures.
Yes, I'm fully aware of that but I'm willing to try.

Nah, quick release isn't my main concern, but is it a good idea for a freewheel anyway? It would tolerate less stress, or not?

Also, I'd like to ask for some advice on the brakes. As you can see on the first picture, then there's some more space needed for a correct brake pad position. On the other picture you can see that there's some free space I could extend the brake connector into. What do you think? Would it be better than buying a 35 USD brake adapter (which I haven't seen anywhere locally anyway)?





Yes, it's rusty, but it's in the progress of being restored.
I think, your bike is an old English department store bike; as such it most likely is meant to use 26 x 1 3/8 (iso 590) wheels; not 700c (iso 622) wheels. As such you really need to get the correct size wheels.

it is of course possible to have a frame builder move the brake studs, or get lucky and find an esoteric adaptor; but given the likely value of a department store bike this does not make economical sense....


P.S. I saw the photos of your current brake/rim distance mismatch earlier... but the links seem to have gone missing?

Last edited by xenologer; 01-07-13 at 03:52 AM.
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Old 01-07-13, 05:20 AM   #13
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Thanks for the input xenologer! I'm fully aware of all the problems that come with a different rim size. I had 26" wheels before but since I couldn't find narrow 26" tires and I like the look of 28" rims anyway, I thought I'd give it a try despite the fact that it isn't the perfect setup.
As I'm on my phone and at school at the moment, so I can't express my idea any further.

The images from my last post work fine for me.

Now here's my idea to drill a hole into the already existing gap (which shouldn't make the overall structure much weaker).


Last edited by Heiko; 01-07-13 at 07:38 AM. Reason: Added more information on brakes.
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Old 01-07-13, 09:36 AM   #14
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If you're set on doing the conversion...
I think you should buy the adaptors to remount the brakes higher; as opposed to drilling the arms.
For one, brakes are a critical safety device; and as we are not materials scientists I wouldn't want to risk any assumptions on just how much material can be safely removed.
Secondly, even if you did sucessfully drill the arms, having the pads mounted farther away from the pivots will effectively reduce the leverage of the brakes -you won't stop as well.

Yeah, adaptor is probably the best approach for both safety and performance....
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Old 01-07-13, 10:27 AM   #15
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I call it too late for them, at least for this set of brakes. When I'm able to find an adapter, they'll go.



The bicycle and the brake pads should actually go the other way around.

Next up should be rear brakes, get rid of the wheel lock at the back, mount gear switchers on the stem (because none of the frame tubes are actually round) or leave them and add cable housing instead and finally repaint the whole frame (maybe matte black?). As an extra I'd change the seat, drill-and-weld-nuts for a second bottle holder and hear your opinions on everything as well. Oh, and fix the whole cabling mess for the lights already (2+1 in front and right now only one at the back) to make it less visible (8V 3.2Ah battery in the bag with cables running from there).



As a side note, I'm not looking for any expensive or unneeded modifications, but just to keep everything simple and practical. It would be my daily commuter for school on 2 kilometers of gravel and another 18 on "highway". Then all the way back.
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Old 01-07-13, 03:45 PM   #16
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Top image in #7 is a common shimano freewheel.. my guess its a 10x1 tpmm axle in the hub.
I expect you can go to your favorite bike shop, and they can substitute a hollow axle
of appropriate length, and QR skewer, for you for a reasonable charge..


To the wheel change follies ? stick with the wheel the frame was made for , want 700c,
you have the wrong frame.. accept the fact that you need the frame for those wheels..

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-08-13 at 03:02 AM.
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Old 01-07-13, 08:43 PM   #17
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You can probably buy an old frame for 700C wheels for cheaper than you could get the adapters or a set of cantis that will adjust far enough, or have frame work done. Of course, if you get another frame, then the seat post probably won't fit, you'll need a different headset, stem, bb??? So far it looks to me that you're trying to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear and wasting a bit of money in the process. Stop now while you still can!
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Old 01-07-13, 10:36 PM   #18
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The modified brakes seem to provide a little less friction as xenologer suggester, but nothing too dramatic, since I managed to stop on my test ride just fine - just flipping over the handlebars would need some extra help now. I know it's not the best idea that I'm up to, but hey, let's see how it turns out. And by the way I haven't seen any used 700c frames for a reasonable price around here. I must remind you that I don't live somewhere with an active bicycle culture.

However, as I was regreasing the hubs yesterday evening I came across an interesting thing. The back hub had 9 bearings on each side and everything seemed to be nice, but it looked like the front hub had one bearing missing on both sides as there was enough space for one more. Is this normal or should I be concerned? I've never seen anything like this before. I forgot to picture it, but you should get what I mean.
The old grease itself had hardened enough to form a gump at the bottom of the cone and everything had minimal wear compared to some of my previous wheels, so I guess these haven't been used much.

Last edited by Heiko; 01-08-13 at 02:30 AM.
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Old 01-08-13, 05:24 AM   #19
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The modified brakes seem to provide a little less friction as xenologer suggester, but nothing too dramatic, since I managed to stop on my test ride just fine - just flipping over the handlebars would need some extra help now. I know it's not the best idea that I'm up to, but hey, let's see how it turns out. And by the way I haven't seen any used 700c frames for a reasonable price around here. I must remind you that I don't live somewhere with an active bicycle culture.

However, as I was regreasing the hubs yesterday evening I came across an interesting thing. The back hub had 9 bearings on each side and everything seemed to be nice, but it looked like the front hub had one bearing missing on both sides as there was enough space for one more. Is this normal or should I be concerned? I've never seen anything like this before. I forgot to picture it, but you should get what I mean.
The old grease itself had hardened enough to form a gump at the bottom of the cone and everything had minimal wear compared to some of my previous wheels, so I guess these haven't been used much.
There should be a space for one more bearing, you don't want them jammed in their tight.

Aaron
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Old 01-08-13, 05:59 AM   #20
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Thanks Aaron! On all of my previous 26" wheels I've seen a full round of bearings, either caged or loose. But if you say it's alright then I won't worry.
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Old 01-09-13, 05:31 AM   #21
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Thanks Aaron! On all of my previous 26" wheels I've seen a full round of bearings, either caged or loose. But if you say it's alright then I won't worry.
The way I was taught back in the day was to fill the races as tight as I could with bearings then remove one. Caged bearings are what they are...

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