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Old 02-06-05, 07:25 AM   #1
phantomcow2
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ugh, a matter of funds and priorities.

Well...heres my problem. I really like cycling, road and mountain. I currently own i nice mountain bike i have saved and saved for. Im only in highschool i dont have a heck of a lot of cash, i made some pretty amazing deals on ebay with this thing. Usually on the weekends when its spring, summer, or fall i go riding out on the trail. Becuase to get to the trail its 5-6 miles away depending on where i go just to get there is why, i dont have time to do that after school. So i find to make up for this i ride on the road, and now that i realize it i only use this mountain bike like a mountain bike should once a week, and sometimes i dont have time so i have to skip it . But i use it like a road bike just about every day, i commute to school, i ride for the heck of it after another 8 or so miles. And of course i go to the Coffee shop to get tasty foods. I would buy a road bike but again, im in highschool...i cant afford it right now. ANd it would take me forever to save up. So the idea came that i could sell my MTB for a road bike but i dont know. I know i would get a heck of a lot more use out of it, and i like to go fast i find. My 44T up front dont always allow this. But i dont know, i like my MTB a lot, i just dont feel like i give it enough use as an MTB. But it seems like road bikes are so different in their internals. ANy comments here? Suggestions?
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Old 02-06-05, 08:19 AM   #2
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You can set up most good bikes to work in most situations. My older road bikes take size 28 and 32 tires, and provide good riding on dirt "mountain bike" trails that are in reasonably good condition. And, my mountain bike works great on pavement with light "slick" tires.

The bike messengers in downtown Houston use every kind of bike there is. But, among the more experienced messengers, a popular bike is a mountain bike with slick tires. They can take the beating that pot-holes and curbs dish out. The wheels are strong and remain true. The fatter tires provide a good cushion to protect the rider from road shock.

The road bike, circa 2005 is NOT anything like the road bikes of 1985. In the old days, most road bikes were designed to handle any sort road, included dirt, or gravel, and to be tough enough to support both a rider and fifty pounds of gear.

In 2005, the "Be Like Lance" marketing game has turned most "modern" road bikes into "pretend" racing bikes. A "pretend" racing bike will come with size 23 tires, and have short chainstays and a short wheelbase "Just like Lance rides". The stems are three or four inches lower than the saddle, forcing your weight forward onto your hands.

All of these "racing" features makes them the WORST sort of bike for the urban rider who DOES not race. The skinny tires and short wheelbase don't absorb shock well. Urban potholes break spokes and put the wheels out of true. No room for large saddlebags to carry school books, computers, a large sack of groceries, or a case of beer...some of the basic requirements of civilized life.

So, stick with your mountain bike. Put on slick tires. Put on bar ends to get another hand position. Enjoy the bike you already have.

When you get ready for another bike, look for a 1985ish touring bike. A, wide, strong 40 spoke rim in back. Designed for fat tires. Room for saddlebags both front and back for long summer tours (or trips to Krogers). The long chainstays and long wheelbase shock up road shock. A road bike designed for real roads and real riders. Usually available for under $200 or so.
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Old 02-06-05, 08:59 AM   #3
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If it's only eight miles or so, then your best bet would be to get some slicks (around 1.5s) for your mountain bike. This still leaves you the option of going off-roading by simply swapping the dirt tires back on.

If you're under-geared you can replace the chainrings. I've got a Shimano Deore chainset with 48/36/26 for about fifty bucks which works great on my grocery-getter.
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Old 02-06-05, 09:02 AM   #4
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Well its 6 miles to and from school and then usually 8-10 more/day for fun. I would like to have higher gears but thing is my cranks are 4 bolt rather than 5. It seems that there is no such thing as 4 bolt larger than 44T
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Old 02-06-05, 09:06 AM   #5
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Alright its decided, i am not selling my MTB. I want to ride XC even if its only every weekend. If i cant find a larger geared chainring for 4 bolt, at least 48T, then i replace the crankset. Thanks all
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Old 02-06-05, 12:37 PM   #6
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There's also the option of getting a cheap road bike second hand. I found mine for ten bucks. Granted I've put a bit of money upgrading componets on it, but if its just for commuting you can get away with finding an older cheap road bike, leaving it stock, just cleaning it up and putting a little work into it.
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Old 02-06-05, 02:52 PM   #7
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I agree with junior, put the buzz in the local bike shops ear about you wanting a used bike. I'm sure they hear at least once or twice a week about someone buying a new bike and having an old one to get rid of.
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Old 02-06-05, 05:20 PM   #8
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thats what I am doing.I have my mtn bike for when I go camping or riding with the family.then I have a very old road bike that I am fixing up to ride when I am by myself.that way I can get the speed up to where I want and enjoy it for the ride.(not that I don't enjoy my rides with my family.)I can go farther and faster by myself that with the family.it is not the greatest old bike but it's paid for.keep the mtn bike.put some slick tires on it.I did and it really changed the way the bike rode.
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