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  1. #1
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    Sprung & Padded Saddle with Long Rails All the Way to the Nose?

    I need to set my saddle back about 2 inches so my knees will go over the pedals properly.

    My current comfort saddle has less than an inch available on the rails:

    http://www.avenirusa.com/parts-and-a...s-saddle.html

    So I'm wondering if a sprung/padded saddle exists that has rails that go close to the nose like some racing saddles do?

    As to your suggestion of a seatpost with setback, I already have a 20mm setback, and my extensive research has turned up none currently made (other than some dangerously cheap BMX seatposts) that have the 50mm+ setback I would need.

    As to your suggestion of a Brooks saddle, it's not padded, and has notoriously short rails.

  2. #2
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    Anyone?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mobile 155's Avatar
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    You might ake a ook at Cobb Saddles.

    http://cobbcycling.com/

    What are you riding, what size and how tall are you?
    Life is like riding a bicycle - in order to keep your balance, you must keep moving. ~Albert Einstein.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Are you sure that your frame size is right for you? There are always special cases but, whenever I hear a request for parts that aren't readily available, my first thought is it's an effort to compensate for something else that isn't right.

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    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
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    KOPs is a guideline, a starting point, not a necessity. Both individual biomechanics figure in as do rider preference. Normal bike geometry allows this to be achieved for most people. If you have relatively long femurs, this may indicate having more saddle setback. Saddle height will also affect this to some degree, as the lower the saddle, the more forward your knee will be. Raising the saddle moves the knee back. A guideline/starting-point for saddle height is to set it such that the straightest your knee gets at the bottom of the stroke while pedaling normally is 25 degrees. This is determined while pedaling because how you pedal and the angle at which you hold your foot while at the bottom of the stroke affects this. Where do you fit into this?

  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Brooks and Campagnolo used to have a narrow spaced rail, seatpost combination the saddle was a special model of their Professional .. Tulio made a saddle rail clamp set to fit that rail spacing.that allowed the rail adjustment range to be large.. now the Selle Anatomica may offer some greater range of adjustment , with what has become a fairly standard rail spacing.

    So I'm wondering if a sprung/padded saddle exists that has rails that go close to the nose like some racing saddles do?
    don't hold your Breath,, the 1st example was race , sold for a fortune, used, when at auction,

    the 2nd is also a steel frame sling leather saddle without padding.
    what you may need to do is get a custom /modified seat post to place the saddle you like in a relationship to the BB that is suitable.

    you are asking specialty parts for a JRA low pricepoint market niche.

    Of course You can Buy a Selle Anatomica Saddle, and put a gel saddle Pad on top of it.
    It is not a mattress wide saddle anyhow..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 01-27-13 at 12:08 PM.

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    One option: .. Brompton Saddle Adapter Pin, . on top of a plain top seat Post..

    it puts a Horizontal tube clamped on top of the seat post.
    Faced forward or behind the regular seat post.

    Brompton made it to improve fit on the ONE sized bike they Make.

    Then you use a simple saddle clamp fitted to the horizontal tube , rotated so the seat goes ontop of it.

    the SAP offers a 2" setback ..

  8. #8
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by torquewrenchles View Post
    I need to set my saddle back about 2 inches so my knees will go over the pedals properly.
    As to your suggestion of a seatpost with setback, I already have a 20mm setback, and my extensive research has turned up none currently made (other than some dangerously cheap BMX seatposts) that have the 50mm+ setback I would need.
    If your frame happens to take a 27.2 post, I have a raceface post which has at least 45mm of setback. This might be another route to get the inch you seem to be needing.

    As seen here:

    Shimano : Click :: Campy :: Snap :: SRAM : Bang

  9. #9
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
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    If you're light you might be able to get away with some sort of kludge, but if you're heavier you'll be putting an enormous stress on the seat post and the seat clamps. You definitely need to have someone look at your fit.
    Rick T
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  10. #10
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    Thanks everyone for the responses.

    For those discussing frame size and fit of the bike, the only geometry that affects the saddle-to-pedal distance is the seat tube angle, seatposts with setback, moving saddle on saddle rails, and crank length (if you dare mess with that).

    Unfortunately bike manufacturers don't make several versions of a bike model with different seat tube angles. While at the same time humans do come in multiple versions of femur-to-leg ratio, which is primarily what determines what effective seat tube angle is needed in order to get the knee over the pedal -- in whatever knee position you determine is correct for you.

    For those discussing KOPS, my required saddle position has been determined by the fact that if I sit normally on the saddle my knees feel obviously cramped, and if I slide 2 inches off the back of the saddle my knees feel great. The great-feeling position coincidentally -- I later discovered, double-blind scientific experiment -- is KOPS.

    Regarding Cobb saddles: thanks for the suggestion. Too expensive and too race for me -- this is an upright comfort bike.

    Regarding Brompton Saddle Adapter Pin: this seems to be the one (quasi-) "respectable" option manufactured currently for greater than 40mm setback -- and it's ugly and scary and not actually available on the Brompton site as if they've been snapping and are discontinued?? There is a third-party site that has them. Considering it.

    There are also skanky BMX seatposts with extreme setback:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...1#post15216797

    Quote Originally Posted by rdtompki View Post
    If you're light you might be able to get away with some sort of kludge, but if you're heavier you'll be putting an enormous stress on the seat post and the seat clamps
    Yes in general I'm scared of too much setback of any kind, and am probably going to return this new bike and try to get one with slacker seat tube angle -- but I'm already on 72 and need a 67 seat tube angle (to move seat back 2 inches). And that's sooo easy to find
    Last edited by torquewrenchles; 01-30-13 at 01:30 PM. Reason: 4mm --> 40mm

  11. #11
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    Very unusual situation you have here. Is it possible the bike is completely the wrong size? How tall are you and what size/make/model of bake do you have?

    You said "the only geometry that affects the saddle-to-pedal distance is the seat tube angle, seatposts with setback, moving saddle on saddle rails, and crank length"

    but there is one more you are forgetting - the seat tube length and seapost extension... the higher your saddle for a given seat-tube angle, the further back the saddle will be.

    Bikes are generally made to fit an average population and if you fall far outside thae average (you have extremely long femurs, for example) standard bikes may not fit properly.

    Edit: Also, many (most?) bike models have a more slack seat tube angle on the larger frames than on the smaller frames, but even then it is usually just 1/2 or 1 degree. If you have the correct size bike, it is possible that your body dimensions are just outside of what can be easily accomodated by mass-manufacutred frames. This is why the Flying Spaghetti Monster (sauce be upon him) invented custom bikes... expensive, but for some, the only option.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 01-30-13 at 01:27 PM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by IthaDan View Post
    If your frame happens to take a 27.2 post, I have a raceface post which has at least 45mm of setback. This might be another route to get the inch you seem to be needing.
    Thanks -- yes a seatpost with major setback was my first thought -- and a true 45mm would exactly solve my problem.

    But if you measure your seatpost in Photoshop, from the front edge of the seatpost, to the front edge of the saddle clamp, you'll find that it only has about 30mm of setback. You can actually see this just visually, if you imagine the (27.2mm) post continuing up to the saddle -- the clamp is directly behind it. The loopy stuff is making it look more impressive than it is.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    Very unusual situation you have here.
    Only apparently so. I'm finding tons of other people needing more seat setback in various posts around the web. And no good solutions.

    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    You said "the only geometry that affects the saddle-to-pedal distance is the seat tube angle, seatposts with setback, moving saddle on saddle rails, and crank length"

    but there is one more you are forgetting - the seat tube length and seapost extension... the higher your saddle for a given seat-tube angle, the further back the saddle will be.
    Yes, this is the purpose of a sloping seat tube -- to maintain some kind of proportionality between seat height, and horizontal seat-to-pedal distance, as the seat is raised for taller people. But any bike with a (true) 72 seat tube angle will have the same distance to the pedals at any given height. And it makes no difference whether the bike has a small frame with long seatpost or big frame with a short seatpost. So the sizing issue is simply what seat tube angle is correct for your height, with your femur-to-leg ratio.

    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    many (most?) bike models have a more slack seat tube angle on the larger frames than on the smaller frames, but even then it is usually just 1/2 or 1 degree
    Yes, but unfortunately if you need the Small for standover height, you don't have the option of going larger to get the knee length.

    Incidentally I should note that from what I'm finding measuring bike photos in Photoshop that the claimed seat tube angles for bike models are often off -- I think the manufacturers may claim steeper angles (74-75) thinking this is popular, while selling slacker angles (72-73) so customers will actually have a comfortable test ride. Another critical issue that I'm reading about is that manufacturing "tolerances" are not very tight for bike frame angles in general (at least in the sub-$1000, welded sector), and a particular frame may have a significantly different seat tube angle than even the company intended or knows about (the unopened boxes go from factory to LBS). So bring a plumb line to the dealer for a KOPS (or KOPS +/-) test.

    And don't believe them if they tell you -- oh, you can just get a seatpost with another inch or two of setback if you need more room!

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Yes, but unfortunately if you need the Small for standover height, you don't have the option of going larger to get the knee length.

    order a Bike Friday Pocket rocket and that's possible.. Long .. top tube (there really is only one tube)
    is their sizing ... offered in 8 different length choices .
    the 451 20 " wheel is really quick acceleration .. or 406 wider, +< tire selection

    [+its an easy pack job, bike in the trunk, rather than on an outside rack.

    My BF, a Medium , a 56, I can mount it like a step thru frame.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 01-30-13 at 04:58 PM.

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