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  1. #1
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    Who likes rigid bikes?

    I've got a Trek 930 MTB with a rigid front fork that I always thought about upgrading with front suspension, but never did. And probably never will.

    Why I want to keep it rigid: KISS principle. No maintenance. Purist.

  2. #2
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Poll: Solid forks are for retro-losers. We need your vote!

    Yes I ride one. It's o.k.

  3. #3
    Fat Guy in Bike Shorts! manual_overide's Avatar
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    I love rigid bikes. i really don't go off-road, so any kind of suspension is a waste of money and energy for me. In fact, I just put 26x1.25 Specialized Fat Boy tires on my 12 year old bike shop huffy (i think we paid like 180 for a huffy ATB. sounds obscene, but it has some nice (for 12 years ago) parts) to replace the old knobies that were there. It's so much faster! A suspension would just ruin it.
    Last edited by manual_overide; 02-12-05 at 01:05 PM.

  4. #4
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    Yes. They are terrific. The best mountain bikes of the early '90's with hard forks were light, easy riding, low maintainance, and extremely reliable. Add slicks and a rack, and you had a "touring bike" that could easily handle dirt trails and gravel roads.

    Then, over at the bike companies, the marketing guys and finance guys put their pointy heads together and...

    Well, those nice 94 model bikes are now on E-Bay. Some go for very little money...less than the cost of buying a new suspension fork for your "modern" mountain bike.

  5. #5
    Senior Member rykoala's Avatar
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    My Specialized Rock Hopper is from the late 80's and its just as mentioned- although its not all that light But with the big fat slicks its got, and a rack and panniers, I'll venture to take that thing anywhere I need to go, albeit slower than my road bike. With 1.5" slicks it was pretty fast though. They sure are versatile bikes!

  6. #6
    Junior Member ddtbuck's Avatar
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    I went in a bike shop a few years ago and asked an employee if they had any high-end mountain bikes without suspension. He looked over at me and said “Why would you want to do that”. He thought I was ignorant… the feeling was mutual.

    My favorite ride is my 1991 Steel Stupmpjumper with top mount shifting, cantilevers, 21 speeds and of course a nice steel rigid fork. This was (in my archaic mind) the pinnacle of mountain bike innovation before they started mounting guns (rapid fires) putting on motorcycle parts (disc brakes), and adding more gears than a Rolex watch… oh yea… and started making bikes out of Coke cans.

  7. #7
    Beausage is Beautiful Fugazi Dave's Avatar
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    I don't ride rigid, and in fact eventually I fully intend to have a full suspension rig built up, but I definitely understand the draw. For me, I get the rigid/KISS thing and then some with my fixed gear.

  8. #8
    vegan powered
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    I like my rigid bike. Although the occasional super pot hole that makes you cringe when you hit it hoping you didn’t break anything.

  9. #9
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dee-vee
    I like my rigid bike. Although the occasional super pot hole that makes you cringe when you hit it hoping you didn’t break anything.
    Rigid is the easiest to bunnyhop.

  10. #10
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
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    Of my four off road bikes only one has a suspension fork on it and I would be a fibbing if I said it did not work great. BUT, for technical stuff and trials it is hard to beat a rigid fork.
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    I am in the woods and I have gone crazy.

  11. #11
    Now with racer-boy font! Moonshot's Avatar
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    Suspension forks'll make you lazy.

  12. #12
    Junior Member ddtbuck's Avatar
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    OK... I have to eat my words. I went for a bike ride today and my rigid Stumpjumper is a pile of crape. The gears are skipping and I recently replaced many parts. I guess I will have to go for a new Cross Check or get into hiking.

  13. #13
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
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    ddtbuck, if you recently replaced the parts and your bike does not work right it is not the bikes fault. Put it back in the stand and get it right. Even if you had not recently replaced stuff, still not the bikes fault. You have the tools and the brain, get to work.
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  14. #14
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddtbuck
    OK... I have to eat my words. I went for a bike ride today and my rigid Stumpjumper is a pile of crape. The gears are skipping and I recently replaced many parts. I guess I will have to go for a new Cross Check or get into hiking.
    Parts?
    I have maybe 3 original, everything has worn out. Frames fine.
    Gears skipping are not a fork issue.
    -Or a frame issue unless you've bent your derailler hanger.

    Make it a single speed.

  15. #15
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonshot
    Suspension forks'll make you lazy.
    Suspension makes you impotent. Much rather be known as a rigid rider.

    Oh, I believe this is true for aluminium as well.
    Last edited by jeff williams; 02-12-05 at 09:13 PM.

  16. #16
    hateful little monkey jim-bob's Avatar
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    None of my bikes have any boingy bits on 'em.

  17. #17
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim? scrublover's Avatar
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    me! though i also like squishy bikes. there are some places i've ridden that would eat a rigid fork, unless you happened to be a trials skill god.

    oh, the horror! not suspension! *gasp*

    some days i take the rigid SS out, when i'm in a luddite mood. other days it's the hardtail, or the fully.
    i don't really

    ride what ya like, and don't knock others for their choice in forks/bikes. sheesh.

    "light, easy riding, low maintainance, and extremely reliable." funny, that pretty much describes my hardtail and fully just as much as it does my rigid ride.
    I believe the clouds in my coffee more than the weatherman on t.v.

  18. #18
    human velocipedio's Avatar
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    my city ride is a 1992 specialized rockhopper sport. all steel with a rigid fork. it is perfect. i can't imagine either wanting or needing a pogo fork, even with potholes.
    when walking, just walk. when sitting, just sit. when riding, just ride. above all, don't wobble.

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  19. #19
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    I have an early 90's Gary Fisher Cronus I picked up last year that I love. I think it had a suspension fork when it was new but it had a rigid fork when I got it. I've never had suspension so I don't really know what I'm missing but I usually don't feel a need for it either, just on the rare, really bumpy trail or washed out dirt road I might be on. I recently picked up a Karate Monkey (rigid) so I set up the GF as a commuter/grocery-getter with fenders and front/rear racks. It's not as fast as my road bike but it's a lot of fun for shorter trips and I can carry 4 bags of groceries.

  20. #20
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Suspension?? Just some more crap to break. Rigid Forever!!!!!!!!!!!

  21. #21
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    Low weight, crisp handling, firm braking......what's not to like?

    Cheap suspension isn't worth having (except a springy Brooks, maybe?)and good stuff isn't cheap to buy or run- and my body would rebel if I took up DH'ing. I have been playing with a fixed/free cross bike all winter. It's technically and physically demanding and the challenges are stimulating in themselves. Quicker maintenance is a happy by-product.

    I like the early 90's bikes as well. It's like that whole branch of innovation just stopped and we were encouraged to embrace a whole new level of complexity, with all the potential for reliability problems. Great if you like it, but lightweight, low-tech and user-serviceable will always have a niche. I'm still running my '85 Rockhopper, the best value, most versatile of all the bikes I've owned- still capable of performing as it was designed to. That's what I call appropriate technology.

  22. #22
    cyclist/gearhead/cycli... moxfyre's Avatar
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    It seems to me that there are so many factors besides suspension that can make a bike more or less comfortable off road. I have an '83 carbon steel frame on my fixie with 32 mm slicks and it's about as comfortable off road as my aluminum mountain bike with crummy suspension fork was.

    Suspension adds weight, inefficiency, cost, and complexity to a bike... I think it's basically a fad right now. Of course it is appropriate for serious mountain bikers, but I think there are better ways to make other bikes shock-absorbing and comfortable without suspension.
    My bikes | Linux and Python stuff | Photo gallery

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  23. #23
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    I think a lot of preference has to do with where and how you ride. The rougher and bumpier the terrain is, the more you might appreciate suspension. Also the faster you ride and the harder you hit the bumps, the more you might appreciate suspension. Just like single speed. I know a lot of people like it and I can kind of see the appeal but I walk up enough hills even with all my gears. Either they have much stronger legs than mine or they ride on flatter terrain.

  24. #24
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim? scrublover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris hansen
    I think a lot of preference has to do with where and how you ride. The rougher and bumpier the terrain is, the more you might appreciate suspension. Also the faster you ride and the harder you hit the bumps, the more you might appreciate suspension. Just like single speed. I know a lot of people like it and I can kind of see the appeal but I walk up enough hills even with all my gears. Either they have much stronger legs than mine or they ride on flatter terrain.

    hee! ride my SS up and down some looooong climbs here on the front range and rocky mountains.

    it's not really as hard climbing on a SS as people think......... once you figure out your gearing needs.
    it does take some adjustment though. when on my SS, i stand and crank, vs. sitting and spinning on the hartdail or fully bikes. hmmm, that sounds a little dirty.

    and yes, the faster/nastier the terrain, the more i like my sussy bikes. hitting the DH lift accessed stuff on my rigid bike would be painful. on the hardtail or the fully, it's a blast.

    just different styles of riding, for different terrain/speeds. i sure don't need suspension, but for some rides/trails, it's awfully nice. i say that having ridden many of the same trails rigid and suspended. fun either way.
    I believe the clouds in my coffee more than the weatherman on t.v.

  25. #25
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    I'm running a 38T monoring to a 140mm axle 7-speed.
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    No, it's not bmx, but some parts are.

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