Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Groin numbness

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Groin numbness--should I see a doctor?

    Hello,

    I haven't ridden a bike in about 20 years, since I was 11 or 12. I recently decided to try a 45-min. Express Cycling class at my local YMCA.

    The instructor helped adjust the seat to about handlebar height, and I sat and peddled for about 10 or 15 min. until she instructed everyone to rise from their seats and apply resistance to the bike. When I rose, I felt a numbness in my groin that was immediately accompanied by strong pulsations of blood rushing back to it. This lasted for maybe 8 or 10 seconds at most before the numbness disappeared. When we subsequently stood and sit, stood and sit, ad infinitum, until the end of the class, I did not experience this phenomenon at all. However, I was generally uncomfortable in the seat during the class, and for about a day afterwards my perineum area was slightly red and a tad sore. I am a bit overweight at about 206 lbs. and was wearing regular exercise shorts.

    After doing several hours of Googling and reading about potential ED, impotence, permanent nerve damage, etc. from bike riding, I became very concerned and decided that I will not be going back to the class again, nor very possibly riding a bike again, save for a recumbent. I am also a bit put off by the instructor because after the class she had told me that this numbness was "normal" and I'll "get used to it." When I asked her about any permanent sexual dysfunction from the numbness, she paused and said jokingly, "well, you'll have to come back and let us know."

    I had some almost unnoticeable tingling for brief instances in my groin that occurred intermittently during the 24-hour period after the class. And also I felt that my penis was very slightly less sensitive than I'm used to, but I was still able to get and sustain an adequate erection and perform normal sexual function within hours of finishing the class. It has been less than 48 hours since the class, but I expect that my body may need a few more days to completely "recover." If a week has gone by and I still feel less sensitive, I will be concerned.

    I realize this is largely a forum of biking enthusiasts, so maybe this is the wrong place to ask this question. But what I'd really like to know is, based on the brief period of time my groin went numb, should I be concerned enough about any potential long-term issues (i.e. permanent nerve damage) that I should consult a doctor?

    Thanks in advance,
    Bikerj (who is not a biker)
    Last edited by bikerj; 04-07-13 at 08:05 PM.

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    Posts
    25,113
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    New York City
    My Bikes
    2012 CAAD10
    Posts
    134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You were sitting too long in one position on a saddle that was probably way too high, not wearing a chamois, not rising out of the saddle or moving around occasionally, and so your stuff went numb. It happens. It won't kill you or make your piece fall off. Think of it this way -- ever had your foot fall asleep? Yeah? But you recovered, right? Well, now you've had your wang fall asleep. New experiences all around.

    Like any sport, bicycling can, if done incorrectly, cause injury -- and that can in rare cases include injury to your groin. But two things: First, you really do get "used to it" -- in the sense that you learn how to ride a bicycle, how not to let your junk go numb, and therefore how not to have this problem. Second, millions of men ride -- and I guarantee you that we're all perfectly capable of...entertaining...the millions of women who also ride. You didn't break anything, man.
    The most important thing is simply to ride.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Clarabelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sequim, Washington on the Olympic Peninsula
    My Bikes
    Co-Motion Mocha, Fuji touring, Trex hybrid, Bike Friday Tandem Traveler
    Posts
    438
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I solved the same problem with a split saddle like the one listed below. It isn't perfect, and one needs to stand up periodically etc. but the numbness and pain are mostly gone.

    http://www.amazon.com/Planet-Bike-A-...addles+for+men

  5. #5
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not a doctor so this advice is worth what you paid for it.

    If normal feeling returns to your gentleman areas within a short time then don't worry about it. Like someone already said it's just like your foot going to sleep, albeit more concerning when it actually happens. Since you described "normal sexual function" within hours of the class finishing it's clear that everything is still working down there. If things feel significantly less sensitive it might be cause for concern but be aware that the way things feel can often be subjective and it's very easy to convince yourself that you feel a certain way because you're looking out for it.

    Try lowering your saddle a little and tilting it so the nose is slightly lower than it currently is (when tilting it you don't want to be lowering the nose by more than about 1/4" at a time) and you'll probably find things get better. If you're sitting on the narrow part of the saddle your man parts will be taking your weight, which isn't supposed to happen. If that happens move your weight backwards, and if that's uncomfortable move your saddle forwards.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  6. #6
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    My Bikes
    RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
    Posts
    11,454
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's not your groin that you are talking about. Although you did finally mention Mr. Johnson.
    Never heard of one ride causing any permanent damage.
    I can testify that recumbent riding will not result in NPS (Numb Pecker Syndrome.)
    I would imagine, however, that you could ride an upright bike without issues if you can find a saddle that is compatible with you and if you can adjust the bike/saddle to your needs.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks everyone for replying and setting my mind at ease! I feel a lot better now. I saw the instructor again and told her that I won't be trying the class again, and she was very understanding and supportive. I bear her no ill will (hey, I made the decision to try the class!). I think I will stick with recumbent bikes for the time being.

    I believe I am more or less back to normal sensitivity, so I'm not going to worry about it anymore.

    Thanks again for everyone's input!

  8. #8
    Devourer of souls Dead Roman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Texas
    My Bikes
    Felt f70
    Posts
    1,464
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    your junk isnt gonna work forever anyway bro.
    The road of life is winding, but the pavement is smooth

  9. #9
    7-speed doomsday prepper ThermionicScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    CID
    My Bikes
    1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX
    Posts
    7,731
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of those exercise bikes are miserable to set up comfortably. I wouldn't let that put you off of "real" bikes in any form.
    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
    RUSA #7498

  10. #10
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    My Bikes
    RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
    Posts
    11,454
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerj View Post
    Thanks everyone for replying and setting my mind at ease! I feel a lot better now. I saw the instructor again and told her that I won't be trying the class again, and she was very understanding and supportive. I bear her no ill will (hey, I made the decision to try the class!). I think I will stick with recumbent bikes for the time being.

    I believe I am more or less back to normal sensitivity, so I'm not going to worry about it anymore.

    Thanks again for everyone's input!
    Do you ever ride bicycles? Quite different than using exercise machines. Much more fun.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  11. #11
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
    Do you ever ride bicycles? Quite different than using exercise machines. Much more fun.
    I used to ride when I was younger, but I don't anymore. I don't recall having any problems with numbness on my old mountain bike, but then again I was a lot less heavy as a kid, which probably helped not to put much pressure on the area.

    I agree that actual bikes are much more fun! The good that's come out of this recent experience at the Y is that, were I now to go shopping for a new bike, I would pay much closer attention to the design and feel of the seat.

  12. #12
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerj View Post
    I used to ride when I was younger, but I don't anymore. I don't recall having any problems with numbness on my old mountain bike, but then again I was a lot less heavy as a kid, which probably helped not to put much pressure on the area.

    I agree that actual bikes are much more fun! The good that's come out of this recent experience at the Y is that, were I now to go shopping for a new bike, I would pay much closer attention to the design and feel of the seat.
    Don't write off an otherwise perfect bike because of the saddle it comes with - you can always change the saddle.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  13. #13
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    Don't write off an otherwise perfect bike because of the saddle it comes with - you can always change the saddle.
    Good point. All the same, I'm glad that I'm now more aware of the critical importance of saddle design in making biking safe and comfortable. I learned from the instructor that the exercise bikes at the Y have fixed saddles that can't be swapped, otherwise I would've considered swapping the saddle for one that didn't cause numbness. Oh well. I've lived and learned.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    6367 km away from the center of the Earth
    Posts
    1,065
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerj View Post
    Good point. All the same, I'm glad that I'm now more aware of the critical importance of saddle design in making biking safe and comfortable. I learned from the instructor that the exercise bikes at the Y have fixed saddles that can't be swapped, otherwise I would've considered swapping the saddle for one that didn't cause numbness. Oh well. I've lived and learned.
    Seat covers do exist (if you can find one that works for you)

  15. #15
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,185
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Alternate, standing and seated, pedaling..


    I haven't ridden a bike in about 20 years, since I was 11 or 12. I recently decided to try a 45-min. Express Cycling class at my local YMCA.
    I expect you also wouldn't know one saddle from another, (so won't ask)
    or the adjustments that the Stationary bike you use at the Y, may have..

    arrive early next time and ask the spinning class teacher to help adjust that one better..

    Perhaps a BYO saddle or adding a gel saddle pad will be practical..

    know what make & model the gymnasium gear is?
    Last edited by fietsbob; 04-08-13 at 08:46 AM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Notso_fastLane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Medford, OR
    My Bikes
    Kona MTN bike, Bent TW Elegance
    Posts
    685
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since you already mentioned it, I'm gonna go with recumbent. Love mine, wouldn't go back to an upright for commuting again. I still have an upright mtn bike, but I don't spend a lot of time sitting when I'm riding the trails...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •