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  1. #1
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    Is there a quick and easy way to attach and detach a standard rear bike rack?

    My rear bike rack/basket setup is like this, but with only one basket:

    AAAAApBAON8AAAAAARuAWg.jpg

    80%-90% of the time, I don't need my rear rack/rear basket (or the added weight it brings), so I don't have it attached. On those rare occasions when I need to make a shopping trip or want to take my dog to the park, I don't want to go to the hassle of screwing in the rack for that one errand and then removing it.

    Are there any quick release screws or bolts I can use to make this task faster or easier to accomplish? (Can't seem to find useful Google search terms for this)

    I'm not interested in buying a new rack; I want to find a way to make my current setup work for me.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    If the frame of your bike is equipped with rack mounting eyelets on the seatstays and at the dropouts, then removing the rack is simply removing four screws to detach it from the bike and put it aside, then reattach by holding the rack in place and re-installing the four screws. If you have p-clamps instead of drouputs then this changes things because they don't stay in the same place when you remove the rack lke brazed-on eyelets do.

    The other thing you could do is leave the rack in place and remove the basket, which is probably 80% of the weight of your rack/basket combo. An unloaded rack is very light and you generally won't notice it while riding. THen get some sort of easily-detachable bag or basket to clip on the rack when you need it.

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    Unfortunately, detaching the basket from the rack is not an option. This basket rattled around when attached using only the included screws, so I added several hose clamps and bolts to hold it tighter. Having to undo those attachments each time would be even more trouble.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    I am not suggesting you detach and reinstall that folding basket each time, I am suggesting finding a way to carry things that is easier to detach than your baskets. Like a pannier or a quick-release basket.

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    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megacoupe View Post
    Unfortunately, detaching the basket from the rack is not an option. This basket rattled around when attached using only the included screws, so I added several hose clamps and bolts to hold it tighter. Having to undo those attachments each time would be even more trouble.
    Replace the hose clamps with zip ties (cut and replace) or velcro cable ties (reuseable fabric zip tie)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    Replace the hose clamps with zip ties (cut and replace) or velcro cable ties (reuseable fabric zip tie)
    Or just live with the weight. It's probably 1 percent of the weight of the bike-rider package.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velo Dog View Post
    Or just live with the weight. It's probably 1 percent of the weight of the bike-rider package.
    I am definitely not what anyone would call a 'weight weenie' but even I would be bothered by the weight of a steel folding basket on a bike on a recreational ride longer than a few kms.

    And those baskets all weigh around 1 - 1.5 kg, so are probably closer to 2-3% of total weight for the average person.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jputnam's Avatar
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    Assuming your bike has eyelets for mounting the rack:

    Remove the rack.

    Get screws about 1cm longer than you have now, M5 wing nuts, and some standard M5 hex nuts.

    Thread the screws in from the back side of the eyelets until they're tight, then lock them in place with the nuts.

    You now have threaded studs on the bike that you can simply slip the rack stays over, and secure the rack with wing nuts.

    Also works well if you want to have full-stay fenders that are quick to mount and remove.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jputnam/collections/72157604835074312/

  10. #10
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratdog View Post
    Looks like a pretty slick solution to me.

  11. #11
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    I am definitely not what anyone would call a 'weight weenie' but even I would be bothered by the weight of a steel folding basket on a bike on a recreational ride longer than a few kms.

    And those baskets all weigh around 1 - 1.5 kg, so are probably closer to 2-3% of total weight for the average person.
    I hate to say this, but you're probably imagining this. Even at "recreational" speeds most of your energy goes to overcoming air drag. A little extra weight won't slow you down to any measurable degree.

    An alternative would be something like this:
    http://sunlitecycling.com/product_de...r+Bag&cl1=BAGS

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jputnam View Post
    Assuming your bike has eyelets for mounting the rack:

    Remove the rack.

    Get screws about 1cm longer than you have now, M5 wing nuts, and some standard M5 hex nuts.

    Thread the screws in from the back side of the eyelets until they're tight, then lock them in place with the nuts.

    You now have threaded studs on the bike that you can simply slip the rack stays over, and secure the rack with wing nuts.

    Also works well if you want to have full-stay fenders that are quick to mount and remove.
    You could do the same with allen screws, and do away with the screw heads. Temp covets for the studs could be cap nuts, screwed on finger tight when not in use. Wing nuts are still a good choice for attachment

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  13. #13
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
    I hate to say this, but you're probably imagining this. Even at "recreational" speeds most of your energy goes to overcoming air drag. A little extra weight won't slow you down to any measurable degree.

    An alternative would be something like this:
    http://sunlitecycling.com/product_de...r+Bag&cl1=BAGS

    i am sure it would be no actual disadvantage
    but it is certainly enough extra weight that you could not hep but know its there
    and it would make a difference in climbing

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    It's called Tools..

    Un bolt the whole rack theres just 4 bolts.. ..


    you can also buy 5x.8mm studs, at the auto parts store a stud is a bolt without a head.



    A quick release would be a seat-post mounted beam rack,
    those have a QR grip around the seat post. basket to go on top, perhaps?
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-04-13 at 01:10 PM.

  15. #15
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    The advantage of allen screws over studs, is that you can easily hold an allen screw, while tightening the "double nut."

    Allen screws come in all lengths and sizes at most hardware stores, in a variety of material. Stainless would be my choice.

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  16. #16
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megacoupe View Post
    My rear bike rack/basket setup is like this, but with only one basket:

    AAAAApBAON8AAAAAARuAWg.jpg

    80%-90% of the time, I don't need my rear rack/rear basket (or the added weight it brings), so I don't have it attached. On those rare occasions when I need to make a shopping trip or want to take my dog to the park, I don't want to go to the hassle of screwing in the rack for that one errand and then removing it.

    Are there any quick release screws or bolts I can use to make this task faster or easier to accomplish? (Can't seem to find useful Google search terms for this)

    I'm not interested in buying a new rack; I want to find a way to make my current setup work for me.
    In order to use what you have you have two basic choices.....
    Build up a super cheap beater bike that you leave the rack on all the time.

    -or-

    find and buy a used kids trailer to convert to hauling duties.
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  17. #17
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    Thanks for all the ideas.

    Quote Originally Posted by jputnam View Post
    Assuming your bike has eyelets for mounting the rack:

    Remove the rack.

    Get screws about 1cm longer than you have now, M5 wing nuts, and some standard M5 hex nuts.

    Thread the screws in from the back side of the eyelets until they're tight, then lock them in place with the nuts.

    You now have threaded studs on the bike that you can simply slip the rack stays over, and secure the rack with wing nuts.

    Also works well if you want to have full-stay fenders that are quick to mount and remove.
    I decided to go with the idea above, buying several types of screws, wing nuts and cap nuts to see what I could do with them.

    However, I ran into a problem: the "eyelets" under my saddle are rather long and close together (it's a Trek 7.1 FX). I measured them at about 25mm long (each) and 22mm apart from each other. The longest allen screws I could find at Home Depot were 30mm. However, when I tried to screw one in from the inside out, I could not get it to fit between the eyelets!

    C4G2HQpl.jpg

    So, I tried screwing it in from outside in, but part of the screw near the head is not threaded; it would not go all the way through the eyelet. Besides, I'm not sure that the extra 5mm on the end would have been enough to screw a wing nut or cap nut over.

    I also tried Advance Auto Parts, Autozone and Pepboys to get a threaded stud. One place had no idea what it was and others had nothing near the size I needed.

    At this point, I'm pretty sure threaded studs would work well, but I have no idea where to get them. Home Depot and the auto parts stores near me don't have them. Even an online search doesn't come up with anything for size M5 x 0.8mm. Is there a different name for it perhaps?

    Or, is there any other kind of screw or attachment that might work?

  18. #18
    GT4
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    I would get a rack that clamps on to the seatpost and put touring bags on. There's probably no more than 4 screws on that type of rack; hopefully that isn't enough to get under your skin.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT4 View Post
    I would get a rack that clamps on to the seatpost and put touring bags on. There's probably no more than 4 screws on that type of rack; hopefully that isn't enough to get under your skin.
    Those seatpost mounted racks are feeble and wobbly compared to a standard rack and could not hold nearly the same weight of stuff.

  20. #20
    Cabrőnista™ dprayvd's Avatar
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    Yes, and this it lol.

    First, forget any funnybusiness. Use bolts into eyelets. That is why they are there. 5mm bolt-heads have the best longevity regarding "rounding-out" in my experience-being they do get used on occasion(s) such as removing the rack for whatever need as well as the "since-I've-out-my-wrenches" torque-check.

    Step one: With the bike upright, and the rack's rear on the ground, affix the rack's main support legs with the bolts--both sides--into the drop-out eyelets.
    Do not tighten these fully (yet).
    The rack can/may now pivot about the rear wheel's radius. Isn't this convienent
    Also, at this point, route the RD cable housing as you deem.

    Step two: pivot the rack upward, bringing the upper support arms toward the upper seatstay eyelets.
    Set your preferred rack geometry.
    Affix the support arms to the seatstay eyelets (with the bolts.)

    Step three: torque them bolts--but not too tight. Also, I lay weight upon the rack (me) so the rack's legs' support-points are resting firmly on the drop-out eyelet bolts during the torque.

    Weird, I know; this is how I do it.
    I love bikes! They are so "bolt-on."

  21. #21
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megacoupe View Post
    Thanks for all the ideas.



    I decided to go with the idea above, buying several types of screws, wing nuts and cap nuts to see what I could do with them.

    However, I ran into a problem: the "eyelets" under my saddle are rather long and close together (it's a Trek 7.1 FX). I measured them at about 25mm long (each) and 22mm apart from each other. The longest allen screws I could find at Home Depot were 30mm. However, when I tried to screw one in from the inside out, I could not get it to fit between the eyelets!

    C4G2HQpl.jpg

    So, I tried screwing it in from outside in, but part of the screw near the head is not threaded; it would not go all the way through the eyelet. Besides, I'm not sure that the extra 5mm on the end would have been enough to screw a wing nut or cap nut over.

    I also tried Advance Auto Parts, Autozone and Pepboys to get a threaded stud. One place had no idea what it was and others had nothing near the size I needed.

    At this point, I'm pretty sure threaded studs would work well, but I have no idea where to get them. Home Depot and the auto parts stores near me don't have them. Even an online search doesn't come up with anything for size M5 x 0.8mm. Is there a different name for it perhaps?

    Or, is there any other kind of screw or attachment that might work?
    its probably a blessing in disguise that this didnt work

    leaving threaded steel bolts sticking out even a little bit
    will inevitably wind up turning into a can opener for the inside of your legs

    cute idea
    but not very smart

  22. #22
    Zeusmeatball Push's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megacoupe View Post
    Thanks for all the ideas.



    I decided to go with the idea above, buying several types of screws, wing nuts and cap nuts to see what I could do with them.

    However, I ran into a problem: the "eyelets" under my saddle are rather long and close together (it's a Trek 7.1 FX). I measured them at about 25mm long (each) and 22mm apart from each other. The longest allen screws I could find at Home Depot were 30mm. However, when I tried to screw one in from the inside out, I could not get it to fit between the eyelets!

    C4G2HQpl.jpg

    So, I tried screwing it in from outside in, but part of the screw near the head is not threaded; it would not go all the way through the eyelet. Besides, I'm not sure that the extra 5mm on the end would have been enough to screw a wing nut or cap nut over.

    I also tried Advance Auto Parts, Autozone and Pepboys to get a threaded stud. One place had no idea what it was and others had nothing near the size I needed.

    At this point, I'm pretty sure threaded studs would work well, but I have no idea where to get them. Home Depot and the auto parts stores near me don't have them. Even an online search doesn't come up with anything for size M5 x 0.8mm. Is there a different name for it perhaps?

    Or, is there any other kind of screw or attachment that might work?
    Sears Hardware carries what you need as far as nuts/bolts, its where I get most of mine and they are pretty cheap.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratdog View Post
    Looks rather spendy for what amounts to any entry grade rack... Could achieve much the same with little more than a set of wing nuts and a couple of washers.

    Or maybe I am reacting negatively to the demo video showing mostly a poor story of some rider who can't think to shift down to a lower gear and thus is blowing out his knees...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by megacoupe View Post
    My rear bike rack/basket setup is like this, but with only one basket:
    $25USD for the item below will do the job just as well and when empty, they weight only a couple of ounces, but also Very easy to remove when not needed. Better yet, they won't make your bike look like some grandma's grocery run beater.

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...67_-1___202599

  25. #25
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    Get appropriate length and size bolts and wing nuts. Run the wing nuts up the bolts, but *upside down*. Run them all the way up to the bolt head, tight. Use some red Loc Tite to permanently lock the nut on the bolt. You now have wing bolts. Quick and easy to use with just finger tight, spin'em on, spin'em off.

    if the bolt heads won't go down between the wings get different bolts. I use Allen heads. If you don't have Loc Tite use a punch to deform the threads under the wing nut after putting it on the bolt.

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