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Old 04-28-13, 09:50 AM   #1
lungimsam
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Any one ride cyclocross bikes for the wider tires and better fenderability?

Seems like modern geometry drop bar bikes don't allow for much wider tires than 28mm with fenderability for someone who likes to commute on a modern style drop bar bike.

Anyone using cross bikes for their fenderability and wider tires for commuting?

I know about the old school geometry modern bikes. But was wondering what are the options if you like the modern geometry bikes for commuting.
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Old 04-28-13, 10:15 AM   #2
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'Cross' marketing label extends into Hybrids too.. , just the bars are not drop type.. the companies lower cost bikes
will have all the fittings.. made for the Commuter/sport rider..
but companies sell lots of sub race bikes as 'cyclocross'.
so the label is spongy not clear in definition.

Cyclocross is typically, an hour race, once a week fall to new years..
but many people buy them anyhow, these days.

My 1 Cyclocross bike is not fenderable, no fittings, no matter ,
I get out a different bike when its raining.. or threatening to.. since I'm not racing..


Realistically, you need the car to drive to the race with dry clothes , spare parts,
and the heater in the car to warm up again.

you realize there is a Cyclocross section that is full of this stuff, right?
http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdispl.../23-Cyclocross

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-28-13 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 04-28-13, 10:37 AM   #3
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I once asked someone to explain the difference to me between a hybrid and a cyclocross bike. Some of the responders got a little testy.
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Old 04-28-13, 05:07 PM   #4
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Anyone using cross bikes for their fenderability and wider tires for commuting?
They're pretty common if you check over in the Commuting forum. Only real differences between road and cross frames is the rake of the fork and height of the BB. The majority of folks prolly couldn't tell the difference.

Lots of road bikes that will take decent tires and fenders. Surly Pacers and BD Motobecanes come to mind.
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Old 04-28-13, 05:10 PM   #5
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I've been using a cross bike (a soma doublecross) as a road bike for years. I've always liked road racing bikes with fat tires. They handle well and they're comfortable over a wide variety of terrains. Cross bikes make a great commuter and a great swiss army knife bike.
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Old 04-28-13, 11:03 PM   #6
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Not a cross bike, but I bought a Rivendell Atlantis instead of several other bikes because I wanted fenders and wide tires. I tried hard to find something locally, but the shops kept telling me how much faster I'd be with skinny tires.... I hate to sound like a geezer (I AM a geezer), but I've been riding since 1970. I know what I want.
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Old 04-29-13, 05:08 AM   #7
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Not a cross bike, but I bought a Rivendell Atlantis instead of several other bikes because I wanted fenders and wide tires. I tried hard to find something locally, but the shops kept telling me how much faster I'd be with skinny tires.... I hate to sound like a geezer (I AM a geezer), but I've been riding since 1970. I know what I want.
Tell ME about it!

I choose my bikes to suit me, fenders, relaxed riding style and wider tires. I don't care if you call them touring bikes, cyclocross bikes or hybrids. I look for tire clearance and geometry. FWIW most of my bikes are either old Raleigh Sports or euro spec "trekking" bikes.

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Old 04-29-13, 05:28 AM   #8
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but the shops kept telling me how much faster I'd be with skinny tires....
What's really annoying about this is it (mostly) isn't true.

Given the same type of tire, same pressure, the wider tire has less rolling resistance. This completely trumps the additional weight of the tire (but may not trump the difference of aerodynamics at high speeds - not a problem for most of us).
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Old 04-30-13, 06:04 PM   #9
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Yes, exactly why I have one. 32mm tires w/ fenders = fun riding on gravel and other rough roads.
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Old 04-30-13, 07:00 PM   #10
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Lots of road bikes that will take decent tires and fenders. Surly Pacers and BD Motobecanes come to mind.
i dont know about lots
but a few
i cant think of ten modern road bikes that can fit 32mm tires and or fenders

surly
soma
jamis
motobecane
??? what others?
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Old 04-30-13, 07:04 PM   #11
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I once asked someone to explain the difference to me between a hybrid and a cyclocross bike. Some of the responders got a little testy.
I'd love to understand the difference too., apart from the drop bars and road gearing.
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Old 04-30-13, 08:14 PM   #12
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as I said, Now 'cross' is a marketing label.. racing cyclocross is one sector, if you get one
then want to add mudguards and a rack and there is no place to fit them.. you overspent
and headed too far down the wrong path . save it for the racing season.
though the things that were altered to make the shouldering the bike and running up stairs and steep hills ,
in a race, might help you get up to the 3rd floor walk up apartment, so long as the stair way is not too narrow.

Want Mudguards and a rack .. N+1 and get a different variety . now you know to look for the places to attach stuff.
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Old 04-30-13, 09:21 PM   #13
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yes fietsbob there are two kinds of cyclocross bike now
the sport cyclocross and the racing cyclocross
racing cyclocross like road racing bikes usually cant fit rack and panniers
but the sport versions
which have a less aggressive geometry and setup and rack and fender mounts
and sometimes triple chainrings
horror of horrors
so that people can actually use them
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Old 04-30-13, 09:58 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=Wilfred Laurier;15573367
but the sport versions
which have a less aggressive geometry and setup and rack and fender mounts
and sometimes triple chainrings
horror of horrors
so that people can actually use them[/QUOTE]

This sounds just like a touring bike without the low rider braze ons on the fork.
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Old 05-01-13, 12:38 AM   #15
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Yup. I have 37mm tires and ancient bluemel's lightweight fenders on mine.

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Old 05-01-13, 06:08 AM   #16
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I'd love to understand the difference too., apart from the drop bars and road gearing.
Other than the front suspension on some hybrids, I think you just explained the difference quite nicely.
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Old 05-01-13, 07:37 AM   #17
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This sounds just like a touring bike without the low rider braze ons on the fork.
there is no clear line between toruing cport cx and race cx
it really boils down to how the bike is used
but in general what companies are selling as sport cx bikes will likely be a little lighter and a little shorter
than the bike they sell as a touring bike
in general but i am sure with many exceptions

if you show up at a cx race with a touring bike with the racks and fenders removed and cx tires installed
nobody is going to look sideways at you

likewise if you mount racks and fenders on your carbon cx bike and ride across bolivia
then you have made youself a very light and quick handling touring bike
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Old 05-01-13, 08:03 AM   #18
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If designed as a true "racing" cross bike, it'll be lighter and not have eyelets for fenders or a rack and will probably have a double crank and gearing designed for racing. There's certainly a market for a "cross" bike that functions more as an all-rounder, rack eyelets, triple crank, etc... and you see a lot of those.

Besides higher b-bracket on a cross (vs.low on a tourer) as mentioned, another major difference between a cross and a tourer is wheelbase and chainstay length, with a tourer having longer of both. The longer chainstays on a tourer help prevent heal strike of the shoes against the panniers. As well, the longer wheel base makes the bike more stable and that is important with a load. Then the fork on a cross might be carbon with no eyelets, while a tourer might have a steel and be beefier. That, BTW affects the ride if you want to use your tourer with a set of 25mm tires at 120psi, you might notice then the stiffness of the fork !.
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Old 05-01-13, 08:30 AM   #19
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If designed as a true "racing" cross bike, it'll be lighter and not have eyelets for fenders or a rack and will probably have a double crank and gearing designed for racing. There's certainly a market for a "cross" bike that functions more as an all-rounder, rack eyelets, triple crank, etc... and you see a lot of those.

Besides higher b-bracket on a cross (vs.low on a tourer) as mentioned, another major difference between a cross and a tourer is wheelbase and chainstay length, with a tourer having longer of both. The longer chainstays on a tourer help prevent heal strike of the shoes against the panniers. As well, the longer wheel base makes the bike more stable and that is important with a load. Then the fork on a cross might be carbon with no eyelets, while a tourer might have a steel and be beefier. That, BTW affects the ride if you want to use your tourer with a set of 25mm tires at 120psi, you might notice then the stiffness of the fork !.
Keep in mind that these generalizations are true for most bikes in these categories but I am sure there are bikes intended to be CX bikes with longer chainstays, for instance, than some bikes intended to be tourers. Although the ideal cx racing bike probably wouldn't make much of a tourer and vise versa, there is no strict definition that separates the bikes and there is a large degree of cross-compatibility
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Old 05-01-13, 09:18 AM   #20
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Other than the front suspension on some hybrids, I think you just explained the difference quite nicely.
Thanks .. I have been debating n+1 or a new wheelset, and this definitely sways me towards the wheelset.
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Old 05-01-13, 05:14 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
i cant think of ten modern road bikes that can fit 32mm tires and or fenders
surly
soma
jamis
motobecane
??? what others?
Rivendell
Salsa
Schwinn DBX
Kona Hnky Inc
Redline Conquest Disc
Novara Verita

Just off the top of my head,but I'm sure you could search out others. My Defy will take 28's and fenders.

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I'd love to understand the difference too., apart from the drop bars and road gearing.
The BB's are higher and frame geometry is basically slackened road,whereas hybrids can have many different geometries. Cross bikes usually have mid-to-high gearing like a 48/38 or 46/39 double;they don't need low gearing because the rider's carry them,and they don't have high road gearing because they usually don't have room. Cross bikes can only have canti's or discs,and can only have 700c wheels. They usually run their cables across the TT.

Basically,the frame and the gearing. There is a wide range of hybrids,while cross bikes tend to be fairly similar. There's a world of difference between my Marin Pt Reyes or Novara Buzz and a Fairfax or Express. Not so much of a difference between a Cross Check and a Tricross.
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Old 05-01-13, 05:26 PM   #22
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Yup. I have 37mm tires and ancient bluemel's lightweight fenders on mine.

Mine has 35mm tires and bike planet fenders.
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Old 05-01-13, 05:27 PM   #23
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Other than the front suspension on some hybrids, I think you just explained the difference quite nicely.
My hybrid is basically a road bike with flat bars and a headshok. It has a road triple.
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Old 05-02-13, 08:30 PM   #24
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Yes, I commute on a cyclocross bike. In fact, the one I bought even came with a 50/34 chainring and I think was probably intended for people who wanted to use it as a commuter. 32 tires and fenders- works great as a commuter.
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Old 05-03-13, 08:38 AM   #25
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Yes, I commute on a cyclocross bike. In fact, the one I bought even came with a 50/34 chainring and I think was probably intended for people who wanted to use it as a commuter. 32 tires and fenders- works great as a commuter.
the 50 34 combo is very common on recreational road bikes nowadays
called a compact double

it is supposed to give range almost as wide as a triple
but with better shifting

racing cx bikes generally have slightly lower gearing that that i think

while most bikes intended for road racing are close to the old standard
like 53 39 or so
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