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-   -   Pedals with both - SPD clips and then normal shoes one (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/887961-pedals-both-spd-clips-then-normal-shoes-one.html)

Gloor 05-05-13 03:45 PM

Pedals with both - SPD clips and then normal shoes one
 
Hello guys,

I would like to get pedals for my new Marin bike but I don't know what to look for. I have SPD shoes that I have used for spinning so I would like to use those shoes for the bike but not always so I need pedals that have one side as normal for normal day shoes and the other side has this SPD clips so I can use it.
However, I tried to look for some and I am a bit confused about it as when i go on chainreactioncycles.com website they have something called clipless pedals which seems like what I need but why are they called clipless when they have the SPD clip there? What am I missing?

I like these pedals but I don't know if the other side is normal so if I have normal trainers will it be ok or not?

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=67249

How does one search for clips that have SPD on one side and normal pedal on the other? Is there a type or code to look for?
Could you please suggest some for me, not so expensive but also not total crap :))

Thank you so much for any help and your time guys.

dynaryder 05-05-13 04:19 PM

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=5937

Try looking for "SPD/flat" or "campus pedals" or "combination pedals". They're reasonably common.

Retro Grouch 05-05-13 04:29 PM

To understand "clipless pedals" you need to go back in history.

Back in the olden days we all used flat pedals. Serious riders added toe clips to the front of the pedals to help retain their feet and really serious cyclists nailed a metal cleat to their shoes that locked into the flat pedal. Dignified stopping, if you were using cleats, required either planning ahead or having good track standing skills.

Around the early 90's pedals were introduced by Look and others that used ski binding technology. They used a metal or plastic clip bolted to the bottom of the shoe that locked into a spring loaded retention device on the pedal. They were called clipless because they eliminated the shoe retention clip on the front of flat pedals.

Wanderer 05-05-13 04:33 PM

Shimano PDM324, often really cheap at Nashbar. Ck and wait for sale prices. Recently for around $40.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/S...px?Search=m324

SkyDog75 05-06-13 12:06 AM

The Shimano A530's are another option:
http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...00_-1___202531

I've used A530's and the M324's Wanderer mentioned. Both are good pedals. The A530's are lighter, but sometimes it's a little bit of a fuss to get the right side up when you're riding off from a stop. The M324's are a grippier on the side intended for regular shoes.

Looigi 05-06-13 07:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retro Grouch (Post 15591252)
...
Back in the olden days we all used flat pedals. Serious riders added toe clips to the front of the pedals to help retain their feet and really serious cyclists nailed a metal cleat to their shoes that locked into the flat pedal. Dignified stopping, if you were using cleats, required either planning ahead or having good track standing skills.

Around the early 90's pedals were introduced by Look and others that used ski binding technology. They used a metal or plastic clip bolted to the bottom of the shoe that locked into a spring loaded retention device on the pedal. They were called clipless because they eliminated the shoe retention clip on the front of flat pedals.

History of the clipless pedal, Part 2:

When the advantages of clipless pedals were recognized, moutainbikers wanted to get in on it but existing pedal and cleat designs were unworkable for mountain biking, where you frequently had to clip in and out, pedal without being clipped in, walk or portage the bike, and the pedals had to function reliably with mud and dirt caked shoes. Designers went back to the drawing board and developed mtb cleat/pedal systems that were up to the challenge.

Gloor 05-07-13 01:48 AM

Thank you guys,

would you then say that the A530 would be good choice for town biking but also forest hiking on weekends (not every weekend)?

buffalowings 05-07-13 01:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gloor (Post 15597265)
Thank you guys,

would you then say that the A530 would be good choice for town biking but also forest hiking on weekends (not every weekend)?

A530'S would be fine, although the flat pedal side has light tread so you won't be looking at anything too aggressive when biking around town.

Gloor 05-07-13 03:02 AM

What do you mean by that, please? Does it mean that its not so sturdy and might break soon? I like the design but it looks to me that it might be too fragile, (maybe)?

JimF22003 05-07-13 03:09 AM

Those pedals are not fragile. At all. The non-clip side is grippy enough to use with regular tennis shoes or even dress shoes.

Machka 05-07-13 03:31 AM

1. Your SPD cleats go into clipless pedals.

2. I use these, and have done for the past 5 years. I've got them on several of my bicycles, and really like them.


http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...x?ModelID=5937

Gloor 05-07-13 06:02 AM

The M324 is nice but when it comes to choice I much prefer A530. I was only curious if I can count on durability :)))
if you tell me that they are both good then ill probably go for A530 as they look fantastic :)

Gloor 06-09-13 01:46 PM

Hello guys,

I'm back with another question as I went to a store here and the guy suggested something so I would like to run that through you, please.
Basically I intend to bike to work with SPD and thought I would use normal shoes sometimes on a trail but the guy said that people with SPD take it for the trails also as you have much better grip and its overall better experience. Is that true?
If so, he suggested that I should consider this option as a better one. Mine was to have both, flat on one side and SPD on other but he said that SPD on both is good if I mainly use SPD and that for occasional use I can still use normal shoes - even if not as comfortable as flat it will still be ok.
What do you guys think? Btw. he suggested Shimano M530 (and they also had it discounted so he said its good timing as it was cheap 28EUR)

Wanderer 06-09-13 03:10 PM

The PDM324 is a great pedal. Great, because you can clip in, or use flip flops...... The really nice thing about the 324s, is that you can ride on the wrong side, without much issue at all. Really handy when you just ran to the store, and leave a stoplight in a hurry.

Jeff Wills 06-09-13 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gloor (Post 15723030)
Hello guys,

I'm back with another question as I went to a store here and the guy suggested something so I would like to run that through you, please.
Basically I intend to bike to work with SPD and thought I would use normal shoes sometimes on a trail but the guy said that people with SPD take it for the trails also as you have much better grip and its overall better experience. Is that true?
If so, he suggested that I should consider this option as a better one. Mine was to have both, flat on one side and SPD on other but he said that SPD on both is good if I mainly use SPD and that for occasional use I can still use normal shoes - even if not as comfortable as flat it will still be ok.
What do you guys think? Btw. he suggested Shimano M530 (and they also had it discounted so he said its good timing as it was cheap 28EUR)

I would not use Shimano M530 pedals with "normal" shoes. If you want a double-sided SPD pedal that you can occasionally use with non-SPD shoes, like the Shimano M424: http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...62_-1___202530

http://media.nashbar.com/images/nash...-NCL-ANGLE.jpg


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