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Thread: OK which bikes?

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    OK which bikes?

    Never had a mountain bike, nor had the wife. We did some easy trail riding and both liked it. So trying to decide about a mountain, cross trail or even a flat bar road bike. We live in a fairly flat area with sand and a few creeks being the toughest thing to deal with, no mountains and a few small hills. Some basic thoughts about types with advantages and shortcomings, would be great. Even some guidance on brand and models would be nice, focus on entry level.

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    What brands are in your Bike Shops. , all brands will have similar types of bike categories ..

    Drop By Take some test rides .. see for yourself.

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    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    For riding in sand, wider tires are better. That would lead me to prefer a mountain bike for it's 2" wide tires. Unless the trails that you ride are pretty rough and rocky, I'd probably want to replace the knobby tires with something smoother because they're nicer everywhere else. In fact, that describes my beater bike which I love.beater bike.jpg

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Or a Fat Bike , 4" Wide tires .

    cyclocross race courses have added sand pits , but they are included to make the riding Harder.


    You will Have to wash Your bike off after every ride through sand of course..

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    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mason Red View Post
    Never had a mountain bike, nor had the wife. We did some easy trail riding and both liked it. So trying to decide about a mountain, cross trail or even a flat bar road bike. We live in a fairly flat area with sand and a few creeks being the toughest thing to deal with, no mountains and a few small hills. Some basic thoughts about types with advantages and shortcomings, would be great. Even some guidance on brand and models would be nice, focus on entry level.
    It depends, largely, on how much you what to spend. Many cheap bikes can do an adequate job off-road but the more you spend the more refinements you get. For example, a $300 to $500 bike is going to be a boat anchor with a pogo stick stuck on the front of it. It will take the edge off rocks and bumps and give you better control in ruts. However, if you ride it on a smooth surface like a road or even a fairly smooth trail, the pogo stick (aka fork shock) will depress with nearly every pedal stroke. The more you weigh, the worse the problem.

    If you spend more in the $800 to $2000 range, you can get a bike with a fork that may have air to provide the spring so it's handles the bumps better and absorbs the impact in a more controlled manner. More importantly, in this price range, the forks usually have a lock out mechanism so that the fork doesn't depress when you ride on a smooth surface. There is usually a good weight difference between those two ranges.

    If you push beyond $2000, you are getting into bikes that have dual suspensions which offer advantages when you are climbing and descending or hard tail (no rear suspension) bikes that have lots of refinements. The bikes also have better components and better forks. The bikes tend to be lighter but you pay for it.

    For most people new to the sport of mountain biking, I'd say that the 4 series Treks are a good place to start. The 4300 is a good solid bike that will give you a lot of service. Giant, Kona, Jamis, etc all have similar bikes.
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    Wife liked trek 820s, sure price was a big influence, I would just like to spend more time riding together. I know these are heavy and entry level. Any experience with them would be appreciated. Need to decide in the next few days.

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