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Old 07-22-13, 12:02 AM   #1
JSanc016
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Century on a Trek FX 7.1?

Hello,

So I just got a new FX 7.1, and I got attachments to the handle bars to provide more grip options. I am also thinking of changing the seat to a more comfortable one. So my question is is it possible to do a century on it? Has anyone tried or done one on a FX 7.1? I will greatly appreciate any help with this question
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Old 07-22-13, 12:22 AM   #2
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Welcome aboard

If people can do it on knobby tired mtbs, then you can do it on a hybrid... or rather, the equipment is up to it- whether your mind/body is up to it is something only you can determine by trying it.

BTW, I'm correcting the thread title so that the "of" will be "on".
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Old 07-22-13, 03:24 AM   #3
sreten
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Hi,

Its possible, eventually. A saddle that is good for
100 miles is a lot harder than one good for 10 miles.

Don't change out a saddle that seems too hard on
a new bike unless it really doesn't seem fit to fit you.

Build up mileages slowly, you will find your zone.

rgds, sreten.
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Old 07-22-13, 05:20 AM   #4
apetro3
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Last month I did 81 miles on an FX 7.5. I could have done another 19. Everything on the bike was original equipment.
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Old 07-22-13, 09:05 AM   #5
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Maybe the issue is whether you can ride 100 miles, and if so, when. The principal question for you to answer might be why.Begin by riding 25, 30, 45, 50 miles comfortably. Then ask yourself if you have the desire to double the time in the saddle...

I also wouldn't worry about changing out the stock saddle until you have ridden it for a few months. Check back in with a progress report, especially about what you've discovered as you've ridden for greater amounts of time.
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Old 07-22-13, 06:31 PM   #6
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I actually just got the bike yesterday. I took it on an 8 mile run, and I felt it ran smoothly, but the seat did feel a little uncomfortable, but may be due to the fact that I never really cycled before, I am just a former runner switching over to cycling. I do appreciate the advice I will ride until I can go longer distances before I make the decision on switching the seat.Also I am knowledgeable in training for long runs, but new to cycling so any training schedule that you guys may suggest to prepare for a century?[IMG]file:///C:/Users/Javier/Desktop/20130721_160814.jpg[/IMG] Here is a picture of the bike probably should have added that in the post to begin with
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Old 07-22-13, 07:52 PM   #7
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Hi,

I bought a cheap folder at Christmas. Warned that the saddle
was awful from reviews I replaced it before riding the bike.

Good move. No problems at all in normal clothing for 3 months
doing up to 15 miles a day. Fabulous saddle for daily commuting.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TIGER-UNIS...item4ab72204d0

Bought a road bike at Easter. Hard saddle seemed sized for a teenager.
Painful. Bought a cheap plusher bigger saddle, better but still painful,
in a very different way, just basically too soft and chafing.

Bought some cycling shorts and a decent road bike saddle, much better.

Started racking up longer mileages on the road bike

The shorts are pretty pointless with the folders saddle and it runs
out of comfort at around 20 miles per day, less than 15 its great.
Having done 30 miles on it once, 100 miles is not an option.

My plan is to do my 50+ age and a metric century before the year
is out and I am quite happy to relegate a real century to next year.

I've yet to go for Vaseline in my shorts,
but will have to eventually, I assume.



rgds, sreten.

Last edited by sreten; 07-22-13 at 08:06 PM.
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Old 08-05-13, 06:30 AM   #8
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Did my first century on Saturday with my Trek FX 7.5. Averaged about 15.7 mph. I even felt that I could have gone faster, but my ride partner was having an off day. It wasn't in the spirit of things to leave him behind (for too long, anyway). I'd say the only real issue I had was with numbness in my hands. I have my stem flipped and the bars have been lowered down by two spacers. So that might be why.

Point being, a century on an FX is definitely possible. Probably not the ideal bike for a ride of that length, but it does work if you want it to.
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Old 08-05-13, 07:29 AM   #9
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Take it easy starting, just log shorter <10mi rides and try to do them close together. If the saddle is adjusted properly the pain/discomfort should be squarely on your sit bones and will go away or vastly improve in a dozen rides or so. It's not particularly great when you first get back or get into cycling.

Also coming from running, your legs will need to adjust so stick to lower/easier spinning gears than you think you want and keep the cadence of spinning up vs mashing higher resistance. Takes a bit of getting used to spinning smoothly but it is effort well spent, particularly for endurance.
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Old 08-05-13, 06:20 PM   #10
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get up early , do 65 before lunch , so you only have 35 more, after lunch.
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Old 08-05-13, 06:48 PM   #11
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If you are a strong rider, you can do a century on a hybrid, though if you are riding with a bunch of strong riders on light fast road bikes, you will have to work harder than your friends. Only you can decide if you want to ride 7 to 10 hours in a day, depending on your pace. My suggestion is to try a few 15 or 20 mile loops and see how that feels. Then build up the miles. As you do so, pay attention to how your contact points feel; your butt, hands, and feet, as well as your back and shoulders. If you have numbness and/or pain, you may need to adjust your fit. If your butt is sore after 3 or 4 weeks of regular riding, then maybe consider trying a different saddle and remember, it isn't necessarily the softest, squishiest saddle that will be most comfortable. (actually firmer ones are better for longer rides, surprisingly) I never managed to dial in the fit of my old hybrid, or my conditioning so I could do more than 45 miles a day, but when I bought it, I never expected to ride it for more than an hour or two at a time.

If you decide that long distance cycling is your thing, I see a road, or maybe touring bike in your future. But, for the occasional half century or century ride for charity or with friends, if you are fit, you should be able to do it.

Last edited by MRT2; 08-08-13 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 08-08-13, 09:00 AM   #12
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new to cycling, and going to do a century ride on any bike, never mind a new un-adjusted bike, may not be advisable. spend a little time with the bike, get the fit right, get your saddle picked out/adjusted right, build up your miles to at least 30-50 before trying an all-day event!
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Old 08-08-13, 05:44 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Maybe the issue is whether you can ride 100 miles, and if so, when. The principal question for you to answer might be why.Begin by riding 25, 30, 45, 50 miles comfortably. Then ask yourself if you have the desire to double the time in the saddle...
I agree. I'm also a former runner who switched, though it was 25 years ago, when I was 43. I did my first century my first year on the bike, and my longest previous ride had been 12 miles. It took everything I had and exhausted me for two weeks, and I was in peak (running) condition.
Your bike will certainly go 100 miles. I know people who've done centuries on mountain bikes, cruisers, scooters and even a four-person pedal-op cart. But a century is hard--being able to ride 50 or even 75 miles is no guarantee you can do the last two hours. Train.
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Old 08-26-13, 09:57 PM   #14
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Hello all,
Been busy with work, so replying to the post skipped my mind. I will first like to thank everyone who responded your advice is greatly appreciated. A small update I have began training and can do 20 miles at a comfortable pace, and now I will begin to start to slowly built up the mileage
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