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Old 08-17-13, 11:12 PM   #1
daihard 
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Holding the top tube and brake cable together... is it bad for the cable?

My new bike (Trek 7.5 FX) has its rear brake cable run right beneath the top tube. It means that when I carry it by grabbing the top tube (i.e. putting it on the bus rack), I inevitably hold the tube and cable together in my hand, pulling the cable a bit. Is it bad for the cable? I'm pretty sure it won't cause any short-term damage, but should I avoid doing so for the long-term durability of the cable?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-17-13, 11:37 PM   #2
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I wouldn't sweat it; cables are cheap and easy enough to replace. But, really, unless you're picking the bike up just by the cable itself, the risk is all but nonexistent.
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Old 08-18-13, 10:28 AM   #3
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I wouldn't sweat it; cables are cheap and easy enough to replace. But, really, unless you're picking the bike up just by the cable itself, the risk is all but nonexistent.
Thanks! It's good to know.
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Old 08-18-13, 01:28 PM   #4
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I have something simiular problem my road bike is hanging on the wall on a rack and the rack cradles the top tube and that is where the brake cable runs and it hits right on it,,,but I guess it's OK
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Old 08-18-13, 01:55 PM   #5
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Quit worrying about it -- the cable gets pulled much further when you use the brakes.
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Old 08-18-13, 03:20 PM   #6
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Quit worrying about it -- the cable gets pulled much further when you use the brakes.


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Old 08-18-13, 05:44 PM   #7
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Quit worrying about it -- the cable gets pulled much further when you use the brakes.
That's true. In fact, I tripped it this afternoon and the cable got off the hook when I tried to take my coffee tumbler from the bottle holder. So much for being extra careful. LOL
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Old 08-18-13, 06:02 PM   #8
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The only think bad that I can think of happening is that after years of doing it, you might abrade the paint. Keep it waxed and don't rub the cable across the paint when you grab it there.
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Old 08-18-13, 07:27 PM   #9
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Take a pair of pliers and try to crush the cable housing. When you can't do it, stop worrying that you'll damage it with your hand. And don't sweat abrading the paint, either. It's a bicycle; if you use it, it won't stay pristine for long.
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Old 08-19-13, 08:05 AM   #10
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And don't sweat abrading the paint, either. It's a bicycle; if you use it, it won't stay pristine for long.
Yeah, I'm not worried about paint at all. I've ridden my new bike for about 30 miles by now, and it's already got a couple of small scratches on the frame. You don't buy a Ferrari just to keep it shining in the garage.
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Old 08-19-13, 08:22 AM   #11
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Yeah, I'm not worried about paint at all. I've ridden my new bike for about 30 miles by now, and it's already got a couple of small scratches on the frame. You don't buy a Ferrari just to keep it shining in the garage.
Scratches are the personality of a bike. Each one should be view as a badge of honor. The bike is being ridden. A bike that is 5, 10 or 20 years old without scratches is a sad museum piece without a story. A bike with scars, like a person, has an incredible story to tell. Ride your bike, scratch it and tell its story.
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Old 08-19-13, 08:24 AM   #12
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Scratches are the personality of a bike. Each one should be view as a badge of honor. The bike is being ridden. A bike that is 5, 10 or 20 years old without scratches is a sad museum piece without a story. A bike with scars, like a person, has an incredible story to tell. Ride your bike, scratch it and tell its story.
Totally agreed!
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