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Old 09-30-13, 10:41 AM   #1
ScottRae
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Keep them hard

My good friend's back tire always looks a little low. He is one of these people that doesn't sweat the small stuff. If you are new to cycling or you have the same personality as my friend, save up and buy a good floor pump, and use the psi numbers on the side of the tire. If you do have the same personality as my friend you are probably a very happy person already, but is so much more fun to ride with the right pressure in your tires.
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Old 09-30-13, 10:48 AM   #2
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Depending on the tire and weight of the rider, you often don't want to inflate to the maximum pressure. But regardless, you do want to check and make sure you're running at whatever pressure you mean to be running.
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Old 09-30-13, 10:56 AM   #3
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I like them supple and firm, but not hard, myself.
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Old 09-30-13, 11:32 AM   #4
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I like them supple and firm, but not hard, myself.
We're talking about tires, right? Not dating.
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Old 09-30-13, 05:01 PM   #5
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Old 09-30-13, 05:44 PM   #6
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Mine always look like that no matter what. I have hybrid tires on a hybrid bike and am 225lbs but even if I was lighter it would seem the would be like that some.
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Old 09-30-13, 05:58 PM   #7
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I like mine softer. Too hard and they start to shake and become harder to handle. Too soft and they don't last as long because of friction. I would never go too hard as one of them could blow. It never happened to me though.

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Old 09-30-13, 06:45 PM   #8
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I would never go too hard as one of them could blow. It never happened to me though.
Especially scary when you're going down.
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Old 09-30-13, 06:48 PM   #9
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Sheldon Brown has some good information on tire inflation. The tire is supposed to bulge a little when you sit on it or it's overinflated.

www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html#width
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Old 09-30-13, 08:04 PM   #10
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Sheldon Brown has some good information on tire inflation. The tire is supposed to bulge a little when you sit on it or it's overinflated.

www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html#width
A 15% tire drop or bulge would be about right.
http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
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Old 09-30-13, 08:10 PM   #11
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Some seem to think that I am condoning over inflating tires. I did say look at the numbers on the sides of the tire.
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Old 09-30-13, 10:55 PM   #12
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Some seem to think that I am condoning over inflating tires. I did say look at the numbers on the sides of the tire.
The PSI numbers on the side of the tires are maximum pressures, not the correct pressure for a specific rider. The PSI required for a 140 pound rider is not the same as that required for a 200 pound rider.
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Old 10-01-13, 06:51 AM   #13
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Some seem to think that I am condoning over inflating tires. I did say look at the numbers on the sides of the tire.
I run my tires a little bit lower than the numbers on the side of the tires because I find it gives me a better ride. My tires might say, for example, 120 psi ... but I run them about 100 psi. Much nicer.
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Old 10-01-13, 11:00 AM   #14
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Some seem to think that I am condoning over inflating tires. I did say look at the numbers on the sides of the tire.
There is no detail too insignificant to be parsed on BF.
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Old 10-01-13, 11:12 AM   #15
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That tire drop pdf is interesting. It suggests tire pressures that are much lower than what common wisdom dictates. As long as you are not getting pinch flats or bottoming out on rocks or debris it's all good. That means most folks can run much lower pressures that those most folks run.
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Old 10-01-13, 11:55 AM   #16
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That tire drop pdf is interesting. It suggests tire pressures that are much lower than what common wisdom dictates. As long as you are not getting pinch flats or bottoming out on rocks or debris it's all good. That means most folks can run much lower pressures that those most folks run.
Yep. I suspect that those of us who've had no issues with the guidelines are running larger tires than our weight would "require" anyway. (For example, I'm 160 lbs and don't use any tires smaller than 28mm.)
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Old 10-02-13, 04:32 AM   #17
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Yep. I suspect that those of us who've had no issues with the guidelines are running larger tires than our weight would "require" anyway. (For example, I'm 160 lbs and don't use any tires smaller than 28mm.)
I got nothing under 35's and most are 40+

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Old 10-02-13, 04:45 AM   #18
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When all the air is on the outside of the tire, you have a problem.

You're friend will trade sweating the little things for letting te big things dictate his life. Lacing up new rims is a real time suck.
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Old 10-02-13, 04:56 AM   #19
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Mine feel the best around 90 front/100 rear but I pump them up to 120ish anyway. That way I don't have to pump them up again for 3-4 days. Sometimes I get let them get as low as 70/80 before I fill them again.
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Old 10-02-13, 05:41 AM   #20
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I tell the kids at the coop to pump their tires until they get bored, take it for a test ride and then slowly let air out until the drivetrain isn't clanking around as they ride around town normally. I've found this to be one of the most reliable ways to find that sweet spot in tire pressure.

One thing's for sure, once you've felt a nice, supple, tire at the proper pressure, you're never going back to ignoring them like you once did.
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Old 10-02-13, 07:32 AM   #21
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I made up a little table based on Berto's tire drop graphs, plus a bit of theorizing:

http://interdependentscience.blogspot.com/2013/06/bicycle-tire-pressure.html

These pressures are probably at the low end of the general riding range. But "the right pressure" depends on lots of factors, e.g. how smooth the road is. If most of the weight on the bike is a skilled rider or tied to the rider, e.g. in a backpack, then the rider can unweight the bike to hop over obstacles. If the weight is tied to the bike, then the tires have to manage the collision on their own. Ah, but what if the bike has suspension forks etc.? Seems then you can use higher pressure. Unless you're using the mountain bike on a loose surface like mud or gravel, in which case you want lower pressure to improve traction. Tricky stuff!
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Old 10-02-13, 05:15 PM   #22
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I made up a little table based on Berto's tire drop graphs, plus a bit of theorizing:

http://interdependentscience.blogspot.com/2013/06/bicycle-tire-pressure.html

These pressures are probably at the low end of the general riding range. But "the right pressure" depends on lots of factors, e.g. how smooth the road is. If most of the weight on the bike is a skilled rider or tied to the rider, e.g. in a backpack, then the rider can unweight the bike to hop over obstacles. If the weight is tied to the bike, then the tires have to manage the collision on their own. Ah, but what if the bike has suspension forks etc.? Seems then you can use higher pressure. Unless you're using the mountain bike on a loose surface like mud or gravel, in which case you want lower pressure to improve traction. Tricky stuff!
Only issue I see is that the front wheel typically carries a lighter load than the rear under normal conditions, IIRC something in the 30%/70%, never bothered to measure. I am large enough and carry enough weight on my bike that full sidewall pressure is usually my best bet.

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