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  1. #1
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    About specs on this bike

    I'm asking a serious question here. I'd like to know what you think of the specs on this bike. I know it's a bikes direct bike, I don't want this to turn into a discussion about the quality or customer service issues that BD may or may not have. My question revolves around how much better of a bike this would be vs my late 90's Trek Multitrac hybrid, which has been updated somewhat from it's original form. How much do you think this bike would weight? I was thinking it would be in the 20 - 21 lbs range. Does this sound reasonable? I would be buying the small size for a rider 5'4" to 5'7". I'd likely use crank bro eggbeater pedals.
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  2. #2
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    My guess is that the BD bike might be a bit heavier than 22 lbs (but not too much).

    The BD bike will have a more aerodynamic, aggressive position. That should mean faster high end speed, but if your body doesn't like the position, then that's not a positive.

    I'm not a big fan of 23c tires on the BD bike, but if you only ride on good roads, you shouldn't have an issue. The BD tires will likely roll faster than what you currently have on your Trek.

    If you have your Trek tricked out with lower handlebars/bar ends and faster tires, you might not notice much of a difference at all on flats; I'm assuming the Trek is heavier, but depending on your weight, that may or may not be a big deal (it wouldn't be at my weight).

    It's not a crazy choice; it looks reasonable enough for a entry level road bike, if that's what you want. It would be noticeably different than the stock Trek. It may not be very different than a highly modified Trek.
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  3. #3
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Well I would still think 22 or a little heavier would still be lighter than my Trek which tips the scales at 27-28lbs. I have owned road bikes in the past, gave them up and switched to recumbents and have since received treatment for my back problems which made me switch to 'bents. Now my back is much better and I am thinking I can probably ride a road bike again. My trek is done with lowered flat bar handlebars and faster 700x28 specialized armadillo tires.
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  4. #4
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    If we're talking about 5 lbs of difference, remember that it's (you + the lighter bike + 5 lbs / you + lighter bike) that you'll see on the hills, but not on the flats. I wouldn't do it for weight differences. Drops might be more aerodynamic if you rode in the drops, but probably not so much on the hoods (after looking at your bike:
    )

    If you think that drop bars will work better for you, then that's not a bad reason. If you really want a second bike, then that works for me, too.

    If you're handy with a wrench, I'd check out Craigslists first as you can test-ride those bikes and find as good if not better deal with a little bit of patience. That being said, most people I've talked to who have bought from BD are happy with their purchases and it doesn't look like a bad choice.
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  5. #5
    PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes dynaryder's Avatar
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    That bike is fine for the price. As to whether it's a 'better' bike,that would depend on usage. It certainly wouldn't be better on trails,riding in snow,or carrying loaded panniers/pulling a trailer.

    The thing to keep in mind with BD bikes is setup. They need to be completely gone over when put together,and the wheels will need proper tensioning. If you can do this yourself,or pay a reputable shop to do it for you,then they are as good as any other bike.

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  6. #6
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    I think it's a fine bike for the money. I do hate that it's a triple.

  7. #7
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    My guess is that the BD bike might be a bit heavier than 22 lbs (but not too much).

    The BD bike will have a more aerodynamic, aggressive position. That should mean faster high end speed, but if your body doesn't like the position, then that's not a positive.

    I'm not a big fan of 23c tires on the BD bike, but if you only ride on good roads, you shouldn't have an issue. The BD tires will likely roll faster than what you currently have on your Trek.

    If you have your Trek tricked out with lower handlebars/bar ends and faster tires, you might not notice much of a difference at all on flats; I'm assuming the Trek is heavier, but depending on your weight, that may or may not be a big deal (it wouldn't be at my weight).

    It's not a crazy choice; it looks reasonable enough for a entry level road bike, if that's what you want. It would be noticeably different than the stock Trek. It may not be very different than a highly modified Trek.
    Just a minor quibble but I'd put it more in the 23 to 25 lb range. BD does a number of things to cut cost corners. One of the biggest is to use a carbon fork with carbon blades and a steel steer tube. The crankset has alloy arms but likely has steel rings. And the square taper bottom bracket isn't going to be all that light. The Microshift components are going to add weight as well. 25 lb isn't bad and the price is okay but there are trade offs being made to keep the price low.
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  8. #8
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cplager View Post
    If we're talking about 5 lbs of difference, remember that it's (you + the lighter bike + 5 lbs / you + lighter bike) that you'll see on the hills, but not on the flats. I wouldn't do it for weight differences. Drops might be more aerodynamic if you rode in the drops, but probably not so much on the hoods (after looking at your bike:
    )

    If you think that drop bars will work better for you, then that's not a bad reason. If you really want a second bike, then that works for me, too.

    If you're handy with a wrench, I'd check out Craigslists first as you can test-ride those bikes and find as good if not better deal with a little bit of patience. That being said, most people I've talked to who have bought from BD are happy with their purchases and it doesn't look like a bad choice.
    Well as I remember from the last road bike I owned I like riding on the brake hoods and thought that was a fairly comfortable position, however that was with my back issues perhaps riding in the drops would be more possible now. As for wanting a second bike, kind of, that would let me set the Trek up a little better for short overnight/weekend tours. I haven't done any in years but would like to start doing some again. I think the Trek would be a good bike for this purpose.. And I always scan craigslist for bikes, but seems like small road bikes are hard to find.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Just a minor quibble but I'd put it more in the 23 to 25 lb range.
    My guess as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
    That bike is fine for the price. As to whether it's a 'better' bike,that would depend on usage. It certainly wouldn't be better on trails,riding in snow,or carrying loaded panniers/pulling a trailer.

    The thing to keep in mind with BD bikes is setup. They need to be completely gone over when put together,and the wheels will need proper tensioning. If you can do this yourself,or pay a reputable shop to do it for you,then they are as good as any other bike.
    Right on.
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  11. #11
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    I like the orange!

  12. #12
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Just a minor quibble but I'd put it more in the 23 to 25 lb range. BD does a number of things to cut cost corners. One of the biggest is to use a carbon fork with carbon blades and a steel steer tube. The crankset has alloy arms but likely has steel rings. And the square taper bottom bracket isn't going to be all that light. The Microshift components are going to add weight as well. 25 lb isn't bad and the price is okay but there are trade offs being made to keep the price low.
    Well I'd like to move up to something a little lighter, perhaps I can squeeze a couple hundred more out of the budget and move up a class or two. Do I need a sub 16 lb carbon racer, my answer is no. But I'd like to ride a little faster, while working on the engine, maybe ride longer with a little less effort. My usual ride is about 30 miles on the local trail, I'm usually out for about 2&1/2 hours, depending on how many and how long my breaks are.
    "Normal" is just a setting on a washing machine.

  13. #13
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
    That bike is fine for the price. As to whether it's a 'better' bike,that would depend on usage. It certainly wouldn't be better on trails,riding in snow,or carrying loaded panniers/pulling a trailer.

    The thing to keep in mind with BD bikes is setup. They need to be completely gone over when put together,and the wheels will need proper tensioning. If you can do this yourself,or pay a reputable shop to do it for you,then they are as good as any other bike.
    Well I can wrench on a bike pretty well, the only thing I really can't do well is tune wheels, but the lbs down the road always treats me well when it comes to stuff like that. I' not sure what I'd like to do for another bike yet. I'd like to set the Trek for short tours and just leave it set up like that, I don't want to be taking racks on and off all the time.
    "Normal" is just a setting on a washing machine.

  14. #14
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
    I like the orange!
    I think they had one that was a green color, almost Kawasaki green. Very cool color.
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  15. #15
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
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    As already pointed out its a triple. You DO NOT need a triple in flat Venice. A triple is for climbing BIG hills and mountains.
    Look for a bike with a double chainring. That will be more than enough gears.
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  16. #16
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    No I know I don't need triple. But it seems like most of BD's bikes come with triples.
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  17. #17
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonH View Post
    As already pointed out its a triple. You DO NOT need a triple in flat Venice. A triple is for climbing BIG hills and mountains.
    Look for a bike with a double chainring. That will be more than enough gears.
    I can see why maybe the OP shouldn't turn down a double, but even if he almost never needs it, what's wrong with a triple? My triples shift just as well as any double and I have the low gears when I need them.
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  18. #18
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    there is nothing about the road bike
    that will necessarily allow you to ride faster
    perhaps the hard 23mm tires will roll faster than soft 35mm tires
    but you can put narrower higher pressure tires on the trek as well

    the bikes are different
    and the riding position on the bd bike might allow you to put a little more power to the pedals
    or it might not

  19. #19
    Senior Member clarkbre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    the bikes are different
    and the riding position on the bd bike might allow you to put a little more power to the pedals
    or it might not
    That's it right there. The geometry of the two bikes is different. Generally, road bikes are built for the rider to produce the same power more efficiently than a hybrid.

    For the OP: The two things I would truly not worry about are weight of the bike and a double vs. triple crankset.

    Weight:
    It has been noted in this thread that the OP will be riding on relatively flat terrain. It seems that in all the bike weight comparison, scientific studies, the conclusion is that weight would have a minimal bearing on a long hill climb where seconds matter...Example: finishing a bike race with a 10% grade for 5 miles...Not around town. Also take into account the overall weight. The difference of a 160 pound person riding a 20 or 25 pound bike is only 2.7%. It would be much more cost effective and noticeable to the rider to lose 5 pounds off his body rather than off his bike.

    Single vs. double vs. triple cranks: None of these mean a thing until you install a cassette and rear tire. What the actual concern should be is what the range is in gear inches.
    Example:
    One of my bikes has a 34t single with a gear inch range of 33-84 with a 11/28 7 speed cassette,
    Another bike has a 24/34/42t crankset with a gear inch range of 31-94 with a 12/21 7 speed cassette,
    Lastly, my road bike has a 30/42/52t crankset with a gear inch range of 29-114 using a 12/27 9 speed cassette.

    Whatever the new bike has, you can always change the rear cassette for closer or a broader range of gears.

    Also, a couple years ago I rode a BD Motobecane Mirage Sport for a season. Overall, it wasn't a bad bike at all. Correctly tuned, it worked well and kept me on the road for many miles.
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  20. #20
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clarkbre View Post
    That's it right there. The geometry of the two bikes is different. Generally, road bikes are built for the rider to produce the same power more efficiently than a hybrid.

    For the OP: The two things I would truly not worry about are weight of the bike and a double vs. triple crankset.

    Weight:
    It has been noted in this thread that the OP will be riding on relatively flat terrain. It seems that in all the bike weight comparison, scientific studies, the conclusion is that weight would have a minimal bearing on a long hill climb where seconds matter...Example: finishing a bike race with a 10% grade for 5 miles...Not around town. Also take into account the overall weight. The difference of a 160 pound person riding a 20 or 25 pound bike is only 2.7%. It would be much more cost effective and noticeable to the rider to lose 5 pounds off his body rather than off his bike.

    Single vs. double vs. triple cranks: None of these mean a thing until you install a cassette and rear tire. What the actual concern should be is what the range is in gear inches.
    Example:
    One of my bikes has a 34t single with a gear inch range of 33-84 with a 11/28 7 speed cassette,
    Another bike has a 24/34/42t crankset with a gear inch range of 31-94 with a 12/21 7 speed cassette,
    Lastly, my road bike has a 30/42/52t crankset with a gear inch range of 29-114 using a 12/27 9 speed cassette.

    Whatever the new bike has, you can always change the rear cassette for closer or a broader range of gears.

    Also, a couple years ago I rode a BD Motobecane Mirage Sport for a season. Overall, it wasn't a bad bike at all. Correctly tuned, it worked well and kept me on the road for many miles.
    Well I certainly am not an expert on frame designs and how one design might be more efficient at transferring power from the rider to the ground, but clearly there must be a difference, the pros riding in the TDF don't ride mountain bikes, hybrids and cruisers, they ride bikes with drop bars. I am no where close to a pro, but if I can gain a little benifit from riding a bike similar to the bikes they ride, I'll take that advantage. As I said before I don't need a sub 16lb carbon racer.
    "Normal" is just a setting on a washing machine.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeguyinvenice View Post
    Well I certainly am not an expert on frame designs and how one design might be more efficient at transferring power from the rider to the ground, but clearly there must be a difference, the pros riding in the TDF don't ride mountain bikes, hybrids and cruisers, they ride bikes with drop bars. I am no where close to a pro, but if I can gain a little benifit from riding a bike similar to the bikes they ride, I'll take that advantage. As I said before I don't need a sub 16lb carbon racer.
    the bd bike might look like a tdf race bike
    but that is not what it is

    the only thing the tdf bikes have in common with the bd bike
    is the general shape of the bars
    and the inability to use tires wider than 25mm

    the geometry and layout of road racing bikes
    is generally different from road sport bikes

    racing bikes usually feature a six or eight inch drop from the saddle to the bars
    and have a short head tube to make it possible

    road sport bikes have much less drop or bars equal with the saddle
    or even higher than the saddle

    the ability to generate power is greatest for pro racers on pro race style bikes
    because that is what they have trained their bodies to use
    you or i on the same bike will get very different results

  22. #22
    A tiny member bikeguyinvenice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    the bd bike might look like a tdf race bike
    but that is not what it is

    the only thing the tdf bikes have in common with the bd bike
    is the general shape of the bars
    and the inability to use tires wider than 25mm

    the geometry and layout of road racing bikes
    is generally different from road sport bikes

    racing bikes usually feature a six or eight inch drop from the saddle to the bars
    and have a short head tube to make it possible

    road sport bikes have much less drop or bars equal with the saddle
    or even higher than the saddle

    the ability to generate power is greatest for pro racers on pro race style bikes
    because that is what they have trained their bodies to use
    you or i on the same bike will get very different results
    Well yeah, the pro riders are way more bent over their bars than any bike I have ever ridden. I don't have the time to train like a pro, and I'm to old to be a pro anyway. I like road bars because they seem to offer better hand positions than flat bars. So that would be another reason to buy a road bike. Sure I could probably do a drop bar conversion to my current Trek, but that's probably another couple hundred dollars in parts, and it would still just be one bike. So it might be time for another bike.
    "Normal" is just a setting on a washing machine.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeguyinvenice View Post
    Well yeah, the pro riders are way more bent over their bars than any bike I have ever ridden. I don't have the time to train like a pro, and I'm to old to be a pro anyway. I like road bars because they seem to offer better hand positions than flat bars. So that would be another reason to buy a road bike. Sure I could probably do a drop bar conversion to my current Trek, but that's probably another couple hundred dollars in parts, and it would still just be one bike. So it might be time for another bike.

    for most people
    drop bars are far superior in almost every application
    because of the multiple hand positions
    and the primary hand position
    which is usually on the brake hoods
    is far more natural than a straight bar
    imho

    however
    my previous post was not meant to say
    that road bikes and road bars
    are not better in some ways
    but that how much better they are
    depends on the individual rider
    and if you already had a pretty good position on the trek
    switching bikes will not automatically make you faster

    my only concern with the bd bike
    is the likely inability to fit tires wider than 25mm
    as is common on almost all of todays road bikes
    which derastically limits the bikes usefullness
    if you ever want to ride anywhere other than smooth roads and paved trails

    bd has a number of other bikes
    like this one
    and this one
    and this one
    and probably others
    that are in your price range
    and have room for wider tires
    and will still ride like a road bike
    Last edited by Wilfred Laurier; 11-07-13 at 10:51 AM. Reason: accidentally hit post the first time

  24. #24
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
    bd has a number of other bikes
    like this one
    and this one
    and this one
    and probably others
    that are in your price range
    and have room for wider tires
    and will still ride like a road bike
    For what it's worth, being able to put on wide tires is a very good thing, particularly if you're considering not riding on pavement. I've ridden on limestone trails on 28s and I did not like it at all. On 23s? Hah!
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  25. #25
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    A light, new, sporty bike is always fun. Get a new bike!
    Chaad--'95 DeKerf Team SL, '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '05 Novara Buzz, '73 Schwinn Collegiate, '06 Mountain Cycle Rumble, '09 Dahon Mariner D7, '12 Mercier Nano, '12 Breezer Venturi

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